f



10.4.7 Mac-to-Mac Networking: Comprehensive Report

Seems better, faster,  AFP connections are again more reliable to make
and sustain, and the overall improvement has given me the warm fuzzies.

Although, in the interest of full disclosure, this aspect of OS X has
been all over the lot with many of the interim updates. It's gone from
great, not as great, meh, eh, OFFS!, ahh, okay, yippee, whee!, ugh,
yeah, sweet, WT?, *stab* stab*, thank you, good, better, OMFG!, still
better, yep, that'll do it.

Apologies in advance for the extensive use of jargon and complex
performance statistics contained herein.

-- 
-John Steinberg
email: not@thistime.invalid
0
seesig (236)
7/3/2006 1:11:24 PM
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This may or may not be the right thread to post this observation, but
here goes.  Whenever I try to log into an account on our second
computer (we have a G5 iMac and G4 Powerbook), I click the Network
icon, and then the account I want to log into on that other computer.
If that computer has gone to sleep, I get a message that it is
searching for IP adress such and such.  I usually realize at this point
that the other computer is asleep, so I cancel the connect.

The "searching for IP..." dialog box goes away but I'm left with a
spinning beach ball in the Finder indefinitely.  I always have to quit
and relaunch the Finder.  Frustrating.

BTW, it happens this way on both computers, doesn't matter which one
I'm on or trying to log into.  I'm using an Airport Extreme Base
Station, and running OS 10.4.7 on both.

_d
0
ask (144)
7/5/2006 7:33:10 PM
In article <050720061233107118%ask@ifyouneedit.com>,
 Slipface <ask@ifyouneedit.com> wrote:

> This may or may not be the right thread to post this observation, but
> here goes.  Whenever I try to log into an account on our second
> computer (we have a G5 iMac and G4 Powerbook), I click the Network
> icon, and then the account I want to log into on that other computer.
> If that computer has gone to sleep, I get a message that it is
> searching for IP adress such and such.  I usually realize at this point
> that the other computer is asleep, so I cancel the connect.
> 
> The "searching for IP..." dialog box goes away but I'm left with a
> spinning beach ball in the Finder indefinitely.  I always have to quit
> and relaunch the Finder.  Frustrating.
> 
> BTW, it happens this way on both computers, doesn't matter which one
> I'm on or trying to log into.  I'm using an Airport Extreme Base
> Station, and running OS 10.4.7 on both.
> 
> _d

No expert here. 

To make things quicker to mount commonly used remote volumes, I have 
used alias of the remote Macs or partitions on them.

You might try this method. No guarantee it will solve or reduce your 
problem tho.

1) mount the remote the usual ways
2) make an alias of the remote volumes (CMD L in Finder or contextual 
menus)
3) move the alias to the sidebar in a Finder mounted window. I usually 
put it in the FAVORITES folder.
4) for subsequent use of the remote volume it seems much quicker to just 
double click the alias in the FAVORITES folder of the sidebar. The route 
of using BONJOUR to search for remote volumes seems to have longer 
delays.


But I also have had my share of perplexing local LAN Mac to Mac little 
snafus.  Most of mine are when a remote Mac has gone to sleep or both 
the local and the remote (remote icons mounted on the local one) have 
gone to sleep. I also get long SPBOD (spinning pizza ball of death) 
which eventually in my case go away. Often can't SHUT down the local one 
when the remote one has gone to sleep. Annoying delays under such 
conditions. I eventually get it SHUT DOWN but only after some 
frustration and waits.

Good luck & G'Day
Morenuf
-- 
morenuf@nobodyhome.com.invalid
0
morenuf (145)
7/6/2006 12:56:51 AM
Thanks for the reply.  A couple comments/questions below:

In article
<morenuf-C1A498.20550705072006@network-065-024-007-028.columbus.rr.com>,
 morenuf <morenuf@nobodyhome.com.invalid> wrote:


> You might try this method. No guarantee it will solve or reduce your 
> problem tho.
> 
> 1) mount the remote the usual ways
> 2) make an alias of the remote volumes (CMD L in Finder or contextual 
> menus)
> 3) move the alias to the sidebar in a Finder mounted window. I usually 
> put it in the FAVORITES folder.

I followed up to this point.  I tried to move the alias to the sidebar
without putting it into a folder (I don't have a Favorites folder
there--should I?  I might have deleted it long ago?)  Anyway, it
wouldn't take it.  That's sorta disappointing, because I need to leave
the alias on the desktop (I try to keep desktop clutter down).

Otherwise, I do really like having that alias there. It's made this
much quicker, thank you :)

> 4) for subsequent use of the remote volume it seems much quicker to just 
> double click the alias in the FAVORITES folder of the sidebar. The route 
> of using BONJOUR to search for remote volumes seems to have longer 
> delays.

I'm not familiar with Bonjour.  Is that just the software that does all
this networking muckity-muck? :)

> 
> 
> But I also have had my share of perplexing local LAN Mac to Mac little 
> snafus.  Most of mine are when a remote Mac has gone to sleep or both 
> the local and the remote (remote icons mounted on the local one) have 
> gone to sleep. I also get long SPBOD (spinning pizza ball of death) 
> which eventually in my case go away. Often can't SHUT down the local one 
> when the remote one has gone to sleep. Annoying delays under such 
> conditions. I eventually get it SHUT DOWN but only after some 
> frustration and waits.

Yeah, my pizza ball may go away eventually--I just don't have the
patience to watch it spin more than about 10 seconds, after which I
kill it the hard way.  I probably owe my system a good permissions
repair after having abused it that way a couple times now ;-)


thanks again for your helpful comments :)
_d
0
ask (144)
7/7/2006 4:06:31 AM
In article <060720062106319236%ask@ifyouneedit.com>,
 Slipface <ask@ifyouneedit.com> wrote:

> Thanks for the reply.  A couple comments/questions below:
> 
> In article
> <morenuf-C1A498.20550705072006@network-065-024-007-028.columbus.rr.com>,
>  morenuf <morenuf@nobodyhome.com.invalid> wrote:
> 
> 
> > You might try this method. No guarantee it will solve or reduce your 
> > problem tho.
> > 
> > 1) mount the remote the usual ways
> > 2) make an alias of the remote volumes (CMD L in Finder or contextual 
> > menus)
> > 3) move the alias to the sidebar in a Finder mounted window. I usually 
> > put it in the FAVORITES folder.
> 
> I followed up to this point.  I tried to move the alias to the sidebar
> without putting it into a folder (I don't have a Favorites folder
> there--should I?  I might have deleted it long ago?)  Anyway, it
> wouldn't take it.  That's sorta disappointing, because I need to leave
> the alias on the desktop (I try to keep desktop clutter down).
> 
> Otherwise, I do really like having that alias there. It's made this
> much quicker, thank you :)
> 
Not sure why you can't move the alias to your sidebar. Like  you I don't 
like a cluttered desktop.

You might have just deleted the FAVORITES folder from the sidebar from a 
standard OS X installation. The following hint is found in the HELP 
searching under Window Sidebar:
======================
Mac Help
Index

Where is my Favorites folder?
You can find your Favorites folder in the Library folder of your home 
folder. This folder is a good place to store items or aliases to items 
you use frequently.
For quick access, you can add the Favorites folder to your Dock or to 
the sidebar in a Finder window.
======================
You could also just make your own folder with any name you like 
somewhere on your hard drive and fill it with alias to anything you 
like, in this case alias to your remote LAN volumes (drives or 
partitions) on other Macs in your local area network (LAN). Then place 
THAT folder in your sidebar.
> > 4) for subsequent use of the remote volume it seems much quicker to just 
> > double click the alias in the FAVORITES folder of the sidebar. The route 
> > of using BONJOUR to search for remote volumes seems to have longer 
> > delays.
> 
> I'm not familiar with Bonjour.  Is that just the software that does all
> this networking muckity-muck? :)
> 

Yes, Bonjour was called Rendezvous in earlier versions, and was network 
software that would transparently search and display any available 
remote volumes (and printers and the like) on a local network.

What I meant was the more usual routes to find & mount remote volumes is 
to CMD K on the desktop and then BROWSE, or choosing NETWORK from the GO 
menu in the FINDER menubar  would get you a list of any available remote 
volumes on your local network.  The Bonjour/Rendezvous would display 
those volumes but often with a delay (sometimes frustratingly missing 
some that you know are there and available which eventually show up 
after interminable delays).  It just seems quicker to use an alias to 
the commonly used remote volumes.
> > 
> > 
> > But I also have had my share of perplexing local LAN Mac to Mac little 
> > snafus.  Most of mine are when a remote Mac has gone to sleep or both 

I guess some bugs remain, like SLEEP & WAKE issues.

> thanks again for your helpful comments :)
> _d

Glad to help. Others have helped me in the past.

G'Day,

Morenuf
-- 
morenuf@nobodyhome.com.invalid
0
morenuf (145)
7/7/2006 1:29:25 PM
morenuf <morenuf@nobodyhome.com.invalid> wrote:

> Not sure why you can't move the alias to your sidebar. Like  you I don't
> like a cluttered desktop.

Because it doesn't exist yet. The sidebar holds pointers to things that
exist.

-- 
Mvh./Regards,    Niels J�rgen Kruse,    Vanl�se, Denmark
0
nospam184 (146)
7/7/2006 6:18:04 PM
In article <1hi4g8r.425s2e5u5t7nN%nospam@ab-katrinedal.dk>, Niels
J�rgen Kruse <nospam@ab-katrinedal.dk> wrote:

> morenuf <morenuf@nobodyhome.com.invalid> wrote:
> 
> > Not sure why you can't move the alias to your sidebar. Like  you I don't
> > like a cluttered desktop.
> 
> Because it doesn't exist yet. The sidebar holds pointers to things that
> exist.

Interesting.  The alias *does* exist enough to survive on the desktop
and inside a folder in the sidebar.  I wonder why the sidebar excludes
it when other parts of the Finder seem to be just fine with it?

_d
0
ask (144)
7/8/2006 1:04:49 AM
Slipface <ask@ifyouneedit.com> wrote:

> In article <1hi4g8r.425s2e5u5t7nN%nospam@ab-katrinedal.dk>, Niels
> J�rgen Kruse <nospam@ab-katrinedal.dk> wrote:
> > 
> > Because it doesn't exist yet. The sidebar holds pointers to things that
> > exist.
> 
> Interesting.  The alias *does* exist enough to survive on the desktop
> and inside a folder in the sidebar.  I wonder why the sidebar excludes
> it when other parts of the Finder seem to be just fine with it?

Sorry, I didn't check first. It is actually possible to
option-command-drag items to the sidebar. The sidebar never show the
alias modification of the icon though. Dragging an alias to the sidebar
seems to be equivalent to dragging the item itself to the sidebar.

-- 
Mvh./Regards,    Niels J�rgen Kruse,    Vanl�se, Denmark
0
nospam184 (146)
7/8/2006 5:22:46 AM
In article <030720060911246007%seesig@bottom.invalid>,
 John Steinberg <seesig@bottom.invalid> wrote:

> Seems better, faster,  AFP connections are again more reliable to make
> and sustain, and the overall improvement has given me the warm fuzzies.
> 
> Although, in the interest of full disclosure, this aspect of OS X has
> been all over the lot with many of the interim updates. It's gone from
> great, not as great, meh, eh, OFFS!, ahh, okay, yippee, whee!, ugh,
> yeah, sweet, WT?, *stab* stab*, thank you, good, better, OMFG!, still
> better, yep, that'll do it.
> 
> Apologies in advance for the extensive use of jargon and complex
> performance statistics contained herein.

It wasn't until 10.3 that AFP wasn't chock full of deadlocks.  One great 
one was that canceling the first of two Finder copies left behind a file 
lock that would kill any system that stumbled across it.  Another was 
the totally unmountable AFP volume bringing the kiss of death to any 
process that dared look into the /Volumes directory.  Lets not forget 
Finder trying to parse resource forks of files as they're copied, 
resulting in a mangled .DS_Store that would corrupt any system that 
looked at it.

10.3 fixed the many deadlocks but came with the missing files bug.  Some 
files on remote volumes would appear, some wouldn't.  Sometimes the 
progress dial would never stop spinning in an empty window.

Early versions of 10.4 fixed the missing files bug but it still had the 
random-beachball-for-no-good-reason bug.  CDs did it too.

10.4.7 finally seems to be functional but crude.  There's still no 
network trash can.  Finder still uses those moronic .DS_Store files that 
aren't multi-user compatible.  One or two lost packets still cripples 
remote volumes.  Encrypted transport is still an SSH hack.

Maybe in 10.5...
0
mcmurtri (754)
7/8/2006 6:33:55 AM
Reply: