f



no value in Scheme

or any of the other weird languages.  This is a sweeping exaggeration,
but it's been mostly true for me.

Why me?  Almost 3 years ago, I had a train wreck with 3D graphics, C++,
and a spherical hexified icosahedron.  This was during the dot.com
bust.  It pretty much ended whatever semblance of a career I had, and
ultimately led me to bankruptcy.  C++ was pretty clearly a failure for
"geometric glue" problems, i.e. knocking together structural
relationships quickly.  C++ was also a lousy prototyping language.
Really the only thing C++ has going for it is speed, at the expense of
pain.  And familiarity.

Familiarity.

I thought, "Should I use a better language?"  I thought, "Should I use
other people's open source code?"  I spent nearly the next 3 years
pursuing both avenues.  This has led me... nowhere.  Well, ok, I'm
wiser in the theoretical underpinnings of computerdom.  But that's it.
I have nothing else to show for it.  From a productivity standpoint,
chasing the unfamiliar has been a complete waste of time.

I can't honestly tell anybody to use advanced programming languages.
The tools associated with them often suck, because they lack critical
mass.  Maybe that's not true in some problem domains, maybe some
problem domains are well trodden and one gets along fine.  It's a
really lousy situation in 3D graphics though.  Let's face it, the rest
of the world is doing C++ and only mavericks ever try anything else.
It's a disappointing reality but if you piss in the wind long enough
and hard enough, you realize how wet and stinky and yellow you are.

The learning curves, both for new language paradigms and for the tools,
are long.  It wouldn't be so bad if Scheme were industry standard, if
we all started on it back in college, if all the tools were written in
it, and we just had years and years and years of tedious leveraged
experience.  I don't see any fundamental barriers to understanding
Scheme.  But it takes a long time, and the learning curve everyone else
invested in is C/C++.  Why should I ever tell a proficient C/C++
programmer to drop what he's doing and do something else?

Sure, every program over X size has invented half of Lisp / Scheme
whatever in it.  THAT MAY VERY WELL BE FASTER AND MORE PRODUCTIVE than
bothering with completely different languages and toolchains.  I mean,
what kind of stuff could I have written in 3 years if I had continued
with the crappy inelegant C++ shit I already had to start with?

There's no money in this.  There's no business model in this.  There's
only endless chasing around and around of yet another broken tool.  Yet
another clumsy solution that 1 guy on the internet cooked up somewhere,
that sorta works, or sorta doesn't.  Open Source is described by some
as "Open Sores."

Am I done with Scheme?  Oddly enough, not yet.  You see, I think the
entire computer industry is complete shit.  So, I might as well use
Scheme!  I'm merely *wishing* that it was possible for me to have kept
going, 3 years ago, with that C++ torture code.  But it wasn't.  It was
too shitty.  So I went out and found other ways to do things that are
shitty.  Different kind of shit.  Six of one, half dozen of the other.
Maybe I will eventually say been there, done that, and collect all 10
t-shirts.  For now, I'm more optimistic about turning Scheme into
something that isn't shit, than I am about C++.  C++ is an evolutionary
dead end; Scheme is an invitation to do buckets more work in the hope
of *someday* realizing something that isn't shit.

Man was I a fool to think I could take on all these problems of
industry single handedly.  When you don't have a paycheck for your
computer work, and no kind of student support either, and you have to
hold an irrelevant day job to stay afloat, you realize how totally
overwhelming, unproductive, and completely shitty the entire world of
computerdom is.  Big bucks are the only lubrication that make it
palatable.  Well, unless there's a way to run off to the Third World
where it's cheap, so I can sit around and code and not be bothered for
a long time....

Oh, and yes I still run SeaFunc.  And it still meets every 3 weeks, and
plenty of really good functional programmers attend it.  It doesn't
require me, it has a life of its own, I could hand over the
announcement job to someone else at any time.  Oh, and I'm still
working on CMake builds for Chicken Scheme.  Chicken hasn't
specifically failed me yet; there's just way more work to "put things
right" on Windows than I ever wanted there to be.  If I had had
foresight, I might not have done it.  In hindsight, I've made progress,
so I keep going.

I'm just done pretending that all of this is anything but historical
circumstance.  I'm on a trajectory, which I think will eventually lead
me to The Way.  I just think it's going to be years in coming.  Things
are that bad.  Do you ever wake up and realize just how bad all this
computer stuff really is?  How cottage industry it all is?  We're in
the stone ages.  We're not that far above sticking wires into boards
and making little beeps and blips.

BEEP!
<boop>

BEEP!
<boop>

Cheers,
Brandon Van Every
"The pioneer is the one with the arrows in his back."
                          - anonymous entrepreneur

0
SeaFuncSpam (366)
3/13/2006 8:28:22 AM
comp.lang.scheme 4781 articles. 0 followers. Post Follow

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SeaFuncSpam@gmail.com wrote:
>
> Oh, and yes I still run SeaFunc.  And it still meets every 3 weeks, and
> plenty of really good functional programmers attend it.  It doesn't
> require me, it has a life of its own, I could hand over the
> announcement job to someone else at any time.

I decided that time is now.
(new (Cruise (Director (of SeaFunc))))
Coming Soon!

0
SeaFuncSpam (366)
3/13/2006 9:41:20 AM
SeaFuncSpam@gmail.com schrieb:

>
> I'm just done pretending that all of this is anything but historical
> circumstance.  I'm on a trajectory, which I think will eventually lead
> me to The Way.  I just think it's going to be years in coming.  Things
> are that bad.  Do you ever wake up and realize just how bad all this
> computer stuff really is?  How cottage industry it all is?  We're in
> the stone ages.  We're not that far above sticking wires into boards
> and making little beeps and blips.

Yes. I have this feeling once a week, usually. You just have to
get used to it. And try to make it a tiny little bit better.


cheers,
felix

0
bunny351 (88)
3/13/2006 10:29:19 AM
bunny351@yoho-gmail.com wrote:
> SeaFuncSpam@gmail.com schrieb:
>
> >
> > I'm just done pretending that all of this is anything but historical
> > circumstance.  I'm on a trajectory, which I think will eventually lead
> > me to The Way.  I just think it's going to be years in coming.  Things
> > are that bad.  Do you ever wake up and realize just how bad all this
> > computer stuff really is?  How cottage industry it all is?  We're in
> > the stone ages.  We're not that far above sticking wires into boards
> > and making little beeps and blips.
>
> Yes. I have this feeling once a week, usually. You just have to
> get used to it. And try to make it a tiny little bit better.

Good to know that I'm not alone.  BTW, my comments are not meant to
reflect badly on Chicken Scheme.  Working with you, and also the CMake
guys, are among the more positive things that have happened in the past
2 years.  Really that's a lot of my reason to continue; that and the
sense that I'm "not done" yet.


Cheers,
Brandon Van Every

0
SeaFuncSpam (366)
3/13/2006 12:06:55 PM
SeaFuncSpam@gmail.com schrieb:

> >
> > Yes. I have this feeling once a week, usually. You just have to
> > get used to it. And try to make it a tiny little bit better.
>
> Good to know that I'm not alone.  BTW, my comments are not meant to
> reflect badly on Chicken Scheme.  Working with you, and also the CMake
> guys, are among the more positive things that have happened in the past
> 2 years.  Really that's a lot of my reason to continue; that and the
> sense that I'm "not done" yet.

Oh, I didn't take it badly in any way. Software sucks, it's a fact. But
it can
also be fun trying to improve the situation.

Thanks for your support, Brandon!


cheers,
felix

0
bunny351 (88)
3/14/2006 7:10:38 AM
THINGS YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT BRANDON J. VAN EVERY BEFORE REPLYING TO
ONE OF HIS POSTS

1.  He has never designed any game, nor contributed to the design of
    any game, which has ever seen the light of day, despite referring
    to himself as a "game designer."  (In rebuttal, he pointed out his
    "one complete game" from "1983" on the "Atari 800" which he showed
    to his "8th grade math teacher.")

2.  He has never been employed in the game industry, in any way,
    shape, manner or form.  Despite this, for some reason he managed
    to get named as an Independent Games Festival judge; a curious
    turn of events, since their stated intent is to appoint
    "professionals in the game industry" (their quote, not his).

3.  In fact, the only programming job he had listed on his resume was
    for only "2 years" ending in "1998," working in C and assembly on
    a graphics driver, as a "Sr. Software Engineer" -- a curious
    title, since this was his first (and only) job in the software
    industry.  There is no evidence he has used C++, nor any other
    language, professionally.  (And the company in question is
    defunct, anyway, so there is no way to verify his claim.)

4.  The other jobs he has mentioned having after this one and only
    item on his resume are: "yard maintenance work," "painting
    apartments," "scrubbing floors," "sub minimum wage signature
    gathering," and working for "$5/hour at a Vietnamese restaurant."

5.  The only personal project he actually wrote code for and released
    in some fashion was Free3d, a software 3D rendering engine.
    Stating that its goals were to be "100% efficient, 100% portable"
    and to release it in a "one year time frame," he started in "1993"
    and abandoned it in "1996," admitting that it "barely drew even a
    single polygon" and "did hardly anything in the 3D department."

6.  Almost every Internet community (Usenet newsgroup, mailing list,
    etc.) he has ever introduced himself to has resulted in him
    repeating the same pattern: asking leading questions, demanding
    people do things his way, becoming hostile, annoying the other
    participants, alienating them, and finally leaving in disgust.

7.  Of the projects (open source and otherwise) whose communities he
    has (briefly) joined, he has never contributed anything tangible
    in terms of code or documentation.

8.  The project he has intermittently claimed to be working on, Ocean
    Mars, is vaporware -- and is one of his admitted "failures."  He
    allegedly sunk "nine months of full time 60 hours/week" and about
    "$60K" into it with only a "spherical hexified icosahedron"
    display to show for it (only allegedly, since it has never been
    shown or demonstrated publicly).  Ultimately he filed for a
    "Chapter 7" "bankruptcy of $82K," since he was "completely
    destitute" and "had no earning power to ever pay the money back."

9.  Since his embarassing frustration with his Ocean Mars project, he
    has decided that C and C++ aren't "worth anything as a resume
    skill anymore," and embarked on a quest in 2003 to find a
    high-level language that will suit his needs.  After more than a
    year, at least ten languages, and not having even "written a line
    of code" in any of them, he still has yet to find a language that
    will suit him.

10. Finally, despite vehemently insisting that he is not a troll, many
    people quite understandingly have great difficulty distinguishing
    his public behavior from that of a troll.

0
3/19/2006 4:25:08 AM
fredaster122@yahoo.com wrote:
> THINGS YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT BRANDON J. VAN EVERY BEFORE REPLYING
> TO ONE OF HIS POSTS [....]

Everything you say may more may not be true.  There may or may
not be more to the story than you say.   Regardless, it is not your
place to say such things.

It is not your role to protect the participants in this forum from
themselves.  Not in that way, at least.

Thanks,
-t

0
lord2845 (83)
3/19/2006 4:02:26 PM
fredaster122@yahoo.com wrote:
> THINGS YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT BRANDON J. VAN EVERY BEFORE REPLYING TO
> ONE OF HIS POSTS
> 
.....

And another thing everybody should know is that Mr Every has managed
to anger the Scientologists, who now repeatedly undertake smear
campaigns against him here and on comp.lang.lisp - and presumably
elsewhere as well.

In general, the opinion of someone who has nothing to say about scheme
or lisp here, regarding another poster, is not and IMO should not be
valued. It's offtopic for starters, and rude.

As regards the alleged behaviors that this post warns about, I've
seen a lot of his posts and haven't observed them. If the above
poster were at all interested in warning us about Trolls, rather
than in being the pathetic pawn of someone pursuing a religious
vendetta, I'm sure that other posters well known to us (initials XL)
would have been the subject of this "warning" instead.

					Bear

0
bear (1219)
3/19/2006 4:22:11 PM
Tom Lord wrote:
> fredaster122@yahoo.com wrote:
> > THINGS YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT BRANDON J. VAN EVERY BEFORE REPLYING
> > TO ONE OF HIS POSTS [....]
>
> Everything you say may more may not be true.  There may or may
> not be more to the story than you say.   Regardless, it is not your
> place to say such things.
>
> It is not your role to protect the participants in this forum from
> themselves.  Not in that way, at least.
>
> Thanks,
> -t
Nor is it your role to  judge Mr. Aster's 's role. I happen to agree
with his evaluation of Mr. Van Every's posts, having seen them in other
forums myself. While I chose not to take Mr. Van Every on, Mr. Aster
has every right to do so. You have the right to ignore him, as I ignore
Mr. Van Every.

You also have the right to disparage Mr. Aster, as he disparages Mr.
Van Every. As you imply, we all have a duty to ourselves to censor out
the noise.

Pat King

0
3/21/2006 4:43:27 AM
Regular readers: skip the entire subthread, please.

Please Mr. King, do elaborate.   I am intrigued by yr ideas
and wish to subscribe to yr magazine.

Frankly, I don't think there's enough ad hominem attacks
on usenet and I haven't been sure what to do about it.

My main complaint about fredaster was that his attempt
was so ... I dunno ... transparent.  Too easily ignored as if
it were some kind of utterly unworthy crap.

You, on the other hand, seem to have the beginings of a
talent for dressing such crap with a nice sauce of pseudo-
intellectualism so as to make it pallatable.  Please, let us
learn more of yr skills.  Give us a further example, if
you will.

-t

p.s.: please be sure to work some keywords like "closures"
or "continuations" into yr reply.  Those and similar seem to
be essential on this group, though I don't find words to tell
you why.



Slow Thought wrote:
> Tom Lord wrote:
> > fredaster122@yahoo.com wrote:
> > > THINGS YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT BRANDON J. VAN EVERY BEFORE REPLYING
> > > TO ONE OF HIS POSTS [....]
> >
> > Everything you say may more may not be true.  There may or may
> > not be more to the story than you say.   Regardless, it is not your
> > place to say such things.
> >
> > It is not your role to protect the participants in this forum from
> > themselves.  Not in that way, at least.
> >
> > Thanks,
> > -t
> Nor is it your role to  judge Mr. Aster's 's role. I happen to agree
> with his evaluation of Mr. Van Every's posts, having seen them in other
> forums myself. While I chose not to take Mr. Van Every on, Mr. Aster
> has every right to do so. You have the right to ignore him, as I ignore
> Mr. Van Every.
>
> You also have the right to disparage Mr. Aster, as he disparages Mr.
> Van Every. As you imply, we all have a duty to ourselves to censor out
> the noise.
> 
> Pat King

0
lord2845 (83)
3/21/2006 8:23:21 AM
Hmm.   Subtlety has never been my strong point.

O F'n Well,
-t



Tom Lord wrote:
> Regular readers: skip the entire subthread, please.
>
> Please Mr. King, do elaborate.   I am intrigued by yr ideas
> and wish to subscribe to yr magazine.
>
> Frankly, I don't think there's enough ad hominem attacks
> on usenet and I haven't been sure what to do about it.
>
> My main complaint about fredaster was that his attempt
> was so ... I dunno ... transparent.  Too easily ignored as if
> it were some kind of utterly unworthy crap.
>
> You, on the other hand, seem to have the beginings of a
> talent for dressing such crap with a nice sauce of pseudo-
> intellectualism so as to make it pallatable.  Please, let us
> learn more of yr skills.  Give us a further example, if
> you will.
>
> -t
>
> p.s.: please be sure to work some keywords like "closures"
> or "continuations" into yr reply.  Those and similar seem to
> be essential on this group, though I don't find words to tell
> you why.
>
>
>
> Slow Thought wrote:
> > Tom Lord wrote:
> > > fredaster122@yahoo.com wrote:
> > > > THINGS YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT BRANDON J. VAN EVERY BEFORE REPLYING
> > > > TO ONE OF HIS POSTS [....]
> > >
> > > Everything you say may more may not be true.  There may or may
> > > not be more to the story than you say.   Regardless, it is not your
> > > place to say such things.
> > >
> > > It is not your role to protect the participants in this forum from
> > > themselves.  Not in that way, at least.
> > >
> > > Thanks,
> > > -t
> > Nor is it your role to  judge Mr. Aster's 's role. I happen to agree
> > with his evaluation of Mr. Van Every's posts, having seen them in other
> > forums myself. While I chose not to take Mr. Van Every on, Mr. Aster
> > has every right to do so. You have the right to ignore him, as I ignore
> > Mr. Van Every.
> >
> > You also have the right to disparage Mr. Aster, as he disparages Mr.
> > Van Every. As you imply, we all have a duty to ourselves to censor out
> > the noise.
> > 
> > Pat King

0
lord2845 (83)
3/21/2006 8:27:56 AM
Reply:

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I am developing a code for symbolical computations (not general purpose) with quadratic surds and rationals, some thousand - thousand- a-half lines of GNU-MIT scheme, and I am encountering from time to time memory related errors as "Out of memory" and "Maximum recursion depth exceeded". An important part of my code deals with merging two sorted files, each line beeing a scheme object, into a unique sorted file. I am using no ready-made libraries. Maybe someone can help me in finding a library, defining a function that takes two input files, one output file and a predicate for comparing two elements, and manages the work by itself? Some other questions: Is there a way to extract a dependency graph from my rather spaghetti code? Is there a way to decide statically wheter my functions do really always behave as tail-recursive (as I intended)? Is there a way of profiling my scheme code, so that I can select the data on which my code behaves badly? Thanks in advance Alex ...

New Wraith Scheme, Pixie Scheme II, and Pixie Scheme III, and source available now.
Today I released version 2.14 of Wraith Scheme and version 1.01 of Pixie Scheme II. Today also, version 1.00 of Pixie Scheme III was released to the App Store. Wraith Scheme 2.14 is a shareware and open-source full R5 Scheme implementation for the Apple Macintosh, with enhancements for parallel processing, by which I mean multiple copies of the Wraith Scheme application (separate Unix processes) all running at once, sharing Scheme main memory. Wraith Scheme 2.14 is a full 64-bit Macintosh application, that only runs on Macintoshes with Intel processors that can execute 64-bit code, and that are running at least MacOS 10.6 (Snow Leopard). Wraith Scheme 2.14 fixes a few minor bugs and adds a few new utility procedures. See the "What's New" section of the Wraith Scheme Help File (available from the Help Menu within the application) for additional information. Pixie Scheme II 1.01 is a shareware and open-source Scheme implementation for the Apple Macintosh, which is almost R5: It is in great part a design prototype for a possible iPad implementation of Scheme, and since the iPad generally hides its underlying Unix file system from users, Pixie Scheme II does not have any of the R5 procedures for access to files. Pixie Scheme II does have many of the enhancements that Wraith Scheme has. Pixie Scheme II has a rather different graphical user interface than does Wraith Scheme, which is both more iPad-like and more like the graphical user interface of the origina...

New Wraith Scheme, Pixie Scheme II, and Pixie Scheme III, and source available now. #2
Today I released version 2.14 of Wraith Scheme and version 1.01 of Pixie Scheme II. Today also, version 1.00 of Pixie Scheme III was released to the App Store. Wraith Scheme 2.14 is a shareware and open-source full R5 Scheme implementation for the Apple Macintosh, with enhancements for parallel processing, by which I mean multiple copies of the Wraith Scheme application (separate Unix processes) all running at once, sharing Scheme main memory. Wraith Scheme 2.14 is a full 64-bit Macintosh application, that only runs on Macintoshes with Intel processors that can execute 64-bit code, and that are running at least MacOS 10.6 (Snow Leopard). Wraith Scheme 2.14 fixes a few minor bugs and adds a few new utility procedures. See the "What's New" section of the Wraith Scheme Help File (available from the Help Menu within the application) for additional information. Pixie Scheme II 1.01 is a shareware and open-source Scheme implementation for the Apple Macintosh, which is almost R5: It is in great part a design prototype for a possible iPad implementation of Scheme, and since the iPad generally hides its underlying Unix file system from users, Pixie Scheme II does not have any of the R5 procedures for access to files. Pixie Scheme II does have many of the enhancements that Wraith Scheme has. Pixie Scheme II has a rather different graphical user interface than does Wraith Scheme, which is both more iPad-like and more like the graphical user interface of the origina...

Do scheme programmers *read* scheme programs?
Of course they do, but what I mean is the following: when I read a book, I internally "vocalize" the words as I read them, and to a large extent this is what I mean by "reading". When I read say a C program it is (for the most part) much of the same. When I see for(i=0;i<100;i++); I mentally vocalize "for eye equals zero, eye less than 100, eye plus plus" On the other hand, I find that even though I can read and even (sometimes) write short scheme programs I do so more as a problem in pattern recognition/understanding without (much) internal vocalization. As an experiment, I wrote a short VBScript program that takes any text file you feed it and reads it out loud line by line using a text-to-speech engine. When I feed it a short C program I can to some extend listen along and have at least some idea of the meaning of the code as I hear it. When I feed it a short scheme program the result strikes me as surreal- almost like a schizophrenic word salad. So my main question is: are experienced Scheme programmers just so much more fluent in the language that they get to the point that they can "read" it in close to the traditional sense, or are they engaged in a different sort of cognitive activity. This second possibility doesn't strike me as absurd: at one time "reading" meant reading out loud or at least with your lips moving, and the advent of silent reading seemed like a radical deperture. Maybe scheme programmers h...

Scheme in Basic, Scheme-2-Basic
I'm looking for a scheme interpreter written in BASIC, preferable Visual Basic --- and most preferably Visual Basic for Applications. A Scheme to BASIC translator would also be great. I'm in an environment where I need to write some software and the only development environment I have is Microsoft Office Visual Basic for Applications. (The security 'droids have conclued that because MS Office is "standard," VBA must be "safe.") If you can help me please respond with a copy to pcolsen@comcast.net Engineer wrote: > I'm in an environment where I need to write some software and the only > development environment I have is Microsoft Office Visual Basic for > Applications. (The security 'droids have conclued that because MS > Office is "standard," VBA must be "safe.") Not exactly what you are asking for, but here is a way to call Scheme from VBA among other: <http://www.plt-scheme.org/software/mzcom/> --=20 Jens Axel S=F8gaard Thanks for the pointer. Unfortunately the only programming language to which I have access is VBA for Microsoft Office. Organization policy forbids "development" on my machine. Luckily the security 'droids don't consider writing VBA macros as "development." Anything I do must be bootstrapped from VBA. "Engineer" <pcolsen@comcast.net> writes: > Unfortunately the only programming language to which I have access is &...

About flag value in scheme
Hello, I'm currently in the process of learning scheme. So I'm working on some exercices to clear out scheme syntax and semantics. So I got an exercise in which I should write a semi-predicate which yield #f if the number n is not a power of two or k, k is n=2^k The thing I could not clear out is the use of what I called "flag value", that is (+ k2 1). Does it operate on the value of (power-two (quotient n 2)) which is O for true or 1 for false or is it sth else which I can't understand? Thx Here is the code: (define (power-of-two n) (if (= n 0) 0 (if (even? n) (let ((k2 (power-of-two (quotient n 2)))) (if k2 ;; here is what i call "flag value" ;; I cant figure out what is really incremented here.. (+ k2 1) #f)) #f))) Guillaume R. skrev: > Hello, > I'm currently in the process of learning scheme. So I'm working on > some exercices to clear out scheme syntax and semantics. > So I got an exercise in which I should write > a semi-predicate which yield #f if the number n is not a power of two or k, k is n=2^k > The thing I could not clear out is the use of what I called "flag value", that is (+ k2 1). The expression (if <e1> <e2> <e3>) is evaluated like this: 1. The expressions <e1> is evaluated. Call the result r1. 2. If the r1 isn't #f (false) then t...

SchemEd
The author of SymLibEd, part of the circuit editor program SchemEd, says that to enable the program to be run on the Iyonix the Castle Toolbox Module should be replaced with the RO Toolbox. My Iyonix is stable and I find the thought of making this change unattractive. Are there any alternatives or am I worrying unneccessarily. Malcolm Smith -- T M Smith in North Yorkshire, England Using an Iyonix and RiscOS 5.11.3 In article <ff14ec124e.tmsmith@tmsmith.freeuk.com>, Malcolm Smith <tmsmith@freeuk.com> wrote: > The author of SymLibEd, part of the circuit editor program SchemEd, > says that to enable the program to be run on the Iyonix the Castle > Toolbox Module should be replaced with the RO Toolbox. > My Iyonix is stable and I find the thought of making this change > unattractive. > Are there any alternatives or am I worrying unneccessarily. You are worrying unnecessarily. John -- John Williams, Wirral, Merseyside, UK - no attachments to these addresses! Non-RISC OS posters change user to johnrwilliams or put 'risc' in subject for reliable contact! Who is John Williams? http://www.picindex.info/author/ In article <ff14ec124e.tmsmith@tmsmith.freeuk.com>, Malcolm Smith <tmsmith@freeuk.com> wrote: > The author of SymLibEd, part of the circuit editor program SchemEd, > says that to enable the program to be run on the Iyonix the Castle > Toolbox Module should be replaced with the RO Toolbox. > ...

[Ann] dot-scheme: a PLT Scheme interface to .NET
Hi there, I have been working on a FFI for PLT Scheme and the .NET framework and I have reached a point were I think the code might be useful for others. If you are interested take a look at: http://www.rivendell.ws/dot-scheme Appended below is a MS SqlServer OLE-DB interface built on top of dot-scheme. This should give an idea of how dot-scheme can be used. Criticisms or insights are quite welcome. -pp ; dot-db provides access to OLE-DB databases through scheme ; use: ; `open-connection' to well, open a connection ; `close-connection' to close it ; `execute-sql' to execute queries against an open connection (module dot-db mzscheme (provide open-connection close-connection execute-sql) (require (lib "etc.ss") (lib "system.data.ss" "dot-net") (lib "dot-utils.ss" "dot-scheme")) (define-struct connection (obj)) ; (database server) -> connection ; opens a ole-db connection to `database' on `server' using integrated ; NT security. returns the ; opened connection object. (define (open-connection database server) ; ::ole-db-connection is a dot-scheme object that represents the ; OleDbConnection .NET data type. new is a procedure that invokes ; the .NET construtor for the specified type. Note that scheme ; strings are automatically transalated to their .NET counterparts. (let ((c (new ::ole-db-conne...

Interacting Scheme and Fortran; what is in store for Scheme in terms of scripting
Hia all Is there any reason why no one posts code showing how to use Scheme for scripting? I have never done any serious Unix scripting. However, recently a colleague shared his Fortran code with me. The Fortran program got all its input from a .sh script. For example: == .... while ( $MONTHCOUNT <= $NMONTH ) ../FORTAN_PROGRAM.out << EOF $YEARS[$YEARCOUNT] $MONTH[$MONTHCOUNT] $MONTHTAG[$MONTHCOUNT] $GOME $MODEL $OUT $LONMIN $LONMAX $LATMIN $LATMAX $HARDYEAR $FILE_TYPE EOF @ MONTHCOUNT ++ .... == How would that look like in Scheme? Is Bigloo capable of doing this? Or which Scheme might be a good .sh replacement? Thanks, Schneewittchen frankenstein <klohmuschel@yahoo.de> writes: > Hia all > > Is there any reason why no one posts code showing how to use Scheme > for scripting? > > I have never done any serious Unix scripting. However, recently a > colleague shared his Fortran code with me. The Fortran program got all > its input from a .sh script. > > > For example: > while ( $MONTHCOUNT <= $NMONTH ) > ./FORTAN_PROGRAM.out << EOF > $YEARS[$YEARCOUNT] > $MONTH[$MONTHCOUNT] > $MONTHTAG[$MONTHCOUNT] > $GOME > $MODEL > $OUT > $LONMIN > $LONMAX > $LATMIN > $LATMAX > $HARDYEAR > $FILE_TYPE > EOF > @ MONTHCOUNT ++ This is not a fortran script. This is a shell script. (csh I assume). > How would that look like in Scheme? Is Bigloo capable of doing this? > O...

getting set up to learn some scheme with mit scheme and sicp
I guess this si the most straightforward way to learn scheme I tried plt scheme, it was cool, scsh i could not make head nor tail of docs wise; but I heard that sicp is the best book for learning programming... gavino wrote: > I guess this si the most straightforward way to learn scheme > > I tried plt scheme, it was cool, scsh i could not make head nor tail of > docs wise; but I heard that sicp is the best book for learning > programming... How to Design Programs/PLT Scheme is a good combo as well. I got to ch4, and eyes glazed over. Was fun though. Scheme seems to make everything little chains of computations, kinda cool, and easy to define new procs..... sicp has been around longer no? gavino wrote: > I got to ch4, and eyes glazed over. > Was fun though. > Scheme seems to make everything little chains of computations, kinda > cool, and easy to define new procs..... > > sicp has been around longer no? > Yah, SICP has been around since early-80's I think. It's a much "heavier" book in terms of theory and technique. Bear Ray Dillinger <bear@sonic.net> writes: > gavino wrote: > > I got to ch4, and eyes glazed over. > > Was fun though. > > Scheme seems to make everything little chains of computations, kinda > > cool, and easy to define new procs..... > > sicp has been around longer no? > > > > Yah, SICP has been around since early-80's I think. >...

how to run script with umb-scheme and have scheme exit afterwards?
I am brand new to scheme. How to I run a file, call it temp.scm, and have umb-scheme not leave me at a umb-scheme prompt? jani@persian.com (Jani Yusef) wrote in message news:<d3be1825.0407191806.74bb860b@posting.google.com>... > I am brand new to scheme. How to I run a file, call it temp.scm, and > have umb-scheme not leave me at a umb-scheme prompt? I can't answer your question, but .... Have you considered using another implementation? My impression is that umb-scheme is a toy Scheme and is not widely used (although, for some unfathomable reason, it often comes with Linux distributions). For newbies, DrScheme (http://www.drscheme.org/) is usually a good recommendation. -- G. ...

Pixie Scheme III -- Scheme on the iPad (*NOT* a release notice...)
I gave a talk about my iPad Scheme implementation, Pixie Scheme III, locally in the San Francisco area a few weeks ago, and happened to see a little interest in it on the Internet, so thought I had better post something here: I *do* have an R5 Scheme running under iOS on the iPad. It includes all required features of R5 Scheme except for file-system access (since the iPad pretty much doesn't allow user access to the underlying Unix file system), plus numerous enhancements. Pixie Scheme III much resembles my Macintosh Scheme application, Wraith Scheme, though with more of an iPad style user interface. For further information about Wraith Scheme, see the Software page of my web site, whose home page is http://web.mac.com/Jay_Reynolds_Freeman Pixie Scheme III is *not* in the App Store at the moment. I am still chasing a few bugs and tweaking the user interface. I will quite likely submit it for approval within the next month or two, and if Apple accepts it, I will post here. If Apple does not accept it, it is possible that I will release source code anyway, so that Schemers who are also Xcode/iOS developers can install it themselves and have it to play with. Time will tell. Anyone who has specific questions is welcome to send me EMail. ...

R5 release of Wraith Scheme (shareware scheme for Macintosh)
I have a new R5 release of Wraith Scheme, which is a shareware Scheme implementation for the Apple Macintosh, available for download from the "software" page of my personal web site: http://web.mac.com/Jay_Reynolds_Freeman What follows are portions of the "README" file for the current distribution. This "README" file accompanies the fourth release of Wraith Scheme, version 1.20, release date 8 June, 2007. Wraith Scheme is an implementation of the "R5" version of the Scheme programming language for the Apple Macintosh (trademark). Wraith Scheme was written by me, Jay Reynolds Freeman, and is copyright Jay Reynolds Freeman, 2007. Wraith Scheme is shareware: You are welcome to use Wraith Scheme for free, forever, and to pass out free copies of it to anybody else. If you would like to make a shareware donation for it, that's fine, and there is information in the program about how to go about it, but in no sense do I request, insist, or expect that you do so. [...] System Requirements: Wraith Scheme requires an Apple Macintosh running OS X 10.4 or later. The application takes up about 2.3 MByte of storage on disk, and can run usefully in as little as 10 MByte of memory. Wraith Scheme is Universal Binary (trademark), and should run equally well on Macintoshes using Intel microprocessors and on Macintoshes using PowerPC (t...

Wraith Scheme and Pixie Scheme III have new web site.
I am the developer and supporter of Wraith Scheme (for the Macintosh) and of Pixie Scheme III (for the iPad). As of today, with Apple phasing out support for web sites, they have new homes on my new web site: Main Web Site: http://JayReynoldsFreeman.com Software Page (with links to apps I support): http://JayReynoldsFreeman.com/My/Software.html Sorry for the inconvenience. -- Jay Reynolds Freeman --------------------- Jay_Reynolds_Freeman@mac.com http://JayReynoldsFreeman.com (personal web site) ...

Wraith Scheme 2.15 released, also Pixie Schemes ...
Today I released version 2.15 of Wraith Scheme and version 1.02 of Pixie Scheme II. Today also, version 1.01 of Pixie Scheme III was released to the App Store. Wraith Scheme 2.15 is a shareware and open-source full R5 Scheme implementation for the Apple Macintosh, with enhancements for parallel processing, by which I mean multiple copies of the Wraith Scheme application (separate Unix processes) all running at once, sharing Scheme main memory. Wraith Scheme 2.15 is a full 64-bit Macintosh application, that only runs on Macintoshes with Intel processors that can execute 64-bit code, and that are running at least MacOS 10.6 (Snow Leopard). Wraith Scheme 2.15 contains enhancements that provide a number of pushbuttons, sliders, sense switches, and level indicators, for user-programmable input/output. Pixie Scheme II 1.02 is a shareware and open-source Scheme implementation for the Apple Macintosh, which is almost R5: It is in great part a design prototype for a possible iPad implementation of Scheme, and since the iPad generally hides its underlying Unix file system from users, Pixie Scheme II does not have any of the R5 procedures for access to files. Pixie Scheme II does have many of the enhancements that Wraith Scheme has. Pixie Scheme II has a rather different graphical user interface than does Wraith Scheme, which is both more iPad-like and more like the graphical user interface of the original Pixie Scheme, more than twenty years ago. I think it is rather cute. Pix...

"The Scheme Programming Language", 3rd ed.
I'm thinking of buying Dybvig's TSPL, 3rd edition. Before doing so I want to confirm this edition is based on R5RS. I would expect that to be the case based on the publication date, but the book's page at MIT press mentions only the "revised report" without saying if it is R5 or R4 (like the second edition.) Thanks, Roberto Waltman [ Please reply to the group, return address is invalid ] Roberto Waltman wrote: > I'm thinking of buying Dybvig's TSPL, 3rd edition. > Before doing so I want to confirm this edition is based on R5RS. > I would expect that to be the case based on the publication date, but > the book's page at MIT press mentions only the "revised report" > without saying if it is R5 or R4 (like the second edition.) The book is based on R5RS and is freely available on the net at: http://www.scheme.com/tspl3 You can look before you buy. Aziz,,, Abdulaziz Ghuloum wrote: >The book is based on R5RS and is freely available on the net at: > http://www.scheme.com/tspl3 Thank you, Roberto Waltman [ Please reply to the group, return address is invalid ] ...

References about multiple values in Scheme
In a future episode of my Adventures (http://www.artima.com/weblogs/ index.jsp?blogger=micheles) I am going to talk about multiple values. I am very much against them and I will certainly write any kind of bad things against them, but for sake of fairness I would like to add a few references about their introduction in the Scheme standard, the corresponding discussion, the arguments pro and against, etc. However I am totally ignorant of the relevant references, since multiple values were introduced so long ago. A quick search on c.l.s. finds a few posts (for instance this one http://groups.google.com/group/comp.lang.scheme/msg/7335da47820deff4?hl=en) but I would like some more "official" reference than a newsgroup post. Thanks for your help, Michele Simionato On Feb 11, 11:41=A0pm, Michele Simionato <michele.simion...@gmail.com> wrote: > I am going to talk about multiple values. I am very much against them Why? On Feb 12, 6:47=A0am, Grant Rettke <gret...@gmail.com> wrote: > On Feb 11, 11:41=A0pm, Michele Simionato <michele.simion...@gmail.com> > wrote: > > > I am going to talk about multiple values. I am very much against them > > Why? For the usual reasons, look for instance at the post by Jeffrey Siskind I referenced: http://groups.google.com/group/comp.lang.scheme/msg/7= 335da47820deff4?hl=3Den Notice that I do not want to beat a dead horse here, I am just asking for references. Michele Simionato <...

Web resources about - no value in Scheme - comp.lang.scheme

High-resolution scheme - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Harten, A. (1983), High Resolution Schemes for Hyperbolic Conservation Laws. J. Comput. Phys ., 49 :357–393. Hirsch, C. (1990), Numerical Computation ...

Turnbull government accused of ineptitude as refugee visa scheme stumbles
One of the few paths to a life in Australia for asylum seekers appears to have been blocked amid claims the federal government has approved just ...

Turnbull government accused of ineptitude as refugee visa scheme stumbles
One of the few paths to a life in Australia for asylum seekers appears to have been blocked amid claims the federal government has approved just ...

Government may act as Grattan Institute urges reining in of 'overly generous' student loans scheme
Forcing higher education&nbsp;graduates to pay back their debts sooner would rake in half a billion dollars a year, easing the pressure on the ...

Government may act as Grattan Institute urges reining in of 'overly generous' student loans scheme
Forcing higher education graduates to pay back their debts sooner would rake in half a billion dollars a year, easing the pressure on the federal ...

High-Flying Harvard Law Grad Charged With $95 Million Fraud Scheme
His family has quite the thing for Harvard Law: his father and three brothers are all HLS alums.

Apple iPad scheme seeks to reclaim the tablet market and win the post-PC wars
Something surely seems missing from this week's Apple Event. A year ago this month, Apple introduced the svelte, 12-inch MacBook . That makes ...

MOST TRANSPARENT, EVAH! Obama EPA Used Secret Email Accounts to Scheme with Lobbyists and Climatards
By Ethan Barton There is new evidence senior Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) officials routinely use private email accounts to conduct ...

NY man arrested in alleged fraud scheme
Prosecutors allege the financial services firm partner engaged in a $95 million scheme to defraud investors.

Kentucky's AG sues Volkswagen for emissions-rigging scheme
... Ky. (AP) — Kentucky Attorney General Andy Beshear sued Volkswagen on Tuesday, claiming the German automaker's diesel emissions cheating scheme ...

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