f



Is there a way to manually clear swap space?

Besides restarting the computer?

Like from Terminal or something? I do a lot of simultaneous work, and
that slows down my computer when it writes to the swap space, so I was
wondering if besides using kill to kill running processes I can
manually clear the swap space without restarting the computer.
0
oraclmaster (253)
12/18/2010 12:26:17 PM
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In article
<1c6a94b3-373c-4b81-a7ed-3103e1cefa44@m37g2000vbn.googlegroups.com>, Le
Chiffre <oraclmaster@gmail.com> wrote:

> Besides restarting the computer?
> 
> Like from Terminal or something? I do a lot of simultaneous work, and
> that slows down my computer when it writes to the swap space, so I was
> wondering if besides using kill to kill running processes I can
> manually clear the swap space without restarting the computer.

quit as many apps as you can, and after a short time some of the swap
files will go away. if that doesn't work, log out and back in. 

or buy more memory.
0
nospam
12/18/2010 2:31:27 PM
In article 
<1c6a94b3-373c-4b81-a7ed-3103e1cefa44@m37g2000vbn.googlegroups.com>,
 Le Chiffre <oraclmaster@gmail.com> wrote:

> Besides restarting the computer?
> 
> Like from Terminal or something? I do a lot of simultaneous work, and
> that slows down my computer when it writes to the swap space, so I was
> wondering if besides using kill to kill running processes I can
> manually clear the swap space without restarting the computer.

Why do you think *clearing* swap space would speed things up.  If your 
simultaneous operations are swapping too much, you're short on RAM, not 
"clear" swap space.

-- 
Tom Stiller

PGP fingerprint =  5108 DDB2 9761 EDE5 E7E3  7BDA 71ED 6496 99C0 C7CF
0
Tom
12/18/2010 2:42:19 PM
On Dec 18, 9:42=A0am, Tom Stiller <tom_stil...@yahoo.com> wrote:
> In article
> <1c6a94b3-373c-4b81-a7ed-3103e1cef...@m37g2000vbn.googlegroups.com>,
> =A0Le Chiffre <oraclmas...@gmail.com> wrote:
>
> > Besides restarting the computer?
>
> > Like from Terminal or something? I do a lot of simultaneous work, and
> > that slows down my computer when it writes to the swap space, so I was
> > wondering if besides using kill to kill running processes I can
> > manually clear the swap space without restarting the computer.
>
> Why do you think *clearing* swap space would speed things up. =A0If your
> simultaneous operations are swapping too much, you're short on RAM, not
> "clear" swap space.
>
> --
> Tom Stiller
>
> PGP fingerprint =3D =A05108 DDB2 9761 EDE5 E7E3 =A07BDA 71ED 6496 99C0 C7=
CF

I don't think it will speed things up, I just want to be able to clean
things up after I'm done with my simultaneous processes. I've got 4 GB
of RAM which is fine for most of my purposes except for the occasional
hiccup in activity. I don't even touch swap most of the time, but when
I do I like to clean up after myself.
0
Le
12/18/2010 4:05:44 PM
In article 
<1c6a94b3-373c-4b81-a7ed-3103e1cefa44@m37g2000vbn.googlegroups.com>,
 Le Chiffre <oraclmaster@gmail.com> wrote:

> Besides restarting the computer?
> 
> Like from Terminal or something? I do a lot of simultaneous work, and
> that slows down my computer when it writes to the swap space, so I was
> wondering if besides using kill to kill running processes I can
> manually clear the swap space without restarting the computer.

It's just taking up space on disk.  If it's not being used, it doesn't 
affect performance.  So unless you're running out of disk space, there's 
no point in trying to clear it up.

I don't think there's any way to clear it up on the fly.

-- 
Barry Margolin, barmar@alum.mit.edu
Arlington, MA
*** PLEASE post questions in newsgroups, not directly to me ***
*** PLEASE don't copy me on replies, I'll read them in the group ***
0
Barry
12/18/2010 4:22:12 PM
In article <barmar-8FFCBE.11221218122010@news.eternal-september.org>,
 Barry Margolin <barmar@alum.mit.edu> wrote:

> In article 
> <1c6a94b3-373c-4b81-a7ed-3103e1cefa44@m37g2000vbn.googlegroups.com>,
>  Le Chiffre <oraclmaster@gmail.com> wrote:
> 
> > Besides restarting the computer?
> > 
> > Like from Terminal or something? I do a lot of simultaneous work, and
> > that slows down my computer when it writes to the swap space, so I was
> > wondering if besides using kill to kill running processes I can
> > manually clear the swap space without restarting the computer.
> 
> It's just taking up space on disk.  If it's not being used, it doesn't 
> affect performance.  So unless you're running out of disk space, there's 
> no point in trying to clear it up.
> 
> I don't think there's any way to clear it up on the fly.

And as someone else suggested, clearing it likely won't fix the actual 
problem, which is that the OP needs more physical RAM installed.

-- 
Send responses to the relevant news group rather than email to me.
E-mail sent to this address may be devoured by my very hungry SPAM
filter. Due to Google's refusal to prevent spammers from posting
messages through their servers, I often ignore posts from Google
Groups. Use a real news client if you want me to see your posts.

JR
0
Jolly
12/18/2010 5:00:18 PM
On 12-18-2010 12:00, Jolly Roger wrote:
> And as someone else suggested, clearing it likely won't fix the actual
> problem, which is that the OP needs more physical RAM installed.

Then again, he claimed to already have four GB, and that the
"actual problem" is a perceived need to clean up after himself.

For which my answer is, “When you don't trust your O.S. to
do what you want, you must buy or build a different one.”  :-)

-- 
Wes Groleau

   New numbers for next year
   http://Ideas.Lang-Learn.us/barrett?itemid=1495
0
Wes
12/18/2010 5:11:13 PM
In article <ieipvj$4ou$1@news.eternal-september.org>,
 Wes Groleau <Groleau+news@FreeShell.org> wrote:

> On 12-18-2010 12:00, Jolly Roger wrote:
> > And as someone else suggested, clearing it likely won't fix the actual
> > problem, which is that the OP needs more physical RAM installed.
> 
> Then again, he claimed to already have four GB, and that the
> "actual problem" is a perceived need to clean up after himself.
> 
> For which my answer is, �When you don't trust your O.S. to
> do what you want, you must buy or build a different one.�  :-)

Oh did he? I didn't catch that. Good point.  : )

-- 
Send responses to the relevant news group rather than email to me.
E-mail sent to this address may be devoured by my very hungry SPAM
filter. Due to Google's refusal to prevent spammers from posting
messages through their servers, I often ignore posts from Google
Groups. Use a real news client if you want me to see your posts.

JR
0
Jolly
12/18/2010 5:14:51 PM
In article <ieipvj$4ou$1@news.eternal-september.org>,
 Wes Groleau <Groleau+news@FreeShell.org> wrote:

> On 12-18-2010 12:00, Jolly Roger wrote:
> > And as someone else suggested, clearing it likely won't fix the actual
> > problem, which is that the OP needs more physical RAM installed.
> 
> Then again, he claimed to already have four GB, and that the
> "actual problem" is a perceived need to clean up after himself.

Where did the OP say that he had 4 GB?

> 
> For which my answer is, “When you don't trust your O.S. to
> do what you want, you must buy or build a different one.”  :-)

-- 
Tom Stiller

PGP fingerprint =  5108 DDB2 9761 EDE5 E7E3  7BDA 71ED 6496 99C0 C7CF
0
Tom
12/18/2010 8:06:46 PM
Tom Stiller <tom_stiller@yahoo.com> wrote:

> > Then again, he claimed to already have four GB, and that the
> > "actual problem" is a perceived need to clean up after himself.
> 
> Where did the OP say that he had 4 GB?

<0ca73f5b-d5da-4c00-948e-74a57f611fb5@z19g2000yqb.googlegroups.com>

-- 
My latest dance routines:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kkxGQmTvctc
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MTajUBrlA6c
0
mikePOST
12/18/2010 8:43:32 PM
In article <1jtpcz6.1c138po1dyjijwN%mikePOST@TOGROUPmacconsult.com>,
 mikePOST@TOGROUPmacconsult.com (Mike Rosenberg) wrote:

> Tom Stiller <tom_stiller@yahoo.com> wrote:
> 
> > > Then again, he claimed to already have four GB, and that the
> > > "actual problem" is a perceived need to clean up after himself.
> > 
> > Where did the OP say that he had 4 GB?
> 
> <0ca73f5b-d5da-4c00-948e-74a57f611fb5@z19g2000yqb.googlegroups.com>

Damn! I've *got* to pay better attention.

-- 
Tom Stiller

PGP fingerprint =  5108 DDB2 9761 EDE5 E7E3  7BDA 71ED 6496 99C0 C7CF
0
Tom
12/18/2010 8:49:14 PM
In article 
<1c6a94b3-373c-4b81-a7ed-3103e1cefa44@m37g2000vbn.googlegroups.com>,
 Le Chiffre <oraclmaster@gmail.com> wrote:

> Besides restarting the computer?
> 
> Like from Terminal or something? I do a lot of simultaneous work, and
> that slows down my computer when it writes to the swap space, so I was
> wondering if besides using kill to kill running processes I can
> manually clear the swap space without restarting the computer.

Close all applications. In Finder select GO -> Go to Folder...

Type in /private/var/vm/ to see your swap files. You'll need to enter an 
Admin name and password to delete them. The system will then 
automatically re-create them as needed. But, as others have said, this 
won't really do anything for you in terms of performance. Physical 
memory is the only way to deal with this issue. The more physical memory 
you have the less need for the swap files to be used.

-- 
"Momma always said, "Stupid is as stupid does.""  -Forest Gump

"You can't fix stupid."  -Jim White, local radio personality
0
Elijah
12/18/2010 9:04:00 PM
In article <1c6a94b3-373c-4b81-a7ed-3103e1cefa44@m37g2000vbn.googlegroups.com>,
 Le Chiffre <oraclmaster@gmail.com> wrote:

> Besides restarting the computer?
> 
> Like from Terminal or something? I do a lot of simultaneous work, and
> that slows down my computer when it writes to the swap space, so I was
> wondering if besides using kill to kill running processes I can
> manually clear the swap space without restarting the computer.

If you're thrashing VM, you're pretty much stuck. You have to get more real 
memory, run less demanding processes, or delve into the black magic of VM and 
pagers.

-- 
Damn the living - It's a lovely life.           I'm whoever you want me to be.
Silver silverware - Where is the love?       At least I can stay in character.
Oval swimming pool - Where is the love?    Annoying Usenet one post at a time.
Damn the living - It's a lovely life.           'I was born Earth's daughter.'
0
Ered
12/18/2010 9:07:35 PM
Le Chiffre wrote:

> Like from Terminal or something? I do a lot of simultaneous work, and
> that slows down my computer when it writes to the swap space, so I was
> wondering if besides using kill to kill running processes I can
> manually clear the swap space without restarting the computer.

I am not familiar with how OS-X manages the page file(s).

However, as a concept, a process is allocated a certain amount of space
on disk for memory that is not in ram. (in VMS terms the process memory
that is in ram is called the working set).

Ending/killing the process will free the space on disk. In a single page
file, those blocks become available to another process. If you have one
page file per process, then I guess the page file is deleted along with
the process.

Note that a runaway process (like Firefox having gone into some porn
site javascript loop that opens windows etc) will end up consuming huge
amounts of page file. And when you kill it, deallocating the memory
requires that it be read in RAM in chunks that fit the available
physical memory and this can take a lot of time.
0
JF
12/18/2010 9:13:54 PM
Tom Stiller <tom_stiller@yahoo.com> wrote:

> In article <ieipvj$4ou$1@news.eternal-september.org>,
>  Wes Groleau <Groleau+news@FreeShell.org> wrote:
> 
> > On 12-18-2010 12:00, Jolly Roger wrote:
> > > And as someone else suggested, clearing it likely won't fix the actual
> > > problem, which is that the OP needs more physical RAM installed.
> > 
> > Then again, he claimed to already have four GB, and that the
> > "actual problem" is a perceived need to clean up after himself.
> 
> Where did the OP say that he had 4 GB?

In a followup post to your first comment on this thread.

In article
<0ca73f5b-d5da-4c00-948e-74a57f611fb5@z19g2000yqb.googlegroups.com>,
Le Chiffre <oraclmaster@gmail.com> wrote:
>
> I don't think it will speed things up, I just want to be able to clean
> things up after I'm done with my simultaneous processes. I've got 4 GB
> of RAM which is fine for most of my purposes except for the occasional
> hiccup in activity. I don't even touch swap most of the time, but when
> I do I like to clean up after myself.

-- 
David Empson
dempson@actrix.gen.nz
0
dempson
12/18/2010 9:18:31 PM
Question:

On OS-X, does each process have its own swap/page file, or is there one
 that is large enough to contain all the paged out memory pages ?


If you have performance problems, go into activity monitor and look at
the amout of virtual memory consumed by processes. You may spot one with
inordinate amounts and you can then quit that one and it will free up a
lot of disk space and virtual memory.


BTW, is there a way to limit the amount of virtual memory a process is
allowed to consume ? (on VMS, there is the PGFILQUOTA that ias defined
on a per-user basis).
0
JF
12/18/2010 9:20:42 PM
Elijah Baley wrote:

> Type in /private/var/vm/ to see your swap files.

OK answers a previous question. I have 5 files.  Is there some logic
behind how many files are created ? (number of processes per file ?).

If you have multiple processes that map their memory to a physical file,
then you *should* not be allowed to delete such a file until all
processes that have memory mapped (or reserved) in that file have quitted.

It is also possible that if the "rm" command succeeds, that the real
file doesn't actually get deleted because the system must ensure that
blocks that contain an active processe's memory remain valid, and more
importantly, that such blocks are not given other purposes (for
instance, you create a file containing very poersonal information, and
the process that had its memory mapped to those disk blocks then read
its memory and now gets your data instead of its data.

Windows might allow this because of its roots as a single user system,
but I suspect any unix variant would have proper page file protection
mechanisms.

Note that when you quit a process, its reservation of blocks within a
page file may be wirtdrawn, but it does not mean that the whole
swap/page file will be reduced in size.

Consider a 3 processes that share a page file. Second process quits, it
it releases a large number of blocks in the middle of the page file. The
other 2 processes have blocks allocated towards the start and towards
the end of the file, so the system couldn't shrink it unless it did some
serious remaopping of virtual memory of the affected processes. This
would have some performance impact and likely require those processes be
frozen during the process.
0
JF
12/18/2010 9:33:46 PM
In article <4d0d28bd$0$2205$c3e8da3$40d4fd75@news.astraweb.com>,
 JF Mezei <jfmezei.spamnot@vaxination.ca> wrote:

> Elijah Baley wrote:
> 
> > Type in /private/var/vm/ to see your swap files.
> 
> OK answers a previous question. I have 5 files.  Is there some logic
> behind how many files are created ? (number of processes per file ?).

Once created, swap file sizes don't change. When all the swap files are full and 
there is disk space left, it creates another one. It looks like it doubles file 
sizes each time.

> Note that when you quit a process, its reservation of blocks within a
> page file may be wirtdrawn, but it does not mean that the whole
> swap/page file will be reduced in size.

The swap files are collectively like a little disc partition with a process's 
virtual memory like an inode. Logically consecutive pages are mapped into random 
sectors in the swap as needed. There's no more reason pages should be 
consecutive sectors on disc than consecutive real pages in memory.

> serious remaopping of virtual memory of the affected processes. This
> would have some performance impact and likely require those processes be
> frozen during the process.

If those sectors were needed in the past, it's a fair guess they will be needed 
in the future, so they might as well be kept allocated. An idle sector costs 
only disc space; unless you're running out of disc, the swap size is unimportant.

-- 
Damn the living - It's a lovely life.           I'm whoever you want me to be.
Silver silverware - Where is the love?       At least I can stay in character.
Oval swimming pool - Where is the love?    Annoying Usenet one post at a time.
Damn the living - It's a lovely life.           'I was born Earth's daughter.'
0
Ered
12/18/2010 10:17:30 PM
In article <tom_stiller-548745.15491418122010@news.individual.net>,
 Tom Stiller <tom_stiller@yahoo.com> wrote:

> In article <1jtpcz6.1c138po1dyjijwN%mikePOST@TOGROUPmacconsult.com>,
>  mikePOST@TOGROUPmacconsult.com (Mike Rosenberg) wrote:
> 
> > Tom Stiller <tom_stiller@yahoo.com> wrote:
> > 
> > > > Then again, he claimed to already have four GB, and that the
> > > > "actual problem" is a perceived need to clean up after himself.
> > > 
> > > Where did the OP say that he had 4 GB?
> > 
> > <0ca73f5b-d5da-4c00-948e-74a57f611fb5@z19g2000yqb.googlegroups.com>
> 
> Damn! I've *got* to pay better attention.

Meh... happens to us all.  : )

-- 
Send responses to the relevant news group rather than email to me.
E-mail sent to this address may be devoured by my very hungry SPAM
filter. Due to Google's refusal to prevent spammers from posting
messages through their servers, I often ignore posts from Google
Groups. Use a real news client if you want me to see your posts.

JR
0
Jolly
12/18/2010 11:17:31 PM
In article 
1c6a94b3-373c-4b81-a7ed-3103e1cefa44@m37g2000vbn.googlegroups.com, Le
Chiffre at oraclmaster@gmail.com wrote on 12/18/10 7:26 AM:

> Besides restarting the computer?
> 
> Like from Terminal or something? I do a lot of simultaneous work, and
> that slows down my computer when it writes to the swap space, so I was
> wondering if besides using kill to kill running processes I can
> manually clear the swap space without restarting the computer.


http://jimmitchell.org/yasu/



-- 
iMac (27", 3.2 GHz Intel Core i3, 4 GB RAM, 1 TB HDD) � OS X (10.6.5)

0
Nick
12/19/2010 12:36:54 AM
In article <lije-C57E94.15040018122010@news.giganews.com>,
 Elijah Baley <lije@foundation.org> wrote:

> In article 
> <1c6a94b3-373c-4b81-a7ed-3103e1cefa44@m37g2000vbn.googlegroups.com>,
>  Le Chiffre <oraclmaster@gmail.com> wrote:
> 
> > Besides restarting the computer?
> > 
> > Like from Terminal or something? I do a lot of simultaneous work, and
> > that slows down my computer when it writes to the swap space, so I was
> > wondering if besides using kill to kill running processes I can
> > manually clear the swap space without restarting the computer.
> 
> Close all applications. In Finder select GO -> Go to Folder...
> 
> Type in /private/var/vm/ to see your swap files. You'll need to enter an 
> Admin name and password to delete them. The system will then 
> automatically re-create them as needed. But, as others have said, this 
> won't really do anything for you in terms of performance. Physical 
> memory is the only way to deal with this issue. The more physical memory 
> you have the less need for the swap files to be used.

This will do 2 things.  First the operating system should have an 
open reference on all the swap files, so if you delete it, the 
file will not go away, it will just not have a directory entry 
pointing a it.  Or lets hope the OS keeps an open reference to the 
file, or if the OS is still using it, and the file system releases 
the storage, then there would be a conflict between new files 
being given the storage while the OS is still using that storage 
as swap space (had this happen in an OS back in the early '80; it 
was not pretty).

The 2nd thing it will do is maybe create a lost file.  If the 
operating system does a normal shutdown, which is when the OS 
should close its reference to the swap files, then the file system 
should actually delete the file, however, if the system should 
crash (or loose power), then there will not be a clean shutdown, 
and the OS will not close its handle on the swapfiles, and that 
storage will be lost until Disk Utility Repair is run.

Your mileage may vary, as I'm basing my opinion on how this works 
in other Unix based operating systems I've worked on.  And when I 
say worked on, I mean my day job is as a Unix file system 
developer.
0
Bob
12/19/2010 12:56:03 AM
In article C932BDD6.679FB%nicknaym@_remove_this_gmail.com.invalid, Nick Naym
at nicknaym@_remove_this_gmail.com.invalid wrote on 12/18/10 7:36 PM:

> In article 
> 1c6a94b3-373c-4b81-a7ed-3103e1cefa44@m37g2000vbn.googlegroups.com, Le
> Chiffre at oraclmaster@gmail.com wrote on 12/18/10 7:26 AM:
> 
>> Besides restarting the computer?
>> 
>> Like from Terminal or something? I do a lot of simultaneous work, and
>> that slows down my computer when it writes to the swap space, so I was
>> wondering if besides using kill to kill running processes I can
>> manually clear the swap space without restarting the computer.
> 
> 
> http://jimmitchell.org/yasu/
> 
> 



Never mind...after clearing swap files, YASU requires either a restart or
shutdown. (Some other maintenance tasks YASU performs do not.)



-- 
iMac (27", 3.2 GHz Intel Core i3, 4 GB RAM, 1 TB HDD) � OS X (10.6.5)

0
Nick
12/19/2010 1:06:10 AM
In article <4d0d28bd$0$2205$c3e8da3$40d4fd75@news.astraweb.com>,
 JF Mezei <jfmezei.spamnot@vaxination.ca> wrote:

> Elijah Baley wrote:
> 
> > Type in /private/var/vm/ to see your swap files.
> 
> OK answers a previous question. I have 5 files.  Is there some logic
> behind how many files are created ? (number of processes per file ?).

No.  pagefiles (the same as VMS) are just a pool of store for 
virtual memory to be paged into/out of.  Mac OS X starts at a 
small 64MB, the 2nd pagefile is also 64MB, then it starts 
doubling.  I think when it reaches a specific higher size, it 
stops doubling the size of the pagefile.

There is not ratio of processes to page files.

The logic is that if more virtual memory needs to be forced to 
disk, and the existing pagefiles do not have enough free space, 
then additional pagefiles are created.

> If you have multiple processes that map their memory to a physical file,
> then you *should* not be allowed to delete such a file until all
> processes that have memory mapped (or reserved) in that file have quitted.

It is a pool of storage.  Besides, deleting the file does not 
close the open file descriptor, so all you have done is made the 
file unaccessible from another program, including the command 
line.  The file inode and all its storage should still exist in 
the file system until the operating system closes its file 
descriptor reference to the swapfile at normal shutdown.

> It is also possible that if the "rm" command succeeds, that the real
> file doesn't actually get deleted because the system must ensure that
> blocks that contain an active processe's memory remain valid, and more
> importantly, that such blocks are not given other purposes (for
> instance, you create a file containing very poersonal information, and
> the process that had its memory mapped to those disk blocks then read
> its memory and now gets your data instead of its data.

Yup.  Although way back in VMS 2.0 you could do this, and thus 
trash your file system.  VMS learned.

> Windows might allow this because of its roots as a single user system,
> but I suspect any unix variant would have proper page file protection
> mechanisms.

Unix, from the earliest days, has always separated deleting the 
directory file name entry, from releasing the inode and storage as 
long as there was an open references on the file.  And the Unix 
file systems I've worked on (as in development) have been very 
careful about not releasing storage for a file that has an open 
reference (Tru64 UNIX, HP-UX, Linux, Solaris, AIX).

> Note that when you quit a process, its reservation of blocks within a
> page file may be wirtdrawn, but it does not mean that the whole
> swap/page file will be reduced in size.

Just like non-paged-pool does not get smaller after it has grown 
in size.  Although the Non-Paged Pool behind ZKO did grow and 
shrink depending on the weather :-)

> Consider a 3 processes that share a page file. Second process quits, it
> it releases a large number of blocks in the middle of the page file. The
> other 2 processes have blocks allocated towards the start and towards
> the end of the file, so the system couldn't shrink it unless it did some
> serious remaopping of virtual memory of the affected processes. This
> would have some performance impact and likely require those processes be
> frozen during the process.

Yup.  But those freed swap pages are then available for the next 
swap operation by any other process still running.

Plus most operating systems figure that if you needed once, you 
will need it again, so they tend to keep pagefiles around once 
they have created them.
0
Bob
12/19/2010 1:15:13 AM
Ered China Luin wrote:

> If those sectors were needed in the past, it's a fair guess they will be needed 
> in the future, so they might as well be kept allocated. An idle sector costs 
> only disc space; unless you're running out of disc, the swap size is unimportant.


Actually, from a performance point of view, it is important. If you have
a very large file, the OS (generically speaking, not sure about OS-X)
can allocate contiguous blocks to processes, so when a process needs
access to memory, it can do multiblock read operation, and this greatly
reduces head seek times etc.

If your data is scattered all over the file, then reading your data
requires more disk head movements and more latency compared to doing a
single multi block read of consecutive blocks.

(think about fragmentation within a file).
0
JF
12/19/2010 4:33:57 AM
In article <4d0d8b36$0$2367$c3e8da3$9deca2c3@news.astraweb.com>,
 JF Mezei <jfmezei.spamnot@vaxination.ca> wrote:

> Ered China Luin wrote:
> 
> > If those sectors were needed in the past, it's a fair guess they will be 
> > needed 
> > in the future, so they might as well be kept allocated. An idle sector 
> > costs 
> > only disc space; unless you're running out of disc, the swap size is 
> > unimportant.
> 
> 
> Actually, from a performance point of view, it is important. If you have
> a very large file, the OS (generically speaking, not sure about OS-X)
> can allocate contiguous blocks to processes, so when a process needs
> access to memory, it can do multiblock read operation, and this greatly
> reduces head seek times etc.
> 
> If your data is scattered all over the file, then reading your data
> requires more disk head movements and more latency compared to doing a
> single multi block read of consecutive blocks.
> 
> (think about fragmentation within a file).

You can't avoid fragmentation without allocating all the space at once. Disc 
allocators attempt to group logical sectors into the same physical tracks, but 
you don't want to use a system that pukes when it can't. I used VSOS and its 
disc allocation was very painful.

-- 
Damn the living - It's a lovely life.           I'm whoever you want me to be.
Silver silverware - Where is the love?       At least I can stay in character.
Oval swimming pool - Where is the love?    Annoying Usenet one post at a time.
Damn the living - It's a lovely life.           'I was born Earth's daughter.'
0
Ered
12/19/2010 5:12:47 AM
In article <4d0d25aa$0$24024$c3e8da3$9b4ff22a@news.astraweb.com>,
 JF Mezei <jfmezei.spamnot@vaxination.ca> wrote:

> Question:
> 
> On OS-X, does each process have its own swap/page file, or is there one
>  that is large enough to contain all the paged out memory pages ?

They all share the same swap files.

> If you have performance problems, go into activity monitor and look at
> the amout of virtual memory consumed by processes. You may spot one with
> inordinate amounts and you can then quit that one and it will free up a
> lot of disk space and virtual memory.
> 
> 
> BTW, is there a way to limit the amount of virtual memory a process is
> allowed to consume ? (on VMS, there is the PGFILQUOTA that ias defined
> on a per-user basis).

Unix has the ulimit command, but I think I've read that OS X doesn't 
implement the limit on VM size.

-- 
Barry Margolin, barmar@alum.mit.edu
Arlington, MA
*** PLEASE post questions in newsgroups, not directly to me ***
*** PLEASE don't copy me on replies, I'll read them in the group ***
0
Barry
12/19/2010 5:27:20 AM
In article <4d0d8b36$0$2367$c3e8da3$9deca2c3@news.astraweb.com>,
 JF Mezei <jfmezei.spamnot@vaxination.ca> wrote:

> Ered China Luin wrote:
> 
> > If those sectors were needed in the past, it's a fair guess they will be 
> > needed 
> > in the future, so they might as well be kept allocated. An idle sector 
> > costs 
> > only disc space; unless you're running out of disc, the swap size is 
> > unimportant.
> 
> 
> Actually, from a performance point of view, it is important. If you have
> a very large file, the OS (generically speaking, not sure about OS-X)
> can allocate contiguous blocks to processes, so when a process needs
> access to memory, it can do multiblock read operation, and this greatly
> reduces head seek times etc.
> 
> If your data is scattered all over the file, then reading your data
> requires more disk head movements and more latency compared to doing a
> single multi block read of consecutive blocks.
> 
> (think about fragmentation within a file).

Except for virtual memory mapping of a file, it's unlikely that there 
would be a demand for multi-block reads of consecutive blocks.  If the 
file consists of consecutive blocks then there's no problem.  Normal 
process scheduling and paging produce more scattered demands from the 
backing store.

-- 
Tom Stiller

PGP fingerprint =  5108 DDB2 9761 EDE5 E7E3  7BDA 71ED 6496 99C0 C7CF
0
Tom
12/19/2010 12:52:02 PM
On 12-18-2010 20:06, Nick Naym wrote:
> Never mind...after clearing swap files, YASU requires either a restart or
> shutdown. (Some other maintenance tasks YASU performs do not.)

:-) After clearing swap files, it demands an operation
     that clears swap files.  Cute.

-- 
Wes Groleau

   Cage Fights at South Oak Cliff High
   http://Ideas.Lang-Learn.us/russell?itemid=1458
0
Wes
12/20/2010 12:24:05 AM
> quit as many apps as you can, and after a short time some of the swap
> files will go away. if that doesn't work, log out and back in.
>
> or buy more memory.

Apple's memory sticks aren't cheap! Have you some suggestions for a 
cheaper RAM (still stable)? I'm also needing more RAM.
0
Anic297
12/20/2010 8:17:44 PM
In article <4d0fb9e9$0$4019$5402220f@news.sunrise.ch>, Anic297
<here@nowhere.com> wrote:

> > quit as many apps as you can, and after a short time some of the swap
> > files will go away. if that doesn't work, log out and back in.
> >
> > or buy more memory.
> 
> Apple's memory sticks aren't cheap! Have you some suggestions for a 
> cheaper RAM (still stable)? I'm also needing more RAM.

anywhere that sells memory that meets the specs for the particular mac
(it depends which model). you also should look for a good warranty.

other world computing, crucial, newegg, among many other places, all
sell it.
0
nospam
12/20/2010 8:36:58 PM
In article <4d0fb9e9$0$4019$5402220f@news.sunrise.ch>,
 Anic297 <here@nowhere.com> wrote:

> > quit as many apps as you can, and after a short time some of the swap
> > files will go away. if that doesn't work, log out and back in.
> >
> > or buy more memory.
> 
> Apple's memory sticks aren't cheap! Have you some suggestions for a 
> cheaper RAM (still stable)? I'm also needing more RAM.

This question is asked here a *lot*; it sure would be nice if people 
would search before asking! 

Start at http://ramseeker.com. 

Crucial tends to be in the cheap range, and of good quality.

-- 
Send responses to the relevant news group rather than email to me.
E-mail sent to this address may be devoured by my very hungry SPAM
filter. Due to Google's refusal to prevent spammers from posting
messages through their servers, I often ignore posts from Google
Groups. Use a real news client if you want me to see your posts.

JR
0
Jolly
12/21/2010 1:54:39 AM
>>> quit as many apps as you can, and after a short time some of the swap
>>> files will go away. if that doesn't work, log out and back in.
>>>
>>> or buy more memory.
>>
>> Apple's memory sticks aren't cheap! Have you some suggestions for a
>> cheaper RAM (still stable)? I'm also needing more RAM.
>
> This question is asked here a *lot*; it sure would be nice if people
> would search before asking!

I can't search: articles expire as soon as they are 2 weeks old.
0
Anic297
12/22/2010 12:20:51 PM
>> Apple's memory sticks aren't cheap! Have you some suggestions for a
>> cheaper RAM (still stable)? I'm also needing more RAM.
>
> anywhere that sells memory that meets the specs for the particular mac
> (it depends which model). you also should look for a good warranty.
>
> other world computing, crucial, newegg, among many other places, all
> sell it.

Thank you
0
Anic297
12/22/2010 12:21:12 PM
In article <4d11ed23$0$4016$5402220f@news.sunrise.ch>, Anic297
<here@nowhere.com> wrote:

> I can't search: articles expire as soon as they are 2 weeks old.

they can be found via google.
0
nospam
12/22/2010 12:43:14 PM
On 10-12-22 7:20 , Anic297 wrote:


> I can't search: articles expire as soon as they are 2 weeks old.

http://groups.google.com/group/comp.sys.mac.system/topics?lnk

-- 
gmail originated posts filtered due to spam.
0
Alan
12/22/2010 2:07:51 PM
nospam wrote:
>> I can't search: articles expire as soon as they are 2 weeks old.
>
> they can be found via google.

Alan Browne wrote:
 > http://groups.google.com/group/comp.sys.mac.system/topics?lnk

Thanks, but what is the point of a newsreader (in my case, it's 
Thunderbird), if I still have to switch to a web browser every time I'm 
about to post a question (which is not often, by the way)?
0
Anic297
12/23/2010 3:13:38 PM
In article <4d136723$0$4015$5402220f@news.sunrise.ch>, Anic297
<here@nowhere.com> wrote:

> nospam wrote:
> >> I can't search: articles expire as soon as they are 2 weeks old.
> >
> > they can be found via google.
> 
> Alan Browne wrote:
>  > http://groups.google.com/group/comp.sys.mac.system/topics?lnk
> 
> Thanks, but what is the point of a newsreader (in my case, it's 
> Thunderbird), if I still have to switch to a web browser every time I'm 
> about to post a question (which is not often, by the way)?

the point is that it doesn't matter how quickly your news provider
expires posts because google archives nearly everything posted on
usenet, going back many, many years.
0
nospam
12/23/2010 3:45:44 PM
On 10-12-23 10:13 , Anic297 wrote:
> nospam wrote:
>>> I can't search: articles expire as soon as they are 2 weeks old.
>>
>> they can be found via google.
>
> Alan Browne wrote:
>  > http://groups.google.com/group/comp.sys.mac.system/topics?lnk
>
> Thanks, but what is the point of a newsreader (in my case, it's
> Thunderbird), if I still have to switch to a web browser every time I'm
> about to post a question (which is not often, by the way)?

The newsreader is for active topics.  Where you ask questions or discuss 
something.  The expiry of posts on it depends on your news provider 
(mine holds text group messages for about 2 years) and the settings in 
your news reader.

When searching for past info, however, Google Groups is a huge store of 
group activity - often enough to find what you need (certainly helped me 
diagnose a strange disk issue).  Avoid posting from Google groups: some 
people (incl. me) block posts that originate at Google Groups.

-- 
gmail originated posts filtered due to spam.
0
Alan
12/23/2010 8:33:18 PM
In article 
<0ca73f5b-d5da-4c00-948e-74a57f611fb5@z19g2000yqb.googlegroups.com>,
 Le Chiffre <oraclmaster@gmail.com> wrote:

> On Dec 18, 9:42�am, Tom Stiller <tom_stil...@yahoo.com> wrote:
> > In article
> > <1c6a94b3-373c-4b81-a7ed-3103e1cef...@m37g2000vbn.googlegroups.com>,
> > �Le Chiffre <oraclmas...@gmail.com> wrote:
> >
> > > Besides restarting the computer?
> >
> > > Like from Terminal or something? I do a lot of simultaneous work, and
> > > that slows down my computer when it writes to the swap space, so I was
> > > wondering if besides using kill to kill running processes I can
> > > manually clear the swap space without restarting the computer.
> >
> > Why do you think *clearing* swap space would speed things up. �If your
> > simultaneous operations are swapping too much, you're short on RAM, not
> > "clear" swap space.
> >
> > --
> > Tom Stiller
> >
> > PGP fingerprint = �5108 DDB2 9761 EDE5 E7E3 �7BDA 71ED 6496 99C0 C7CF
> 
> I don't think it will speed things up, I just want to be able to clean
> things up after I'm done with my simultaneous processes. I've got 4 GB
> of RAM which is fine for most of my purposes except for the occasional
> hiccup in activity. I don't even touch swap most of the time, but when
> I do I like to clean up after myself.

Try logging out and then in again. THis certainly worked for me on OS X 
10.4 (where the whole system got slower once the total swap file sie 
exceeded 1.0 GB).

-- 
Paul Sture
0
Paul
12/27/2010 11:28:25 AM
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sys .mac
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is there a way ..... any way
Hello folks, I tried lurking on but it stays jibberish to me. Questions asked are responded with a jargon that is beyond my comprehension and often in a tone you'll think twice to ask the next question. So this is too heavy for me (yet?). Is there a way that simple mortals can ask questions how to do things with perl/ work with perl. Is there a newsgroup? ok ok RTFM you'll say. Obviously you don't understand my question and despair. Andries Meijer Andries wrote: > I tried lurking on but it stays jibberish to me. Questions asked > are responded with a jargon that is beyon...

Swap space
Hello, I have around 2 GB of swap space and would like to reduce it to something around 1 GB or 500 MB as I have 500MB RAM and seems I do not need that huge a swap space. Can I simply go ahead and change the swap partition, or will doing so affect my system in any way? I do not want to reinstall anything and my aim is to keep my current system running with only the swap space removed. Regards Marmagya In comp.os.linux.misc Marmagya <marmagya@enopatra_spam.com> wrote: > Can I simply go ahead and change the swap partition, For safety: boot in single-user-mode, disable th...

Swap Space
Can someone tell me how (or a link) to increase swap space on an SGI Octane. We upgraded the RAM to 1GB and I need to grow the swap space from 250Mb to 1.5Gb. I'm been thrown to the wolves with these boxes. I've got about 15 production machines I need to do this with. I was really hoping to do this without a total reconfig. Thanks, Mike-b In article <ec04b083.0308210627.5e962a2e@posting.google.com>, Mike-b <mb7387@yahoo.com> wrote: :Can someone tell me how (or a link) to increase swap space on an SGI :Octane. We upgraded the RAM to 1GB and I need to grow t...

Mac to mac
I just remembered these groups and wondered if someone here could tell me whether what I'd like to do is possible. (NO ONE around here knows anything about Macs) I have a G4 that was the top of the line in 1998. It will die one of these days. It's currently running OS 9.2.2. Someone else(who now lives far away) installed the internal modem, SCSI for my scanner, and my floppy drive (so I didn't have to go through hundreds of them for the bits and pieces I might someday want again). I still have the floppies and a number of Zips, all of which this computer can read. Install...

Around 40% swap space used but no swap activity as per sar.
Sending it once more by correcting the subject . One of our applications is leaking memory on a Prod host . The application hangs after sometime and we need to restart the application . ==== Tasks: 449 total, 1 running, 448 sleeping, 0 stopped, 0 zombie Cpu(s): 12.9% us, 0.1% sy, 0.0% ni, 87.0% id, 0.0% wa, 0.0% hi, 0.0% si Mem: 8160920k total, 8088752k used, 72168k free, 75516k buffers Swap: 8388600k total, 3651908k used, 4736692k free, 807556k cached PID USER PR NI %CPU TIME+ %MEM VIRT RES SHR S COMMAND 31712 nobody 16 0 100 28...

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