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Difference /Library/Fonts and /System/Library/Fonts

What is the functional difference between putting stuff into the follwoing
two directories
  /Library/Fonts/
  /System/Library/Fonts/

-- 
  Hans Aberg
0
haberg
5/14/2005 9:54:13 AM
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In article 
<haberg-1405051154160001@c83-250-195-133.bredband.comhem.se>,
 haberg@math.su.se (Hans Aberg) wrote:

> What is the functional difference between putting stuff into the follwoing
> two directories
>   /Library/Fonts/
>   /System/Library/Fonts/

The difference is that you shouldn't put anything under /System unless 
you know you should. And even then double-check. That's Apple's sandbox. 
For the specific case of fonts, /Library/Fonts is the correct place to 
put one that you want to be available to all users.

G

-- 
Goal 2005: Convincing James Hetfield to cover the Strawberry Shortcake
"Are You Berry Berry Happy?" song.
0
Gregory
5/14/2005 10:59:11 AM
In article <uce-9AA348.06591114052005@comcast.dca.giganews.com>, Gregory
Weston <uce@splook.com> wrote:
> > What is the functional difference between putting stuff into the follwoing
> > two directories
> >   /Library/Fonts/
> >   /System/Library/Fonts/
> 
> The difference is that you shouldn't put anything under /System unless 
> you know you should. And even then double-check. That's Apple's sandbox. 
> For the specific case of fonts, /Library/Fonts is the correct place to 
> put one that you want to be available to all users.

Thank you very much. I guess the /System/Library stuff might get erased in
system installs, whereas the /Library stuff is up to applications and
users what to do about it. I noticed that putting stuff in /System/Library
requires administration password, whereas /Library doesn't.

-- 
  Hans Aberg
0
haberg
5/14/2005 12:40:44 PM
In article 
<haberg-1405051440460001@c83-250-195-133.bredband.comhem.se>,
 haberg@math.su.se (Hans Aberg) wrote:

> In article <uce-9AA348.06591114052005@comcast.dca.giganews.com>, Gregory
> Weston <uce@splook.com> wrote:
> > > What is the functional difference between putting stuff into the follwoing
> > > two directories
> > >   /Library/Fonts/
> > >   /System/Library/Fonts/
> > 
> > The difference is that you shouldn't put anything under /System unless 
> > you know you should. And even then double-check. That's Apple's sandbox. 
> > For the specific case of fonts, /Library/Fonts is the correct place to 
> > put one that you want to be available to all users.
> 
> Thank you very much. I guess the /System/Library stuff might get erased in
> system installs, whereas the /Library stuff is up to applications and
> users what to do about it. I noticed that putting stuff in /System/Library
> requires administration password, whereas /Library doesn't.

Even /Library does if you're not an administrative user, actually. Most 
OS X users seem to just use the stock account that was created when they 
first set up their machine, but if you've created any additional users 
that aren't administrators, they'll get challenged when trying to modify 
things in /Library.

G

-- 
Goal 2005: Convincing James Hetfield to cover the Strawberry Shortcake
"Are You Berry Berry Happy?" song.
0
Gregory
5/14/2005 1:51:22 PM
In article 
<haberg-1405051440460001@c83-250-195-133.bredband.comhem.se>,
 haberg@math.su.se (Hans Aberg) wrote:

> Thank you very much. I guess the /System/Library stuff might get erased in
> system installs, whereas the /Library stuff is up to applications and
> users what to do about it.

There is no need to guess.  There are 4 domains resources can be located:

/System items are Apple's
/Network items are the LAN's (i.e., company-wide)
/ items are the machine's (I have no idea why Apple didn't use /Local)
~ items are the user's

> I noticed that putting stuff in /System/Library
> requires administration password, whereas /Library doesn't.

Wrong.  I normally use a regular account and I can't touch the / stuff.  
Look at the permissions and you'll see that it's a group thing.  /System 
stuff (generally) has a group of wheel and is unwritable, whereas / is 
admin and writable.  Only crap software makes the assumption that anyone 
can touch /.
0
Doc
5/14/2005 3:24:32 PM
> > I noticed that putting stuff in /System/Library
> > requires administration password, whereas /Library doesn't.

In article <uce-6012AD.09512214052005@comcast.dca.giganews.com>, Gregory
Weston <uce@splook.com> wrote:

> Even /Library does if you're not an administrative user, actually. Most 
> OS X users seem to just use the stock account that was created when they 
> first set up their machine, but if you've created any additional users 
> that aren't administrators, they'll get challenged when trying to modify 
> things in /Library.

In article <droleary.usenet-2CF0F0.10243214052005@corp.supernews.com>, Doc
O'Leary <droleary.usenet@2005.subsume.com> wrote:

> Wrong.  I normally use a regular account and I can't touch the / stuff.  
> Look at the permissions and you'll see that it's a group thing.  /System 
> stuff (generally) has a group of wheel and is unwritable, whereas / is 
> admin and writable.  Only crap software makes the assumption that anyone 
> can touch /.

I should be more specific: If I use the administrator account, then I need
to supply a password when changing /System, whereas when changing
/Library, I do not.

In adition, I need to work with UNIX via the Terminal. Then various stuff
require that I use the superuser account (root). I haven't though so much
exactly what requires what. The administrator account is though not a
superuser, but I do not know exactly what the differences are.

-- 
  Hans Aberg
0
haberg
5/14/2005 4:42:57 PM
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