f



Resizing (enlarging) Mac boot partition?

I'll preface this by saying I am not a Mac expert by any stretch of
the imagination. (Though I have worked with Unix systems for over
30 years and feel at home with the Mac command line.)

I helped a friend install an upgraded hard drive in a Macbook Pro
using a 500GB drive to replace the old 80GB unit. We sucessfully copied
the old drive to the new using "Clonezilla" (a Linux-based disk cloning
utility), but have run into a brick wall as far as utilizing the additional
space, we seem to be stuck with using just the original 80GB. The Mac
is currently running OS X 10.4.11. Its command-line diskutil only offered to
shrink the existing partition, not expand it.

Nothing I've found so far has been able to enlarge the HPFS+
partition, or for that matter even add another partition without
wiping out the contents of the drive. (This is very frustrating
since this is a trivial operation in Linux and Windows.)

Obviously the worst-case scenario here is to just bite the bullet and
reload everything from scratch to make use of the entire drive, but
we are trying to avoid that! Are there any utility programs available
that can expand the Mac's boot partition, or at least non-destructively add
additional partitions to the drive to make the additional space usable?

One program we found called "iPartition" seems like it may be able to
do this. Has anyone here used iPartition successfully? Any other
recommendations?

-- 
  Roger Blake
  (Subtract 10s for email. "Google Groups" messages killfiled due to spam.)
0
Roger
7/30/2009 11:30:28 PM
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In article <slrnh74b88.im9.rogblake10@otaku.freeshell.org>, Roger Blake
<rogblake10@iname10.com> wrote:

> I'll preface this by saying I am not a Mac expert by any stretch of
> the imagination. (Though I have worked with Unix systems for over
> 30 years and feel at home with the Mac command line.)
> 
> I helped a friend install an upgraded hard drive in a Macbook Pro
> using a 500GB drive to replace the old 80GB unit. We sucessfully copied
> the old drive to the new using "Clonezilla" (a Linux-based disk cloning
> utility),

why in the world would you use a linux utility to clone a mac volume?

all you need to do is clone the 80 gig to the 500 gig drive with
superduper.  for what you need to do, the free version is sufficient.
why make things more difficult than necessary?

<http://www.shirt-pocket.com/SuperDuper/SuperDuperDescription.html>
0
nospam59 (11089)
7/31/2009 1:11:35 AM
On 2009-07-31, nospam <nospam@nospam.invalid> wrote:
> why in the world would you use a linux utility to clone a mac volume?

Because my google search on cloning Mac drives came up with clonezilla. :-)
(It did work surprisingly well, aside from not being able to upsize the
partition, the new drive boots up with no problems.)

><http://www.shirt-pocket.com/SuperDuper/SuperDuperDescription.html>

Thanks, I'll check it out!

-- 
  Roger Blake
  (Subtract 10s for email. "Google Groups" messages killfiled due to spam.)
  "Obama dozed while people froze."
0
rogblake10 (159)
7/31/2009 1:32:07 AM
In article <slrnh74ica.96p.rogblake10@otaku.freeshell.org>, Roger Blake
<rogblake10@iname10.com> wrote:

> > why in the world would you use a linux utility to clone a mac volume?
> 
> Because my google search on cloning Mac drives came up with clonezilla. :-)

that's strange. carbon copy cloner and superduper didn't show up?

> (It did work surprisingly well, aside from not being able to upsize the
> partition, the new drive boots up with no problems.)

it sounds like it did a block copy leaving the 500 gig drive looking
like an 80 gig, which is not what you want.
0
nospam59 (11089)
7/31/2009 2:26:45 AM
On 2009-07-31, nospam <nospam@nospam.invalid> wrote:
> that's strange. carbon copy cloner and superduper didn't show up?

Admittedly my eye tended to catch utilities I am familiar with. I've
used clonezilla many times to clone Windoze XP and Vista systems successfully,
so I figured if it also works with the Mac, why not?

> it sounds like it did a block copy leaving the 500 gig drive looking
> like an 80 gig, which is not what you want.

I'm not sure if that's what clonezilla did, copy time was much less
than I would have expected for 80GB to a USB-connected drive, and
logging indicated a bit more going on under the hood. I think the
underlying Linux programs used by clonezilla do have some level of
HPFS+ support, as they do with NTFS. (Of course a simple block-for-block
copy could have been done using any *nix system with dd, nothing
special needed for that.)

The surprise came when I was unable to expand the resulting partition
on the new drive. Even more surprising was not being able to add
another partition/filesystem without dire warnings that the existing
partition would be wiped out.

In any event, superduper certainly looks like it should do the job
if used to redo the cloning.  Am I correct that rather than being
a standalone bootable utility, it needs to installed and executed
on the system that is to be copied? This being the case, is it
possible to boot off the original drive via USB? (This would save
having to open up the Macbook Pro again to swap the original drive
back in for cloning.)

-- 
  Roger Blake
  (Subtract 10s for email. "Google Groups" messages killfiled due to spam.)
0
rogblake10 (159)
7/31/2009 3:24:57 AM
In article <slrnh74ovt.4j8.rogblake10@otaku.freeshell.org>, Roger Blake
<rogblake10@iname10.com> wrote:

> In any event, superduper certainly looks like it should do the job
> if used to redo the cloning.  Am I correct that rather than being
> a standalone bootable utility, it needs to installed and executed
> on the system that is to be copied? This being the case, is it
> possible to boot off the original drive via USB? (This would save
> having to open up the Macbook Pro again to swap the original drive
> back in for cloning.)

it can clone the drive on which it's installed, but ideally you should
boot off a separate drive and attach the 80 & 500 gig and clone.  you
can also boot from usb or firewire on intel.
0
nospam59 (11089)
7/31/2009 4:04:54 AM
Roger Blake <rogblake10@iname10.com> wrote:

> On 2009-07-31, nospam <nospam@nospam.invalid> wrote:
> > that's strange. carbon copy cloner and superduper didn't show up?
> 
> Admittedly my eye tended to catch utilities I am familiar with. I've
> used clonezilla many times to clone Windoze XP and Vista systems successfully,
> so I figured if it also works with the Mac, why not?
> 
> > it sounds like it did a block copy leaving the 500 gig drive looking
> > like an 80 gig, which is not what you want.
> 
> I'm not sure if that's what clonezilla did, copy time was much less
> than I would have expected for 80GB to a USB-connected drive, and
> logging indicated a bit more going on under the hood. I think the
> underlying Linux programs used by clonezilla do have some level of
> HPFS+ support, as they do with NTFS.

Minor point: you have the file system name wrong. It is "HFS+"
(Hierarchical File System Plus, also known as "Mac OS Extended"), not
"HPFS+".

"HPFS" (High Performance File System) was the file system used by OS/2.

> (Of course a simple block-for-block copy could have been done using any
> *nix system with dd, nothing special needed for that.)
> 
> The surprise came when I was unable to expand the resulting partition
> on the new drive. Even more surprising was not being able to add
> another partition/filesystem without dire warnings that the existing
> partition would be wiped out.

Apple added support for dynamic resizing of partitions in Disk Utility
for Mac OS X 10.5, but 10.4 didn't have that feature. With 10.4, you
would need to do it with a third party tool.

In 10.5, Disk Utility can't "move" a partition (change the start
position), but it can grow a partition into following free space, and
can shrink partitions. You can also delete partitions, or add new
partitions in free space, without destroying other ones.

> In any event, superduper certainly looks like it should do the job
> if used to redo the cloning.  Am I correct that rather than being
> a standalone bootable utility, it needs to installed and executed
> on the system that is to be copied?

You can't use SuperDuper to clone TO your current startup volume. If you
only have two drives, you must boot from the source drive and run
SuperDuper from that drive.

If you have three drives, you can run SuperDuper on one drive to clone a
bootable system between two other drives.

SuperDuper can't run while the system is booted from DVD.

It is worth noting that the Mac OS X Install DVD includes a copy of Disk
Utility, and its "Restore" feature can be used to copy a bootable system
between two hard drives while booted from DVD.

(I've never tried that - SuperDuper is my preferred method.)

> This being the case, is it possible to boot off the original drive via
> USB? (This would save having to open up the Macbook Pro again to swap the
> original drive back in for cloning.)

It should be possible to boot from USB as long as the OS version is new
enough (10.4.5 or later, I believe).

Easy enough to try: plug the drive in and hold down the Option key while
starting up the computer. It should show an icon for each bootable
drive, and let you pick the one you want to start up from. The
USB-connected drive will have an orange icon with a USB symbol on it.

-- 
David Empson
dempson@actrix.gen.nz
0
dempson (3825)
7/31/2009 5:03:32 AM
In article <1j3q6ki.1pkc2sj7shaupN%dempson@actrix.gen.nz>, David Empson
<dempson@actrix.gen.nz> wrote:

> It should be possible to boot from USB as long as the OS version is new
> enough (10.4.5 or later, I believe).

actually it's intel macs, which implies 10.4.4 or later.
0
nospam59 (11089)
7/31/2009 5:13:46 AM
nospam <nospam@nospam.invalid> wrote:

> In article <1j3q6ki.1pkc2sj7shaupN%dempson@actrix.gen.nz>, David Empson
> <dempson@actrix.gen.nz> wrote:
> 
> > It should be possible to boot from USB as long as the OS version is new
> > enough (10.4.5 or later, I believe).
> 
> actually it's intel macs, which implies 10.4.4 or later.

It is also supported on PowerPC Macs from approximately the same
version, but I haven't tested it to determine the cutoff.

-- 
David Empson
dempson@actrix.gen.nz
0
dempson (3825)
7/31/2009 8:30:09 AM
On 2009-07-31, David Empson <dempson@actrix.gen.nz> wrote:
> Minor point: you have the file system name wrong. It is "HFS+"
> (Hierarchical File System Plus, also known as "Mac OS Extended"), not
> "HPFS+".

Right you are!

> Apple added support for dynamic resizing of partitions in Disk Utility
> for Mac OS X 10.5, but 10.4 didn't have that feature. With 10.4, you
> would need to do it with a third party tool.

Unfortunately we don't have a 10.5 boot disk or install disk available.

Is there a 3rd-party tool available that can expand the existing partition?
That would obviously be easier than cloning the drive again.

> It should be possible to boot from USB as long as the OS version is new
> enough (10.4.5 or later, I believe).

Thanks, I think that's the route we'll take if something can't be found
to resize the existing partition.

-- 
  Roger Blake
  (Subtract 10s for email. "Google Groups" messages killfiled due to spam.)
  "Obama dozed while people froze."
0
rogblake10 (159)
7/31/2009 9:07:23 AM
On 2009-07-31 09:30:09 +0100, dempson@actrix.gen.nz (David Empson) said:

> nospam <nospam@nospam.invalid> wrote:
> 
>> In article <1j3q6ki.1pkc2sj7shaupN%dempson@actrix.gen.nz>, David Empson
>> <dempson@actrix.gen.nz> wrote:
>> 
>>> It should be possible to boot from USB as long as the OS version is new
>>> enough (10.4.5 or later, I believe).
>> 
>> actually it's intel macs, which implies 10.4.4 or later.
> 
> It is also supported on PowerPC Macs from approximately the same
> version, but I haven't tested it to determine the cutoff.

I'm fairly sure it was when Boot Camp was released, as that obviously 
needs the ability to resize HFS+ filesystems. Obviously to shrink them, 
but presumably if you wanted to zap your Windows partition later it can 
make them bigger too.
-- 
Chris

0
chrisridd (687)
7/31/2009 10:42:24 AM
In article <1j3qhx7.1plf2w316j7f76N%dempson@actrix.gen.nz>, David
Empson <dempson@actrix.gen.nz> wrote:

> > > It should be possible to boot from USB as long as the OS version is new
> > > enough (10.4.5 or later, I believe).
> > 
> > actually it's intel macs, which implies 10.4.4 or later.
> 
> It is also supported on PowerPC Macs from approximately the same
> version, but I haven't tested it to determine the cutoff.

it depends on the hardware, not the version of the os. my powerbook g4
could not boot usb, even from leopard.
0
nospam59 (11089)
7/31/2009 2:48:32 PM
In article <slrnh75d1u.nog.rogblake10@otaku.freeshell.org>, Roger Blake
<rogblake10@iname10.com> wrote:

> Is there a 3rd-party tool available that can expand the existing partition?
> That would obviously be easier than cloning the drive again.

clone it with superduper. who knows what the linux tool did with regard
to metadata.
0
nospam59 (11089)
7/31/2009 2:50:25 PM
On 2009-07-31, nospam <nospam@nospam.invalid> wrote:
> clone it with superduper. who knows what the linux tool did with regard
> to metadata.

Good point. Shouldn't be too much of a pain if it will boot off the
old drive via USB.

-- 
  Roger Blake
  (Subtract 10s for email. "Google Groups" messages killfiled due to spam.)
0
rogblake10 (159)
7/31/2009 2:54:20 PM
On 2009-07-31 15:48:32 +0100, nospam <nospam@nospam.invalid> said:

> In article <1j3qhx7.1plf2w316j7f76N%dempson@actrix.gen.nz>, David
> Empson <dempson@actrix.gen.nz> wrote:
> 
>>>> It should be possible to boot from USB as long as the OS version is new
>>>> enough (10.4.5 or later, I believe).
>>> 
>>> actually it's intel macs, which implies 10.4.4 or later.
>> 
>> It is also supported on PowerPC Macs from approximately the same
>> version, but I haven't tested it to determine the cutoff.
> 
> it depends on the hardware, not the version of the os. my powerbook g4
> could not boot usb, even from leopard.

I think he meant partition resizing was supported on PowerPC Macs [etc].
-- 
Chris

0
chrisridd (687)
7/31/2009 3:45:41 PM
David Empson wrote:
> You can't use SuperDuper to clone TO your current startup volume. If you
> only have two drives, you must boot from the source drive and run
> SuperDuper from that drive.

Unless you were clever enough to install a second bootable partition on
one of the drives for cloning and "I clobbered my OS" recovery.  Boot
from that and copy between the other two partitions of interest.  When I
set up my "big" backup drive some years ago, I took a guess and set aside
35G for my backup/recovery partition and tried to install a modestly
minimal OS X.  It has no user accounts, no added applications beyond
SuperDuper and other utilities deemed useful for recovery.  It currently
occupies about 23G.  I think I recently saw an article about setting up
a bootable SD card at 16G.  That should work for a thumb drive too and
they are getting pretty cheap.

> If you have three drives, you can run SuperDuper on one drive to clone a
> bootable system between two other drives.

partitions... :)

> SuperDuper can't run while the system is booted from DVD.

You can't boot from DVD and execute a copy of SD off the source drive?

> It is worth noting that the Mac OS X Install DVD includes a copy of Disk
> Utility, and its "Restore" feature can be used to copy a bootable system
> between two hard drives while booted from DVD.
> 
> (I've never tried that - SuperDuper is my preferred method.)

I've used the "restore" feature to clone. (While booted from an alternate
partition.)  It works fine, but SD or Carbon Copy Cloner (haven't used
under Leopard yet) are user friendlier.

>> This being the case, is it possible to boot off the original drive via
>> USB? (This would save having to open up the Macbook Pro again to swap the
>> original drive back in for cloning.)

 > It should be possible to boot from USB as long as the OS version is new
 > enough (10.4.5 or later, I believe).

Yes, the OP's friend should get an enclosure for the old 80G drive, then
he can use it for backup and/or secondary boot.  A FW capable enclosure
will certainly do the trick.  If he doesn't want to spring for an enclosure,
a USB to IDE/SATA converter can be had for as little as $10, assuming USB
boot works.  I recently picked up a USB enclosure for $7, and put a 25G
drive I salvaged from an old laptop into it.  Instant backup boot drive.

Since the OP's friend has already made an 80g partition on the 500g drive,
why not just make a 420g partition and clone into it.  The 80g can be an
oversized backup boot area.  (Or would that get annoying/confusing because
both partitions would mount at boot.  Can you mark a partition not to
automount or automount read-only.)

-- 
Clem
"If you push something hard enough, it will fall over."
              - Fudd's first law of opposition
0
uhclem (209)
7/31/2009 4:27:20 PM
Mr. Uh Clem <uhclem@DutchElmSt.invalid> wrote:

> David Empson wrote:
> > SuperDuper can't run while the system is booted from DVD.
> 
> You can't boot from DVD and execute a copy of SD off the source drive?

Not as far as I know. How would you achieve running an arbitrary
application on another volume while booted from DVD, when it doesn't
have a general purpose application launcher?

The system on the DVD goes directly into a dedicated application
(typically Installer or one specific third-party utility such as
DiskWarrior).

Installer has menu commands to access a few other specific applications
on the DVD (e.g. Disk Utility).

Terminal is one of the options offered from Installer's Utility menu,
but I doubt it includes the necessary commands to launch an arbitrary
application. Even if it could, the system on the DVD is pruned down to
the minimum required to run the applications on the DVD and could be
missing major bits required by an application such as SuperDuper.

> > It is worth noting that the Mac OS X Install DVD includes a copy of Disk
> > Utility, and its "Restore" feature can be used to copy a bootable system
> > between two hard drives while booted from DVD.
> > 
> > (I've never tried that - SuperDuper is my preferred method.)
> 
> I've used the "restore" feature to clone. (While booted from an alternate
> partition.)  It works fine, but SD or Carbon Copy Cloner (haven't used
> under Leopard yet) are user friendlier.

Agreed.

> Since the OP's friend has already made an 80g partition on the 500g drive,
> why not just make a 420g partition and clone into it.  The 80g can be an
> oversized backup boot area.  (Or would that get annoying/confusing because
> both partitions would mount at boot.  Can you mark a partition not to
> automount or automount read-only.)

Not easily. Mac OS X mounts all available partitions on all connected
drives.

-- 
David Empson
dempson@actrix.gen.nz
0
dempson (3825)
7/31/2009 5:21:23 PM
Chris Ridd <chrisridd@mac.com> wrote:

> On 2009-07-31 15:48:32 +0100, nospam <nospam@nospam.invalid> said:
> 
> > In article <1j3qhx7.1plf2w316j7f76N%dempson@actrix.gen.nz>, David
> > Empson <dempson@actrix.gen.nz> wrote:
> > 
> >>>> It should be possible to boot from USB as long as the OS version is new
> >>>> enough (10.4.5 or later, I believe).
> >>> 
> >>> actually it's intel macs, which implies 10.4.4 or later.
> >> 
> >> It is also supported on PowerPC Macs from approximately the same
> >> version, but I haven't tested it to determine the cutoff.
> > 
> > it depends on the hardware, not the version of the os. my powerbook g4
> > could not boot usb, even from leopard.
> 
> I think he meant partition resizing was supported on PowerPC Macs [etc].

No, I was talking about booting PowerPC Macs from USB.

I've done it with my PowerMac G4 (QuickSilver 2002) just to prove that
it worked. It can boot from the built-in USB 1.1 port (awfully slow) and
from a USB 2.0 PCI card, with drives containing 10.4.11 or 10.5.

It was generally known that early versions of Mac OS X could not boot
from USB: it would lock up during boot, due to Mac OS X reinitializing
the USB bus and losing track of the startup drive.

Mac OS 9 could boot from USB, at least on models from around the iMac DV
and PowerMac G4 (AGP Graphics), if not the earliest ones with built-in
USB.

I haven't done enough testing to establish exactly what combinations of
versions of Mac OS X and PowerPC Mac models support this, but it is my
belief that the compatibility issue was fixed around Mac OS X 10.4.4 or
10.4.5, allowing most if not all PowerPC Macs to boot from USB (only
from an Apple Partition Table drive, of course).

There may be some models that lacked firmware support for USB booting at
all, most likely after support for booting Mac OS 9 was dropped (which
was at some stage in 2003 depending on the model). I don't own any
PowerPC Macs which are recent enough to prove or disprove this, but
could test it on someone else's computer if nobody else beats me to it.

-- 
David Empson
dempson@actrix.gen.nz
0
dempson (3825)
7/31/2009 5:21:23 PM
In article <slrnh74b88.im9.rogblake10@otaku.freeshell.org>,
 Roger Blake <rogblake10@iname10.com> wrote:

> I helped a friend install an upgraded hard drive in a Macbook Pro
> using a 500GB drive to replace the old 80GB unit. We sucessfully copied
> the old drive to the new using "Clonezilla" (a Linux-based disk cloning
> utility), but have run into a brick wall as far as utilizing the additional
> space, we seem to be stuck with using just the original 80GB. The Mac
> is currently running OS X 10.4.11. Its command-line diskutil only offered to
> shrink the existing partition, not expand it.
..
..
..
> One program we found called "iPartition" seems like it may be able to
> do this. Has anyone here used iPartition successfully? Any other
> recommendations?

Roger-

It sounds like you can go ahead and try iPartition, and not be any worse 
off than you already are!  I assume you still have the original 80GB HD.

To try again from scratch, I would re-initialize the new HD with the 
partition map you want to end up with, with the boot partition formatted 
the way OS X wants it.  Then boot from an OSX System Install disk and 
run its Disk Utility.

Select the old HD and click on the Restore tab.  Drag the old HD boot 
volume to the Source window.  Drag the new HD boot partition to the 
Destination window.  Click the checkbox for Erase Destination and click 
on Restore.

It takes a while, but that should do it.  If there are other partitions 
on the old HD, you may have to repeat the process for each.

Fred
0
fmmck (557)
7/31/2009 8:43:27 PM
In article <slrnh74b88.im9.rogblake10@otaku.freeshell.org>,
 Roger Blake <rogblake10@iname10.com> wrote:

> One program we found called "iPartition" seems like it may be able to
> do this. Has anyone here used iPartition successfully? Any other
> recommendations?

Roger-

If you still have the original 80GB HD available, then iPartition might 
be worth a try.

In similar circumstances, I have done things a little differently.  I 
would first partition the new HD the way I wanted it, with the new boot 
partition formatted to suit OS X.  I would boot the machine using the OS 
X installation disk and run its Disk Utility.

In Disk Utility, I would select the old HD and click on the Restore tab.  
Then drag the old HD's boot partition to the Source: window, the new 
HD's boot partition to the Destination: window, check the Erase 
destination box and click on Restore.  It usually takes a while, but it 
gets the job done.

If the old HD had additional partitions, it might be necessary to repeat 
the process for each.

Fred
0
fmmck (557)
8/1/2009 1:42:12 AM
In article <1j3r6kn.xugr2d157tymvN%dempson@actrix.gen.nz>, David Empson
<dempson@actrix.gen.nz> wrote:

> No, I was talking about booting PowerPC Macs from USB.
> 
> I've done it with my PowerMac G4 (QuickSilver 2002) just to prove that
> it worked. It can boot from the built-in USB 1.1 port (awfully slow) and
> from a USB 2.0 PCI card, with drives containing 10.4.11 or 10.5.

i find that very surprising, particularly from a pci card, since my
powerbook g4 (2005) will not boot from usb.
0
nospam59 (11089)
8/1/2009 4:54:10 PM
nospam <nospam@nospam.invalid> wrote:

> In article <1j3r6kn.xugr2d157tymvN%dempson@actrix.gen.nz>, David Empson
> <dempson@actrix.gen.nz> wrote:
> 
> > No, I was talking about booting PowerPC Macs from USB.
> > 
> > I've done it with my PowerMac G4 (QuickSilver 2002) just to prove that
> > it worked. It can boot from the built-in USB 1.1 port (awfully slow) and
> > from a USB 2.0 PCI card, with drives containing 10.4.11 or 10.5.
> 
> i find that very surprising, particularly from a pci card, since my
> powerbook g4 (2005) will not boot from usb.

I was visiting someone today who had several PowerPC Macs and I took my
external drive with me. It has Firewire 800 and USB 2.0 ports on the
enclosure, and two partitions with 10.4.8 (plus 9.2.2) and 10.5.

This was sufficient to prove that the question of PowerPC booting into
Mac OS X isn't a simple one.

Given the evidence I have so far, the situation appears to be:

- Models from around 2000 cannot reliably boot Mac OS X 10.4.8 from USB,
but can boot Mac OS X 10.5 from USB.

- Models from around 2002 to late 2003 can boot both Mac OS X 10.4.8 and
10.5 from USB. This includes some models which can boot Mac OS 9 and
some which cannot.

- Models from around mid 2004 to 2005 cannot boot from USB at all.

The behaviour may vary depending on the specific series.

My test computers:

1. PowerMac G4 (Gigabit Ethernet), with final firmware update (4.2.8f1).
Mid 2000.

2. PowerMac G4 (QuickSilver 2002). Early 2002.

3. PowerBook G4 15" (FW800). First aluminium 15" model, introduced late
2003.

4. PowerMac G5 (June 2004). Second PowerMac G5 generation.

Add in nospam's one, which so far is known to be a PowerBook G4 made in
2005, but could be any of five series (one 12", two 15" and two 17"),
some of which might behave differently, and I don't know whether the USB
drive in question might have other issues which prevent it booting.

I can also dig out an iMac G3 (400 MHz with Firewire from late 1999) to
try, but probably won't get around to it tonight. It won't boot 10.5, of
course.

On [1], System Preferences > Startup Disk didn't offer the Mac OS X
systems on the USB drive, but I was able to select them from the Option
key startup screen. Booting from 10.4.8 via USB appeared to work but it
somehow switched to booting from the internal drive part way through the
startup sequence. I didn't have time to investigate in detail, and
didn't try booting from Firewire. 10.5 booted from USB.

On [2] and [3], everything works. [2] can also boot Mac OS 9, [3] can't.

On [4], System Preferences > Startup Disk didn't offer any systems on
the USB drive, and neither did the Option key startup screen, but I was
able to boot either 10.4.8 or 10.5 via Firewire from the same drive.

-- 
David Empson
dempson@actrix.gen.nz
0
dempson (3825)
8/2/2009 7:40:44 AM
In article <1j3ty8j.pifxph3s33mbN%dempson@actrix.gen.nz>, David Empson
<dempson@actrix.gen.nz> wrote:

> I was visiting someone today who had several PowerPC Macs and I took my
> external drive with me. It has Firewire 800 and USB 2.0 ports on the
> enclosure, and two partitions with 10.4.8 (plus 9.2.2) and 10.5.
> 
> This was sufficient to prove that the question of PowerPC booting into
> Mac OS X isn't a simple one.

apparently not.

> Given the evidence I have so far, the situation appears to be:
> 
> - Models from around 2000 cannot reliably boot Mac OS X 10.4.8 from USB,
> but can boot Mac OS X 10.5 from USB.

odd. i didn't try it with 10.5 and am surprised it makes a difference
since the computer would need to know to look on usb to find the boot
volume.

> - Models from around 2002 to late 2003 can boot both Mac OS X 10.4.8 and
> 10.5 from USB. This includes some models which can boot Mac OS 9 and
> some which cannot.

not my experience.

> - Models from around mid 2004 to 2005 cannot boot from USB at all.

that is my experience.

> Add in nospam's one, which so far is known to be a PowerBook G4 made in
> 2005, but could be any of five series (one 12", two 15" and two 17"),
> some of which might behave differently, and I don't know whether the USB
> drive in question might have other issues which prevent it booting.

early 2005 i think is the official name. 15" 1.67 ghz, 2nd to last
version (not the dual layer one). also, add an old 2001 ibook to the
mix. they definitely didn't boot from usb while the same drive did boot
an intel mini (and oh so slowly).
0
nospam59 (11089)
8/2/2009 6:14:49 PM
nospam <nospam@nospam.invalid> wrote:

> In article <1j3ty8j.pifxph3s33mbN%dempson@actrix.gen.nz>, David Empson
> <dempson@actrix.gen.nz> wrote:
> 
> > Given the evidence I have so far, the situation appears to be:
> > 
> > - Models from around 2000 cannot reliably boot Mac OS X 10.4.8 from USB,
> > but can boot Mac OS X 10.5 from USB.
> 
> odd. i didn't try it with 10.5 and am surprised it makes a difference
> since the computer would need to know to look on usb to find the boot
> volume.

The PowerMac I used gets that far, i.e. the Option key startup disk
selector allowed me to pick a 10.4.8 or 10.5 system on a USB drive. It
just didn't boot from 10.4.8 (but I'd need to run some more tests to
work out exactly what happened).

> > Add in nospam's one, which so far is known to be a PowerBook G4 made in
> > 2005, but could be any of five series (one 12", two 15" and two 17"),
> > some of which might behave differently, and I don't know whether the USB
> > drive in question might have other issues which prevent it booting.
> 
> early 2005 i think is the official name. 15" 1.67 ghz, 2nd to last
> version (not the dual layer one).

Probably falls into the same camp as the 2004 PowerMac G5 I tested.

My evidence suggests that Apple removed firmware support for USB booting
at some point, though I don't have enough information to determine a
cutoff point for each series. It came back again with Intel processors.

There is a small possibility that it might have resurfaced with the last
series of some PowerPC models (no evidence either way, yet).

> also, add an old 2001 ibook to the mix. they definitely didn't boot from
> usb while the same drive did boot an intel mini (and oh so slowly).

I assume you were testing with different systems on two partitions of
the same drive, and the drive was partitioned using Apple Partition Map.

No other combination would have worked. There is no system version which
is able to boot both an Intel Mini and a 2001 iBook G3. (The iBook can't
boot 10.5, and 10.4 isn't Universal.)

PowerPC Macs can only boot from Apple Partition Map (except the last
series of PowerMac G5s, which also recognise GUID Partition Table).

-- 
David Empson
dempson@actrix.gen.nz
0
dempson (3825)
8/2/2009 10:33:38 PM
In article <1j3vahl.sef2cbnfhrk6N%dempson@actrix.gen.nz>, David Empson
<dempson@actrix.gen.nz> wrote:

> > > - Models from around 2000 cannot reliably boot Mac OS X 10.4.8 from USB,
> > > but can boot Mac OS X 10.5 from USB.
> > 
> > odd. i didn't try it with 10.5 and am surprised it makes a difference
> > since the computer would need to know to look on usb to find the boot
> > volume.
> 
> The PowerMac I used gets that far, i.e. the Option key startup disk
> selector allowed me to pick a 10.4.8 or 10.5 system on a USB drive. It
> just didn't boot from 10.4.8 (but I'd need to run some more tests to
> work out exactly what happened).

then it doesn't boot from usb. :) it's probably seeing a valid system
on the drive, not realizing it can't actually boot from it. 

however, from what i understand, powerpc macs *can* boot from usb if
the user is an open firmware geek and can configure it appropriately.
out of the box, no.

> > also, add an old 2001 ibook to the mix. they definitely didn't boot from
> > usb while the same drive did boot an intel mini (and oh so slowly).
> 
> I assume you were testing with different systems on two partitions of
> the same drive, and the drive was partitioned using Apple Partition Map.
> 
> No other combination would have worked. There is no system version which
> is able to boot both an Intel Mini and a 2001 iBook G3. (The iBook can't
> boot 10.5, and 10.4 isn't Universal.)

it was an ibook g3 & powerbook g4 with tiger ppc on an external usb
drive. it turned out that tiger was too slow for the ibook (booted off
fw, the enclosure had both) so i never upgraded the internal drive.
0
nospam59 (11089)
8/2/2009 10:58:52 PM
nospam <nospam@nospam.invalid> wrote:

> In article <1j3vahl.sef2cbnfhrk6N%dempson@actrix.gen.nz>, David Empson
> <dempson@actrix.gen.nz> wrote:
> 
> > > > - Models from around 2000 cannot reliably boot Mac OS X 10.4.8 from USB,
> > > > but can boot Mac OS X 10.5 from USB.
> > > 
> > > odd. i didn't try it with 10.5 and am surprised it makes a difference
> > > since the computer would need to know to look on usb to find the boot
> > > volume.
> > 
> > The PowerMac I used gets that far, i.e. the Option key startup disk
> > selector allowed me to pick a 10.4.8 or 10.5 system on a USB drive. It
> > just didn't boot from 10.4.8 (but I'd need to run some more tests to
> > work out exactly what happened).
> 
> then it doesn't boot from usb. :)

Yes it does - it booted from 10.5. I just haven't worked out why it
couldn't also boot from 10.4.8.

Ironically this model (PMG4 "Gigabit Ethernet") is too old/slow to be
officially supported by 10.5. :-)

> however, from what i understand, powerpc macs *can* boot from usb if
> the user is an open firmware geek and can configure it appropriately.
> out of the box, no.

All PowerPC machines I have successfully booted from USB (three so far
with 10.5, two with 10.4.8) have no Open Firwmare tweaks. It just worked
out of the box (for those models).

-- 
David Empson
dempson@actrix.gen.nz
0
dempson (3825)
8/3/2009 12:00:30 AM
In article <1j3vez1.j06iln152ewu8N%dempson@actrix.gen.nz>, David Empson
<dempson@actrix.gen.nz> wrote:

> All PowerPC machines I have successfully booted from USB (three so far
> with 10.5, two with 10.4.8) have no Open Firwmare tweaks. It just worked
> out of the box (for those models).

that's exactly opposite from my experience, including the pbg4 from
leopard.
0
nospam59 (11089)
8/3/2009 1:33:43 AM
dempson@actrix.gen.nz (David Empson) writes:

>PowerPC Macs can only boot from Apple Partition Map (except the last
>series of PowerMac G5s, which also recognise GUID Partition Table).

Does this include the quads?

--
      Cameron Kaiser * ckaiser@floodgap.com * posting with a Commodore 128
                 personal page: http://www.cameronkaiser.com/
  ** Computer Workshops: games, productivity software and more for C64/128! **
                  ** http://www.armory.com/%7Espectre/cwi/ **
0
ckaiser (667)
8/3/2009 2:15:02 AM
Cameron Kaiser <ckaiser@floodgap.com> wrote:

> dempson@actrix.gen.nz (David Empson) writes:
> 
> >PowerPC Macs can only boot from Apple Partition Map (except the last
> >series of PowerMac G5s, which also recognise GUID Partition Table).
> 
> Does this include the quads?

I don't have one of the machines in question, and haven't confirmed it
myself, but in an earlier discussion someone else who does have one said
that at least one of the models in the late 2005 series of PowerMac G5
could boot from a drive partitioned using GUID Partition Table, but none
of the tools running under Mac OS X would admit to that (e.g. Startup
Disk couldn't select a system on a GPT partition).

If it works for one model in that series I expect it would work for all
of them, as they are running the same firmware.

-- 
David Empson
dempson@actrix.gen.nz
0
dempson (3825)
8/3/2009 5:14:39 AM
On Sun, 2 Aug 2009 21:33:43 -0400, nospam wrote
(in article <020820091833431150%nospam@nospam.invalid>):

> In article <1j3vez1.j06iln152ewu8N%dempson@actrix.gen.nz>, David Empson
> <dempson@actrix.gen.nz> wrote:
> 
>> All PowerPC machines I have successfully booted from USB (three so far
>> with 10.5, two with 10.4.8) have no Open Firwmare tweaks. It just worked
>> out of the box (for those models).
> 
> that's exactly opposite from my experience, including the pbg4 from
> leopard.

I've booted a number of older Macs, up to beige G3s, from USB. I was never 
able to get a B&W G3 to boot from USB, so I figured that Apple had pulled the 
ability to do that until I saw this thread. I've since tried to boot an eMac 
from USB and it worked. The drive had to be partitioned with the Apple 
Partition Map, though.

-- 
email to oshea dot j dot j at gmail dot com.

0
try.not.to (2779)
8/3/2009 10:52:34 AM
J.J. O'Shea <try.not.to@but.see.sig> wrote:

> On Sun, 2 Aug 2009 21:33:43 -0400, nospam wrote
> (in article <020820091833431150%nospam@nospam.invalid>):
> 
> > In article <1j3vez1.j06iln152ewu8N%dempson@actrix.gen.nz>, David Empson
> > <dempson@actrix.gen.nz> wrote:
> > 
> >> All PowerPC machines I have successfully booted from USB (three so far
> >> with 10.5, two with 10.4.8) have no Open Firwmare tweaks. It just worked
> >> out of the box (for those models).
> > 
> > that's exactly opposite from my experience, including the pbg4 from
> > leopard.
> 
> I've booted a number of older Macs, up to beige G3s, from USB.

What PCI card were you using? Beige G3s and earlier didn't have USB
support at all in the firwmare, so I expect you would have needed a card
with Mac-specific firmware on it, and it probably had to emulate a SCSI
card for the firmware to recognise it as bootable.

> I was never able to get a B&W G3 to boot from USB, so I figured that Apple
> had pulled the ability to do that until I saw this thread.

The B&W G3 was the first pro desktop model with built-in USB and support
for it in firwmare. It wouldn't surprise me if it was missing features
such as booting from USB. Early iMacs probably have the same limitation.

The new world architecture didn't really settle down until the PowerMac
G4 (AGP Graphics), iMac DV and PowerBook G3 (Firewire), all of which had
firmware upgrades that mentioned improvements to USB and Firewire
support.

> I've since tried to boot an eMac from USB and it worked. The drive had to
> be partitioned with the Apple Partition Map, though.

If you can identify which eMac model it is, that would be a useful data
point for my survey.

-- 
David Empson
dempson@actrix.gen.nz
0
dempson (3825)
8/3/2009 4:14:46 PM
In article <h56fhj11vr4@news2.newsguy.com>, J.J. O'Shea
<try.not.to@but.see.sig> wrote:

> I've booted a number of older Macs, up to beige G3s, from USB. 

that would be before os x, which does work.

> I was never 
> able to get a B&W G3 to boot from USB, so I figured that Apple had pulled the 
> ability to do that until I saw this thread. I've since tried to boot an eMac 
> from USB and it worked. The drive had to be partitioned with the Apple 
> Partition Map, though.

os 9 or os x?
0
nospam59 (11089)
8/3/2009 4:24:06 PM
On Mon, 3 Aug 2009 12:14:46 -0400, David Empson wrote
(in article <1j3wnnh.18tzh7c1tjzh12N%dempson@actrix.gen.nz>):

> J.J. O'Shea <try.not.to@but.see.sig> wrote:
> 
>> On Sun, 2 Aug 2009 21:33:43 -0400, nospam wrote
>> (in article <020820091833431150%nospam@nospam.invalid>):
>> 
>>> In article <1j3vez1.j06iln152ewu8N%dempson@actrix.gen.nz>, David Empson
>>> <dempson@actrix.gen.nz> wrote:
>>> 
>>>> All PowerPC machines I have successfully booted from USB (three so far
>>>> with 10.5, two with 10.4.8) have no Open Firwmare tweaks. It just worked
>>>> out of the box (for those models).
>>> 
>>> that's exactly opposite from my experience, including the pbg4 from
>>> leopard.
>> 
>> I've booted a number of older Macs, up to beige G3s, from USB.
> 
> What PCI card were you using?

A Sonnet combo card, with USB and FireWire ports on board.

> Beige G3s and earlier didn't have USB
> support at all in the firwmare, so I expect you would have needed a card
> with Mac-specific firmware on it, and it probably had to emulate a SCSI
> card for the firmware to recognise it as bootable.

Yeah, it thought it was SCSI.

> 
>> I was never able to get a B&W G3 to boot from USB, so I figured that Apple
>> had pulled the ability to do that until I saw this thread.
> 
> The B&W G3 was the first pro desktop model with built-in USB and support
> for it in firwmare. It wouldn't surprise me if it was missing features
> such as booting from USB. Early iMacs probably have the same limitation.
> 
> The new world architecture didn't really settle down until the PowerMac
> G4 (AGP Graphics), iMac DV and PowerBook G3 (Firewire), all of which had
> firmware upgrades that mentioned improvements to USB and Firewire
> support.
> 
>> I've since tried to boot an eMac from USB and it worked. The drive had to
>> be partitioned with the Apple Partition Map, though.
> 
> If you can identify which eMac model it is, that would be a useful data
> point for my survey.
> 
> 

A first-generation 700 MHz unit.

-- 
email to oshea dot j dot j at gmail dot com.

0
try.not.to (2779)
8/3/2009 5:48:20 PM
On Mon, 3 Aug 2009 12:24:06 -0400, nospam wrote
(in article <030820090924060055%nospam@nospam.invalid>):

> In article <h56fhj11vr4@news2.newsguy.com>, J.J. O'Shea
> <try.not.to@but.see.sig> wrote:
> 
>> I've booted a number of older Macs, up to beige G3s, from USB. 
> 
> that would be before os x, which does work.
> 
>> I was never 
>> able to get a B&W G3 to boot from USB, so I figured that Apple had pulled 
>> the 
>> ability to do that until I saw this thread. I've since tried to boot an 
>> eMac 
>> from USB and it worked. The drive had to be partitioned with the Apple 
>> Partition Map, though.
> 
> os 9 or os x?

OS X.

-- 
email to oshea dot j dot j at gmail dot com.

0
try.not.to (2779)
8/3/2009 5:48:36 PM
On 2009-07-31, nospam <nospam@nospam.invalid> wrote:
> clone it with superduper. who knows what the linux tool did with regard
> to metadata.

To followup, today I finally got to try cloning the drive again.

What I did was to boot off the Macbook's original drive connected via USB
and install superduper. At that point it was still not possible to
repartition the new drive as it was still being seen as a startup disk.

So I booted up temporarily on a Linux CD and used dd to clear the
partition table on the new drive. After that there was no problem
partitioning the drive and cloning to it from OS X.

Worked great, the Macbook is now up an running and using the full capacity
of the new 500GB drive. Thanks for the help!

-- 
  Roger Blake
  (Subtract 10s for email. "Google Groups" messages killfiled due to spam.)
0
rogblake10 (159)
8/7/2009 2:11:32 AM
In article <slrnh74b88.im9.rogblake10@otaku.freeshell.org>,
 Roger Blake <rogblake10@iname10.com> wrote:

> I'll preface this by saying I am not a Mac expert by any stretch of
> the imagination. (Though I have worked with Unix systems for over
> 30 years and feel at home with the Mac command line.)
> 
> I helped a friend install an upgraded hard drive in a Macbook Pro
> using a 500GB drive to replace the old 80GB unit. We sucessfully copied
> the old drive to the new using "Clonezilla" (a Linux-based disk cloning
> utility), but have run into a brick wall as far as utilizing the additional
> space, we seem to be stuck with using just the original 80GB. The Mac
> is currently running OS X 10.4.11. Its command-line diskutil only offered to
> shrink the existing partition, not expand it.
> 
> Nothing I've found so far has been able to enlarge the HPFS+
> partition, or for that matter even add another partition without
> wiping out the contents of the drive. (This is very frustrating
> since this is a trivial operation in Linux and Windows.)
> 
> Obviously the worst-case scenario here is to just bite the bullet and
> reload everything from scratch to make use of the entire drive, but
> we are trying to avoid that! Are there any utility programs available
> that can expand the Mac's boot partition, or at least non-destructively add
> additional partitions to the drive to make the additional space usable?
> 
> One program we found called "iPartition" seems like it may be able to
> do this. Has anyone here used iPartition successfully? Any other
> recommendations?

http://www.macgeekery.com/tips/cli/nondestructively_resizing_volumes

You can use the Disk Utility GUI to do it as well.  You should be booted 
to another drive, IMO.  I'd boot to the install disc and then go to Disk 
Utility from there (in the Utilities menu).  It might be as simple as a 
drag if you do it there.

It may not let you do it, however, as you made a critical error by 
copying the partition map to the new drive.  It probably thinks it's 
still the old size drive at a lower level than diskutil/Disk Utility 
want to edit.

You might be able to get around that in Disk Utility (the GUI) by 
selecting the disk and selecting Partition and changing Current to 1 
Volume.  It SHOULD rewrite/update the pmap at that time.  Take note if 
it says it will destroy a volume or not -- it's telling the truth.  MAKE 
SURE YOU HAVE A BACKUP BEFORE DOING THIS. :)

Your best bet is to redo the copy using Disk Utility's Restore feature 
with both disks mounted and the new one repartitioned and erased (you 
will need an external case to do that on the MBP).  It's a file-by-file 
copy, but it's rather fast and is perfectly accurate, unlike a 
file-by-file would be in Linux for an HFS+ FS.  You will not have the 
size issue in this case.
0
cp96 (57)
8/20/2009 5:37:46 PM
Reply:

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Hey all Looking for some help. I am trying to use a 6-6pin 1394 cable to connect two iBooks together and transfer some large files. iBook 1 dual USB 'white' iBook OS 9.2 iBook 2 G4 OSx 10.2 I boot iBook 1 into 'target drive' mode and get the firewire icon dancing about the screen then connect it to iBook 2 but the drive does not appear on the desktop. I have tried all combinations of rebooting/ connecting before and after rebooting but nothing seams to work. When the firewire is plugged in the target disk makes a short noise then nothing the host does not appear to react at ...

networking mac to mac???
Hello, Can someone out there tell me the best (easy) way to network a ibook running os.9??? possibly to a new imac running osx 5wak <rosscoism@gmail.com> wrote: > Hello, Can someone out there tell me the best (easy) way to network a > ibook running os.9??? possibly to a new imac running osx Put an ethernet cable between them, enable tcp/ip and file sharing on one and log on from the other, seems to be what you are asking for? And you do not need a cross-over cable between modern Macs. -- /Jon For contact info, run the following in Terminal: echo 361993718603049801070734...

mac to mac connection
Hi, PBG3 400 OS 10.3 I connect a crossover cable between my PB, and other macs running OS9, and can not mount see the other mac on my PB. Have followed the Help, but must be doing something wrong somewhere. I can however see/connect to my PB from the peripheral mac via the Chooser. I have not been able to connect to windoze machines either, but maybe that will rsolve if I can get mac to mac sharing happening. Can someone suggest what I may be overlooking or a relevant site... ? thanks indeed Chris Brown Neurosurgery University of Adelaide In article <400da705$1@yorrell.saard.net>, Chris Brown <cbrown@medicine.adelaide.edu.au> wrote: > Hi, > > > PBG3 400 OS 10.3 > > I connect a crossover cable between my PB, and other macs running OS9, > and can not mount see the other mac on my PB. Have followed the Help, > but must be doing something wrong somewhere. I can however see/connect > to my PB from the peripheral mac via the Chooser. > > I have not been able to connect to windoze machines either, but maybe > that will rsolve if I can get mac to mac sharing happening. > > Can someone suggest what I may be overlooking or a relevant site... ? > > > thanks indeed > > Chris Brown > Neurosurgery > University of Adelaide > Chris, things won't necessarily connect automagically. First, you have to turn on "File Sharing" on both machines. If you have an OS 9 box, when y...

Mac Miail on .mac
I have my own domain name. Is there a way to get msil under .mac to set this as the reply to address. It seems that I am forced to use the @mac address but I could well be missing something. Thanks Colin Countryman wrote: > I have my own domain name. Is there a way to get msil under .mac to set this > as the reply to address. It seems that I am forced to use the @mac address > but I could well be missing something. > > Thanks > Colin Open a new Mail message - press Command-Alt-R to display the Reply-To field. Chu -- chuenginsberg at mac dot com On Sun, 21 Jan 2...

MAC to MAC over Internet
Hi All, First I will tell you that I am not a MAC user or owner so please be patient :) I have a friend who runs a small business and they have two MAC computers in the office that are networked together and share files. The main MAC has approx 20,000 files that they share and update. One of the people will be moving away and they want to be able to connect over the Internet to the main MAC and share the files just like they do in the office today. They need to be able to have the master files on the main MAC in the office and allow the other person to easily access and update the master ...

MAC to MAC connectivity
Hi, As part of a design that I'm investigating, I am looking at connecting a number of FPGA based MACs to a dedicated broadcom switch chip. The difficulty with this is that to interface both chips, I need to have two closely coupled and redundant PHY . Is it possible to connect two MAC (SGMII) directly point-to-point, bypassing the PHY completely? Or is it necessary to have at least some PHY functionality, even if it is a point to point link? Kind regards, Stephen Steve wrote: > Hi, > > As part of a design that I'm investigating, I am looking at connecting > a number...

When is a Mac no longer a Mac?
OK, so Apple's going to go to Intel CPUs. Now Macs are no longer differentiated by a slow clock and superior instruction set--we've got the same hackjob clusterfuck on speed PCs have been using for decades now. And over the last few years Apple's gone away from SCSI, NuBus, ADB, Localtalk, etc. And PCs have picked up USB, dropped floppies, and colored their cases. The hardware's basically merging between the two platforms. On the software side, the classic MacOS is gone, replaced by Unixy stuff. And like it or not, higher up on the UI level lots of Windows-li...

change mac address get mac address spoofing mac address find computer by mac address
Mac Address Spoofing Report Victor J. Canny D. Abstract: Mac address can uniquely identifies each node of a network, ISPs and network administrators use mac address to manage their pc users. PC users may want to spoof mac address so that he need not to contact with ISP for a new network interface card (NIC); PC users may want to hide his mac address so that totally hide his information on the internet. Introduction Mac address, short for Media Access Control address, is a hardware address that uniquely identifies each node of a network. It means, in a local area network (LAN) or oth...

Transferring hardware from Mac to Mac, reactivating OS X not necessary
I acquired a 733MHz Quicksilver (2001) yesterday. I transferred the four hard drives, the CompUSA 5 port USB 2 card and the Sonnett Tempo ATA133 IDE card from the Sawtooth to the Quicksilver. The QS booted without issues, the hardware showed up properly in System Proflier, and I am able to access the Web, newsgroups and email. The only thing I had to re enter was the Drive Genius serial. And most important, I did not have to reactivate Tiger. I wonder why, Wintrolls. Just one more reason OS X is superior to Windoze. Chance Furlong wrote: > I acquired a 733MHz Quicksilver (2001...

WTT: C64 and Mac Hardware for Amiga, Mac, or PC HW:
Due to a lack of space in my apartment I am selling all my C64 equipment. All of this equipment works and has been tested. I would like to trade it for either Some Amiga, PC or Mac HW. Commodore Commodore C1581 Commodore C64 Commodore C64C Commodore C1702 Commodore C1541 II Commodore C1670 Modem Supra Sonic 14.4K Modem X 3 Mac Stuff Power Mac 7200 Upgraded with PM7600 Motherboard A NewerTech G3-275MHZ PCI Processor card 178MB RAM 1.2GB SCSI HD with OS9.1 installed. 9GB SCSI HD with OS X, 10.2.8 installed(Yes really!) CD-ROM Drive, its either or 6X or 16X, I forget which. 4MB ATI Videocard ...

Mac tablet builder comments on Mac OS X for generic hardware
Not an amazing article, but the end summarizes one perspective nicely: http://www.axiotron.com/index.php?id=36&tx_ttnews[tt_news]=73&tx_ttnews[ backPid]=2&cHash=6497edc900 On Thu, 15 Mar 2007 20:04:40 -1000, Mitch <mitch@hawaii.rr> chose to bless us with the following wisdom: >Not an amazing article, but the end summarizes one perspective nicely: > >http://www.axiotron.com/index.php?id=36&tx_ttnews[tt_news]=73&tx_ttnews[ >backPid]=2&cHash=6497edc900 (Insert Polaski whining about not using TinyURL here.) -- "A president who breaks the law i...

Resize partition without Mac OS cd
Hi, I got an old G3 Powerbook 300 MHz (old world) from a friend running Mac Os 8.6 but without any CD. I'm trying to install Yellow Dog Linux 4.0 on it, I managed to launch the YDL setup by using a kernel file posted on the YLD board website. However, YLD doesnt seem to allow me to resize my existing partition and create a new one, and I didn't find any free tool for doing that. Actually I don't care about my Mac OS partition, but I read that I need t keep it because an old world powerbook cant run another OS on its own. Do you know if there is a way for me to get the part...

Installing MATLAB on both sides of partition Boot Camp MAC
I have a copy of MATLAB that I was hoping to use on both my Windows and OSX side of my MAC. I haven't activated bootcamp yet (haven't installed windows yet, that is). Is there a way of doing this since it is on the same computer (isn't it registered to the same serial number?) Also.. this is a second try, I got sent back here from the mac forum, so please don't reply with "go to the mac forum." Thanks! "Anna " <afrench1987@gmail.com> wrote in message news:i14utc$sa0$1@fred.mathworks.com... >I have a copy of MATLAB that I was hoping to u...

Resize partition for Linux without Mac OS cd
Hi, I got an old G3 Powerbook 300 MHz (old world) from a friend running Mac Os 8.6 but without any CD. I'm trying to install Yellow Dog 4.0 on it, I managed to launch the YDL setup by using a kernel file posted on the YLD board website. However, YLD doesnt seem to allow me to resize my existing partition and create a new one, and I didn't find any free tool for doing that. Actually I don't care about my Mac OS partition, but I read that I need t keep it because an old world powerbook cant run another OS on its own. Do you know if there is a way for me to get the partition ...

Web resources about - Resizing (enlarging) Mac boot partition? - comp.sys.mac.hardware.storage

Partition and secession in California - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
After the California Constitutional Convention of 1849 applied for statehood in the current boundaries, the South reluctantly acceded to a single, ...


Explainer: Malcolm Turnbull and the incendiary idea to partition Iraq
This week, Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull raised eyebrows by professing openness to a very controversial idea. He&nbsp;suggested that a partition ...

[Ermahgerd] Verizon Apps Spotted On The Nexus 6's System Partition After The Android 5.1 Update, Rustled ...
The Internet is in the midst of having a mini hemorrhage over something that, basically, doesn't matter. Shocking, right? It appears that a few ...

Restore files, partitions, broken PCs with Lazesoft Recovery Suite
... That’s all the more surprising when you see how much the program can do. It’s able to recover everything from individual files to entire partitions; ...

How to partition your drive before installing Windows 10
Want to test Windows 10 on your PC? Create a hard drive partition for a worry-free install.

Paragon Software Releases Partition Manager 15
Partition Manager 15 software comes with file system converters to adapt the most common file systems including NTFS, HFS+, and FAT.

Iraq: The 'idea of a soft partition came from the US'
Is Iraq headed towards a partition? The rise of the Islamic State group has highlighted the weakness of the central power.Myriam Benraad is a ...

Jat stir revives Partition nightmare for Rohtak residents
The violent Jat quota agitation has revived painful memories of Partition for many people caught in the two conflicts separated by seven decades. ...

How to partition your Mac to test OS X El Capitan
OS X El Capitan may be in Public Beta now, but that doesn't mean it's 100 percent stable. Here's how to put it somewhere it can't cause problems. ...

Resources last updated: 3/1/2016 9:02:39 AM