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remote job not finishing

I wrote a Scala program to develop and test a concept in air traffic contro=
l. It is a fast-time simulation that does lots of number crunching (with pa=
rallel processing), then it generates hundreds of plots at the end. A large=
 run can take several hours. I can run it on my Linux desktop machine at wo=
rk or my Linux portable at home (Ubuntu), and it runs to completion. Howeve=
r, when I tunnel in to my work machine from home and try to run it remotely=
, it almost never finishes. It does not even get to the part where it gener=
ates the plots. This is annoying because I would like to be able to run it =
on my work machine to avoid bogging down my home machine while I am using i=
t. I am using bash with ssh on Comcast Xfinity. When the program ends early=
, my Internet connection is usually still good as far as I can tell. Does a=
nyone have any ideas about what could be causing my program to terminate ea=
rly or how to diagnose it? Thanks.
0
Russ
12/17/2016 5:23:42 AM
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"Russ P." <Russ.Paielli@gmail.com> writes:

> I wrote a Scala program to develop and test a concept in air traffic
> control. It is a fast-time simulation that does lots of number
> crunching (with parallel processing), then it generates hundreds of
> plots at the end. A large run can take several hours. I can run it on
> my Linux desktop machine at work or my Linux portable at home
> (Ubuntu), and it runs to completion. However, when I tunnel in to my
> work machine from home and try to run it remotely, it almost never
> finishes. It does not even get to the part where it generates the
> plots. This is annoying because I would like to be able to run it on
> my work machine to avoid bogging down my home machine while I am using
> it. I am using bash with ssh on Comcast Xfinity. When the program ends
> early, my Internet connection is usually still good as far as I can
> tell. Does anyone have any ideas about what could be causing my
> program to terminate early or how to diagnose it? Thanks.

Use nohup in front of the command.

-- 
Dan Espen
0
Dan
12/17/2016 6:04:36 AM
That worked. Thanks!

On Friday, December 16, 2016 at 10:04:40 PM UTC-8, Dan Espen wrote:
> "Russ P." <Russ.P@gmail.con> writes:
> 
> > I wrote a Scala program to develop and test a concept in air traffic
> > control. It is a fast-time simulation that does lots of number
> > crunching (with parallel processing), then it generates hundreds of
> > plots at the end. A large run can take several hours. I can run it on
> > my Linux desktop machine at work or my Linux portable at home
> > (Ubuntu), and it runs to completion. However, when I tunnel in to my
> > work machine from home and try to run it remotely, it almost never
> > finishes. It does not even get to the part where it generates the
> > plots. This is annoying because I would like to be able to run it on
> > my work machine to avoid bogging down my home machine while I am using
> > it. I am using bash with ssh on Comcast Xfinity. When the program ends
> > early, my Internet connection is usually still good as far as I can
> > tell. Does anyone have any ideas about what could be causing my
> > program to terminate early or how to diagnose it? Thanks.
> 
> Use nohup in front of the command.
> 
> -- 
> Dan Espen

0
Russ
12/17/2016 7:15:32 PM
In article <f319b075-ee10-44ac-8ff5-2e63b3d40289@googlegroups.com>,
 "Russ P." <Russ.Paielli@gmail.com> wrote:

> I wrote a Scala program to develop and test a concept in air traffic control. 
> It is a fast-time simulation that does lots of number crunching (with 
> parallel processing), then it generates hundreds of plots at the end. A large 
> run can take several hours. I can run it on my Linux desktop machine at work 
> or my Linux portable at home (Ubuntu), and it runs to completion. However, 
> when I tunnel in to my work machine from home and try to run it remotely, it 
> almost never finishes. It does not even get to the part where it generates 
> the plots. This is annoying because I would like to be able to run it on my 
> work machine to avoid bogging down my home machine while I am using it. I am 
> using bash with ssh on Comcast Xfinity. When the program ends early, my 
> Internet connection is usually still good as far as I can tell. Does anyone 
> have any ideas about what could be causing my program to terminate early or 
> how to diagnose it? Thanks.

Use GNU screen or tmux so you can disconnect and leave it running, then 
later reconnect to it to see the result.

-- 
Barry Margolin, barmar@alum.mit.edu
Arlington, MA
*** PLEASE post questions in newsgroups, not directly to me ***
0
Barry
12/18/2016 3:28:51 AM
Barry Margolin <barmar@alum.mit.edu> writes:

> In article <f319b075-ee10-44ac-8ff5-2e63b3d40289@googlegroups.com>,
>  "Russ P." <Russ.Paielli@gmail.com> wrote:
>
>> I wrote a Scala program to develop and test a concept in air traffic control. 
>> It is a fast-time simulation that does lots of number crunching (with 
>> parallel processing), then it generates hundreds of plots at the end. A large 
>> run can take several hours. I can run it on my Linux desktop machine at work 
>> or my Linux portable at home (Ubuntu), and it runs to completion. However, 
>> when I tunnel in to my work machine from home and try to run it remotely, it 
>> almost never finishes. It does not even get to the part where it generates 
>> the plots. This is annoying because I would like to be able to run it on my 
>> work machine to avoid bogging down my home machine while I am using it. I am 
>> using bash with ssh on Comcast Xfinity. When the program ends early, my 
>> Internet connection is usually still good as far as I can tell. Does anyone 
>> have any ideas about what could be causing my program to terminate early or 
>> how to diagnose it? Thanks.
>
> Use GNU screen or tmux so you can disconnect and leave it running, then 
> later reconnect to it to see the result.

These are good, or perhaps superior suggestions vs. nohup.
I've heard of both but never used them.
I sort of suspected screen would be already present on
my Fedora system, but neither tmux nor screen was there.

So, the difference is tmux and screen allow for a reconnect
whereas, with nohup you can look in nohup.out to see progress
or results.

-- 
Dan Espen
0
Dan
12/18/2016 2:58:47 PM
Yeah, tmux and GNU screen are probably really knifty, and I should try one =
of them, but they are overkill for my current needs, and they don't seem to=
 be installed on my Ubuntu Linux machine. They are probably easy to install=
, but I don't recall how to do it off hand. I may google it after an approp=
riate period of procrastination.

On Sunday, December 18, 2016 at 6:58:52 AM UTC-8, Dan Espen wrote:
> Barry Margolin <barmar@alum.mit.edu> writes:
>=20
> > In article <f319b075-ee10-44ac-8ff5-2e63b3d40289@googlegroups.com>,
> >  "Russ P." <Russ.P@gmail.con> wrote:
> >
> >> I wrote a Scala program to develop and test a concept in air traffic c=
ontrol.=20
> >> It is a fast-time simulation that does lots of number crunching (with=
=20
> >> parallel processing), then it generates hundreds of plots at the end. =
A large=20
> >> run can take several hours. I can run it on my Linux desktop machine a=
t work=20
> >> or my Linux portable at home (Ubuntu), and it runs to completion. Howe=
ver,=20
> >> when I tunnel in to my work machine from home and try to run it remote=
ly, it=20
> >> almost never finishes. It does not even get to the part where it gener=
ates=20
> >> the plots. This is annoying because I would like to be able to run it =
on my=20
> >> work machine to avoid bogging down my home machine while I am using it=
.. I am=20
> >> using bash with ssh on Comcast Xfinity. When the program ends early, m=
y=20
> >> Internet connection is usually still good as far as I can tell. Does a=
nyone=20
> >> have any ideas about what could be causing my program to terminate ear=
ly or=20
> >> how to diagnose it? Thanks.
> >
> > Use GNU screen or tmux so you can disconnect and leave it running, then=
=20
> > later reconnect to it to see the result.
>=20
> These are good, or perhaps superior suggestions vs. nohup.
> I've heard of both but never used them.
> I sort of suspected screen would be already present on
> my Fedora system, but neither tmux nor screen was there.
>=20
> So, the difference is tmux and screen allow for a reconnect
> whereas, with nohup you can look in nohup.out to see progress
> or results.
>=20
> --=20
> Dan Espen

0
Russ
12/18/2016 9:43:59 PM
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