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Dot over a letter

Hello,

In order to write 'dot' time derivatives I need to place a dot over variable
name (like \dot{x}). Is it possible to do it with gnuplot?

thanks in advance,
Jack


0
Krzaczor
2/12/2004 2:45:54 PM
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Krzaczor <fi3nd@gazeta.pl> wrote:
> Hello,

> In order to write 'dot' time derivatives I need to place a dot over variable
> name (like \dot{x}). Is it possible to do it with gnuplot?

That very much depends on what terminal driver you're using.  Using
one of the TeX family, including pslatex, it's blatantly obvious:
'$\dot{x}$'.  Using the 'enhanced' option of the PostScript driver
(and recently some others), you can do it, too: see "help enhanced".
On most others, it's quite likely impossible.

-- 
Hans-Bernhard Broeker (broeker@physik.rwth-aachen.de)
Even if all the snow were burnt, ashes would remain.
0
Hans
2/12/2004 2:55:56 PM
>
> > In order to write 'dot' time derivatives I need to place a dot over
variable
> > name (like \dot{x}). Is it possible to do it with gnuplot?
>
> That very much depends on what terminal driver you're using.  Using
> one of the TeX family, including pslatex, it's blatantly obvious:
> '$\dot{x}$'.  Using the 'enhanced' option of the PostScript driver
> (and recently some others), you can do it, too: see "help enhanced".
> On most others, it's quite likely impossible.
>

I use enhanced PostScript driver (gnuplot version 3.8j patchlevel 0) and for
now something like this: ~x{\307} but it doesn't look very good. The problem
is that I can't shift the overprinted text vertically: ~x{.8a}doesn't differ
from ~x{a} in the output .eps file (and I really don't know why).

thank you for help,
Jack


0
Krzaczor
2/12/2004 3:32:39 PM
Krzaczor <fi3nd@gazeta.pl> wrote:

> I use enhanced PostScript driver (gnuplot version 3.8j patchlevel 0) and for
> now something like this: ~x{\307} but it doesn't look very good. The problem
> is that I can't shift the overprinted text vertically: ~x{.8a}doesn't differ
> from ~x{a} in the output .eps file (and I really don't know why).

Did you check that .8 isn't the default displacement?  I.e. did you
check other numeric values than .8?  I just tried .8 and 1.5, and
there sure does seem to be a difference, both in the .eps file
contents and in appearance.

-- 
Hans-Bernhard Broeker (broeker@physik.rwth-aachen.de)
Even if all the snow were burnt, ashes would remain.
0
Hans
2/12/2004 4:28:36 PM
>
> Did you check that .8 isn't the default displacement?  I.e. did you
> check other numeric values than .8?  I just tried .8 and 1.5, and
> there sure does seem to be a difference, both in the .eps file
> contents and in appearance.
>
I surely tried diffrent values -- there is no change in the .eps file.
Eventually I'll edit .eps by hand :)

Jack


0
Krzaczor
2/12/2004 4:49:23 PM
In article <c0g6ao$69l$1@inews.gazeta.pl>, Krzaczor <fi3nd@gazeta.pl> wrote:
>
>>
>> > In order to write 'dot' time derivatives I need to place a dot over
>variable
>> > name (like \dot{x}). Is it possible to do it with gnuplot?
>>
>I use enhanced PostScript driver (gnuplot version 3.8j patchlevel 0) and for
>now something like this: ~x{\307} but it doesn't look very good. The problem
>is that I can't shift the overprinted text vertically: ~x{.8a}doesn't differ
>from ~x{a} in the output .eps file (and I really don't know why).

That was a bug, but it was fixed recently in the CVS version.
-- 
Ethan A Merritt
0
merritt
2/12/2004 8:30:30 PM
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