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External Hard Drive Partial Failure - Remove The Bad Internal Drive?

I own a LaCie 500GB triple interface external hard drive.  I use it to 
backup my G4 iMac every night using SuperDuper! via Firewire.

One of the two Maxtor 250GB internal drives failed.  I don't want to get 
rid of this unit, so I'm exploring options to continue using it.

If I remove the failed 250GB hard drive from the LaCie enclosure, will 
the unit work properly with only the remaining good 250GB hard drive in 
place, albeit at half of the capacity (ie. 233GB formatted)?  If so, 
will removing the failed drive, and running only the remaining good 
drive in the enclosure, affect the long term performance of this unit?

If I replace the failed 250GB hard drive, must I install:

     - an identical drive (make / model)?

     - an identical capacity drive (different make / model)?

Can I install:

     - a drive of different capacity?
          (I have two older 20GB IDE drives sitting around 
           that are candidates.  I replaced these two 
           drives with a pair of 160GB drives in the W2K 
           server at my restaurant.  They are Western Digital
           WD Cavier WD200 units about seven years old.  I 
           replaced them with larger size drives because 
           they wouldn't stay mirrored, and because they 
           were nearly full of data.)

Are there any other issues that I should consider?  I want to continue 
using this drive.  I want to spend very little money on it, but I am 
prepared to purchase an inexpensive drive to replace the failed one if 
necessary.

Thank you?

-- 


Kurt Todoroff
kurt.r.todoroff@comcast.net

     Markets, not mandates and mob rule.
     Consent, not coercion.
0
12/12/2007 1:14:21 PM
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In article 
<kurt.r.todoroff-EDE00A.08142012122007@comcast.dca.giganews.com>,
 "Kurt R. Todoroff" <kurt.r.todoroff@comcast.net> wrote:

> I own a LaCie 500GB triple interface external hard drive.  I use it to 
> backup my G4 iMac every night using SuperDuper! via Firewire.
> 
> One of the two Maxtor 250GB internal drives failed.  I don't want to get 
> rid of this unit, so I'm exploring options to continue using it.
> 
> ...
> 
> Are there any other issues that I should consider?  I want to continue 
> using this drive.  I want to spend very little money on it, but I am 
> prepared to purchase an inexpensive drive to replace the failed one if 
> necessary.

I'd say the biggest thing that you should consider is that multiple 
disks in a striped configuration is probably the least reliable medium 
you could find for a backup solution. "Spend very little money" is also 
a questionable priority for that use, IMO. Obviously you don't want to 
throw funds around gratuitously, but there's a lot of middle ground 
between being extravagant and being cheap.

How much are your time and data worth?

<http://eshop.macsales.com/shop/firewire/usb/raid_1/Gmax>

Alternatively, get multiple drives and cycle through them for each 
night, so you keep a couple of generations.
0
uce3 (3721)
12/12/2007 2:54:59 PM
In article <uce-7AC80A.09545912122007@comcast.dca.giganews.com>,
 Gregory Weston <uce@splook.com> wrote:

> In article 
> <kurt.r.todoroff-EDE00A.08142012122007@comcast.dca.giganews.com>,
>  "Kurt R. Todoroff" <kurt.r.todoroff@comcast.net> wrote:
> 
> > I own a LaCie 500GB triple interface external hard drive.  I use it to 
> > backup my G4 iMac every night using SuperDuper! via Firewire.
> > 
> > One of the two Maxtor 250GB internal drives failed.  I don't want to get 
> > rid of this unit, so I'm exploring options to continue using it.
> > 
> > ...
> > 
> > Are there any other issues that I should consider?  I want to continue 
> > using this drive.  I want to spend very little money on it, but I am 
> > prepared to purchase an inexpensive drive to replace the failed one if 
> > necessary.
> 
> I'd say the biggest thing that you should consider is that multiple 
> disks in a striped configuration is probably the least reliable medium 
> you could find for a backup solution. "Spend very little money" is also 
> a questionable priority for that use, IMO. Obviously you don't want to 
> throw funds around gratuitously, but there's a lot of middle ground 
> between being extravagant and being cheap.
> 
> How much are your time and data worth?
> 
> <http://eshop.macsales.com/shop/firewire/usb/raid_1/Gmax>
> 
> Alternatively, get multiple drives and cycle through them for each 
> night, so you keep a couple of generations.

Gregory,

Can I replace the existing 60GB factory hard drive in my G4 iMac with 
the functioning Maxtor MaXLine Plus II 250GB ATA/133 HDD from the LaCie 
enclosure?  Or is this iMac (purchased new in 2002-02) constrained by 
the 128GB (137GB) memory addressing limitation?

Thank you.

-- 


Kurt Todoroff
kurt.r.todoroff@comcast.net

     Markets, not mandates and mob rule.
     Consent, not coercion.
0
12/14/2007 4:05:06 AM
In article 
<kurt.r.todoroff-E43992.23050513122007@comcast.dca.giganews.com>,
 "Kurt R. Todoroff" <kurt.r.todoroff@comcast.net> wrote:

> Gregory,
> 
> Can I replace the existing 60GB factory hard drive in my G4 iMac with 
> the functioning Maxtor MaXLine Plus II 250GB ATA/133 HDD from the LaCie 
> enclosure?  Or is this iMac (purchased new in 2002-02) constrained by 
> the 128GB (137GB) memory addressing limitation?

Looking around, I found information that claims all iMac G4s work with 
drives larger than 128GB, but I can't find anything authoritative on it. 
If I'm reading Apple's technote correctly, they do not support it but 
they also didn't support it with another line that is known to reliably 
use them.

The bigger issue is that the hard drive in a G4 iMac is not officially a 
user-serviceable part, and the reason it's not is that taking the 
machine apart enough to change the HD is going to disrupt the cooling 
mechanism in a way that most casual upgraders will not be able to 
correctly re-establish.
0
uce3 (3721)
12/14/2007 12:28:05 PM
Kurt R. Todoroff <kurt.r.todoroff@comcast.net> wrote:

> Can I replace the existing 60GB factory hard drive in my G4 iMac with
> the functioning Maxtor MaXLine Plus II 250GB ATA/133 HDD from the LaCie
> enclosure?  Or is this iMac (purchased new in 2002-02) constrained by
> the 128GB (137GB) memory addressing limitation?

G4 iMacs don't have a drive size limitation, and your ATA/133 drive will
work with it.  Just be aware that the hard drive in a G4 iMac is a bit
of a pain to get to.

-- 
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<http://bogart-tribute.net> Tribute to Humphrey Bogart
0
mikePOST (4990)
12/14/2007 3:05:14 PM
In article <uce-545D33.07280514122007@comcast.dca.giganews.com>,
 Gregory Weston <uce@splook.com> wrote:

> In article 
> <kurt.r.todoroff-E43992.23050513122007@comcast.dca.giganews.com>,
>  "Kurt R. Todoroff" <kurt.r.todoroff@comcast.net> wrote:
> 
> > Gregory,
> > 
> > Can I replace the existing 60GB factory hard drive in my G4 iMac with 
> > the functioning Maxtor MaXLine Plus II 250GB ATA/133 HDD from the LaCie 
> > enclosure?  Or is this iMac (purchased new in 2002-02) constrained by 
> > the 128GB (137GB) memory addressing limitation?
> 
> Looking around, I found information that claims all iMac G4s work with 
> drives larger than 128GB, but I can't find anything authoritative on it. 
> If I'm reading Apple's technote correctly, they do not support it but 
> they also didn't support it with another line that is known to reliably 
> use them.
> 
> The bigger issue is that the hard drive in a G4 iMac is not officially a 
> user-serviceable part, and the reason it's not is that taking the 
> machine apart enough to change the HD is going to disrupt the cooling 
> mechanism in a way that most casual upgraders will not be able to 
> correctly re-establish.

Mike and Gregory,

I was unsure if my iMac was constrained by the IDE 28-bit limitation 
because I had stumbled across another forum posting (can't remember what 
forum) that claimed that the G4 iMacs did not support hard drives larger 
than 128GB until after 2003.  However, the poster did not provide a 
source for his claim.

Gregory, are you saying that the hard drive replacement process is not a 
non-destructive one?  In accessing the hard drive, are certain 
components damaged or destroyed (eg. paper baffles or louvers)?

-- 


Kurt Todoroff
kurt.r.todoroff@comcast.net

     Markets, not mandates and mob rule.
     Consent, not coercion.
0
12/14/2007 4:35:16 PM
In article
<kurt.r.todoroff-DC9B42.11351614122007@comcast.dca.giganews.com>, Kurt
R. Todoroff <kurt.r.todoroff@comcast.net> wrote:

> Gregory, are you saying that the hard drive replacement process is not a 
> non-destructive one?  In accessing the hard drive, are certain 
> components damaged or destroyed (eg. paper baffles or louvers)?

if you don't correctly reapply the thermal paste (which if i'm not
mistaken, the old stuff must be completely removed), then the cpu can
overheat and you can then begin looking for a replacement mac.
0
nospam59 (11089)
12/14/2007 6:08:11 PM
In article <141220071008115834%nospam@nospam.invalid>,
 nospam <nospam@nospam.invalid> wrote:

> In article
> <kurt.r.todoroff-DC9B42.11351614122007@comcast.dca.giganews.com>, Kurt
> R. Todoroff <kurt.r.todoroff@comcast.net> wrote:
> 
> > Gregory, are you saying that the hard drive replacement process is not a 
> > non-destructive one?  In accessing the hard drive, are certain 
> > components damaged or destroyed (eg. paper baffles or louvers)?
> 
> if you don't correctly reapply the thermal paste (which if i'm not
> mistaken, the old stuff must be completely removed), then the cpu can
> overheat and you can then begin looking for a replacement mac.

You know, I remember reading this several years ago shortly after I 
purchased my G4 iMac.  Thank you for refreshing my memory.

I'll find another use for the good 250GB drive.  I can't make it work in 
the enclosure even when I disconnect the power and data from the inop 
drive.  Disk Utility won't format it, even though it recognizes it.

-- 


Kurt Todoroff
kurt.r.todoroff@comcast.net

     Markets, not mandates and mob rule.
     Consent, not coercion.
0
12/14/2007 7:24:34 PM
Gregory Weston <uce@splook.com> wrote:

> In article 
> <kurt.r.todoroff-E43992.23050513122007@comcast.dca.giganews.com>,
>  "Kurt R. Todoroff" <kurt.r.todoroff@comcast.net> wrote:
> 
> > Gregory,
> > 
> > Can I replace the existing 60GB factory hard drive in my G4 iMac with
> > the functioning Maxtor MaXLine Plus II 250GB ATA/133 HDD from the LaCie
> > enclosure?  Or is this iMac (purchased new in 2002-02) constrained by
> > the 128GB (137GB) memory addressing limitation?
> 
> Looking around, I found information that claims all iMac G4s work with
> drives larger than 128GB, but I can't find anything authoritative on it.

MacTracker indicates that they are officially supported for all models
apart from the first 15" one (January 2002 to February 2003, 700 or 800
MHz), and they have anecdotal reports from some owners of those models
that they do work.

Apple's official policy is that it is supported on all new desktop
models introduced in July 2002 or later, which includes the first 17"
iMac G4 but excludes the first 15" model. (I don't have a link handy -
it is in a knowledge base article.)

Some early 2002 models in other product lines also unofficially support
drives larger than 128 GB: my PowerMac G4 (QuickSilver 2002) was
produced in January 2002 and it works fine with a 320 GB internal drive.
This doesn't guarantee support in a 2002 15" iMac G4 (or even in other
QuickSilvers), of course.

There is no official policy from Apple as to laptop support for internal
drives larger than 128 GB, but they are clearly OK for the MacBook and
MacBook Pro, and most Aluminium PowerBook G4s and iBook G4s should be
OK. Unlikely for the Titanium PowerBook G4 and iBook G3.

> The bigger issue is that the hard drive in a G4 iMac is not officially a
> user-serviceable part, and the reason it's not is that taking the 
> machine apart enough to change the HD is going to disrupt the cooling
> mechanism in a way that most casual upgraders will not be able to 
> correctly re-establish.

Indeed. That thermal paste (and tight construction) worries me. I've
done a few iMac G3 hard drive upgrades (both tray-loading and
slot-loading), and a Titanium PowerBook G4. I'm about to attempt an
Aluminium PowerBook G4 (15"), which I gather is similar in complexity to
an iBook.

-- 
David Empson
dempson@actrix.gen.nz
0
dempson (3825)
12/16/2007 11:05:20 PM
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