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Testing compatible cartridges in a Canon IP4200

I have recently purchased in the UK a new Canon IP4200 printer complete with 
the boxed and sealed OEM catridges and Print Head. Purchase price was less 
than the cost of a set of OEM cartridges.  I intend to use compatible 
cartridges with this printer. I have obtained a set of compatible cartridges 
(unbranded on eBay) and so far have soursed a Black (PGI) and Yellow empty 
OEM catridges complete with chips. I would like to be able to test the use 
of the compatible cartridges and if they are satisfactory continue to use 
them for general printing but retaining the partly used OEM cartridges for 
"special" prints if there proves to be any advantage in this. I would 
welcome comments on the practicality of this approach. Questions which come 
to mind are whether it is a) reasonable to do so and b) what is the best 
method of sealing  partly used cartridges whilst they are not installed in 
the printer, and whether it reasonable to store partly used cartridges for 
some time in this state?

Also, if I install a cartridge approximately how much printing do I need to 
do before I know that I am using the ink from that cartridge rather than 
from the previous one? I assume there will be a residue of ink in the 
"pipework" between the cartridge and the printhead?

Can anyone provide any links to user experiences of using non-OEM cartridges 
in either the IP4200 or other Canon printers using the chipped cartridge? 
There does seem to be a wealth of information on re-filling OEM carts but 
little on using "compatible" carts in these printers. I have scrolled 
through a large number of posts in this group and tried various search 
algorithms but have not found much user information. The compatible carts 
have been available for several months now so I would have expected some 
user experience to be available.
-- 
Colin Reddish




0
Colin
10/31/2006 10:51:27 PM
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"Colin Reddish" <pqr68_2@hotmail.com> wrote:
>I have recently purchased in the UK a new Canon IP4200 printer complete with 
>the boxed and sealed OEM catridges and Print Head. Purchase price was less 
>than the cost of a set of OEM cartridges.  I intend to use compatible 
>cartridges with this printer. I have obtained a set of compatible cartridges 
>(unbranded on eBay) and so far have soursed a Black (PGI) and Yellow empty 
>OEM catridges complete with chips. I would like to be able to test the use 
>of the compatible cartridges and if they are satisfactory continue to use 
>them for general printing but retaining the partly used OEM cartridges for 
>"special" prints if there proves to be any advantage in this. I would 
>welcome comments on the practicality of this approach. Questions which come 
>to mind are whether it is a) reasonable to do so and b) what is the best 
>method of sealing  partly used cartridges whilst they are not installed in 
>the printer, and whether it reasonable to store partly used cartridges for 
>some time in this state?
>
>Also, if I install a cartridge approximately how much printing do I need to 
>do before I know that I am using the ink from that cartridge rather than 
>from the previous one? I assume there will be a residue of ink in the 
>"pipework" between the cartridge and the printhead?
>
>Can anyone provide any links to user experiences of using non-OEM cartridges 
>in either the IP4200 or other Canon printers using the chipped cartridge? 
>There does seem to be a wealth of information on re-filling OEM carts but 
>little on using "compatible" carts in these printers. I have scrolled 
>through a large number of posts in this group and tried various search 
>algorithms but have not found much user information. The compatible carts 
>have been available for several months now so I would have expected some 
>user experience to be available.
>-- 
>Colin Reddish

Colin
Yes compatible cartridges have been available for some time but so far as I 
know there are no compatible chips yet. That means you have to transfer the 
chips from the old cartridges to the new and you will have an empty cartridge 
report which you can ignore and then you will lose monitoring of the ink 
levels. The same will apply to empty (pre-used) OEM cartridges.
Tony
0
Tony
11/1/2006 9:42:33 AM
On Tue, 31 Oct 2006 22:51:27 GMT, "Colin Reddish"
<pqr68_2@hotmail.com> wrote:

>I have recently purchased in the UK a new Canon IP4200 printer complete with 
>the boxed and sealed OEM catridges and Print Head. Purchase price was less 
>than the cost of a set of OEM cartridges.  I intend to use compatible 
>cartridges with this printer. I have obtained a set of compatible cartridges 
>(unbranded on eBay) and so far have soursed a Black (PGI) and Yellow empty 
>OEM catridges complete with chips. I would like to be able to test the use 
>of the compatible cartridges and if they are satisfactory continue to use 
>them for general printing but retaining the partly used OEM cartridges for 
>"special" prints if there proves to be any advantage in this. I would 
>welcome comments on the practicality of this approach. Questions which come 
>to mind are whether it is a) reasonable to do so and b) what is the best 
>method of sealing  partly used cartridges whilst they are not installed in 
>the printer, and whether it reasonable to store partly used cartridges for 
>some time in this state?
>
>Also, if I install a cartridge approximately how much printing do I need to 
>do before I know that I am using the ink from that cartridge rather than 
>from the previous one? I assume there will be a residue of ink in the 
>"pipework" between the cartridge and the printhead?
>
>Can anyone provide any links to user experiences of using non-OEM cartridges 
>in either the IP4200 or other Canon printers using the chipped cartridge? 
>There does seem to be a wealth of information on re-filling OEM carts but 
>little on using "compatible" carts in these printers. I have scrolled 
>through a large number of posts in this group and tried various search 
>algorithms but have not found much user information. The compatible carts 
>have been available for several months now so I would have expected some 
>user experience to be available.

Since the printer is so cheap why not buy another one and then use one
printer for your ordinary printing with refill ink and the other one
for your special prints.  I have a IP5000 for throw away work that I
refill and an IP4200 for photos.  The refill ink fades about 20 times
faster than the Canon ink.
0
george
11/1/2006 2:41:46 PM
"george" <abc@b.com> wrote in message 
news:6n3gk2tk4fa9d917188ch1r7uf9khg6fvd@4ax.com...

> Since the printer is so cheap why not buy another one and then use one
> printer for your ordinary printing with refill ink and the other one
> for your special prints.  I have a IP5000 for throw away work that I
> refill and an IP4200 for photos.  The refill ink fades about 20 times
> faster than the Canon ink.

What a great answer!! Why didn't I think of that? That gets me a full set of 
empty carts that I know have good chips for no wasted outlay. I was thinking 
of getting another printer to make use of the genuine carts but sell the 
print head hopefully for a reasonable sum on eBay and the rest of the 
surplus printer for spares, but you suggestion is much better, thanks.

I would still appreciate answers on the question of storing partly used 
carts and the using up ink already in the print head. This will be useful 
whilst I do some experimenting. Having the second printer as you suggest 
will be a fallback if I wreck one of them.
-- 
Colin Reddish 


0
Colin
11/1/2006 7:30:48 PM
"Tony" <TonytheTigurrrrr@aim.com> wrote in message 
news:part1of1.1.IPQPbO321NRhIw@ue.ph...

> Colin
> Yes compatible cartridges have been available for some time but so far as 
> I
> know there are no compatible chips yet. That means you have to transfer 
> the
> chips from the old cartridges to the new and you will have an empty 
> cartridge
> report which you can ignore and then you will lose monitoring of the ink
> levels. The same will apply to empty (pre-used) OEM cartridges.

Thanks Tony, I'm aware of those restrictions and am prepared to accept them. 
What surprises me is that there is so little detail of actual user 
experiences reported in the forums or on web sites.
-- 
Colin Reddish


0
Colin
11/1/2006 7:35:37 PM
On Wed, 01 Nov 2006 19:30:48 GMT, "Colin Reddish"
<pqr68_2@hotmail.com> wrote:


>I would still appreciate answers on the question of storing partly used 
>carts and the using up ink already in the print head. This will be useful 
>whilst I do some experimenting. Having the second printer as you suggest 
>will be a fallback if I wreck one of them.

To store partly used cartridges put the orange breakaway tab back on
the cartridge and hold in place with a rubber band.
0
george
11/2/2006 4:58:03 AM
george wrote:
> On Wed, 01 Nov 2006 19:30:48 GMT, "Colin Reddish"
> <pqr68_2@hotmail.com> wrote:
>
>
> >I would still appreciate answers on the question of storing partly used
> >carts and the using up ink already in the print head. This will be useful
> >whilst I do some experimenting. Having the second printer as you suggest
> >will be a fallback if I wreck one of them.
>
> To store partly used cartridges put the orange breakaway tab back on
> the cartridge and hold in place with a rubber band.

Or, I use blue masking tape my self... but that's only because I don't
stock rubberbands.

0
zakezuke
11/2/2006 7:03:42 AM
"zakezuke" <zakezuke_us@yahoo.com> wrote in message 
news:1162451022.244803.63770@i42g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
>
> george wrote:
>> On Wed, 01 Nov 2006 19:30:48 GMT, "Colin Reddish"
>> <pqr68_2@hotmail.com> wrote:
>>
>>
>> >I would still appreciate answers on the question of storing partly used
>> >carts and the using up ink already in the print head. This will be 
>> >useful
>> >whilst I do some experimenting. Having the second printer as you suggest
>> >will be a fallback if I wreck one of them.
>>
>> To store partly used cartridges put the orange breakaway tab back on
>> the cartridge and hold in place with a rubber band.
>
> Or, I use blue masking tape my self... but that's only because I don't
> stock rubberbands.

Thanks for the replies. I'll do that. Is it best to store them in their 
operational position i.e. with the outlet at the bottom? I have seen 
comments about using blotting paper to catch drips when removing temporary 
seals. This would be prevented if they were stored inverted. Maybe this 
would cause the sponge near the outlet to dry out?
-- 
Colin Reddish


0
Colin
11/2/2006 11:04:12 PM
"Colin Reddish" <pqr68_2@hotmail.com> wrote in message 
news:MPu2h.12111$p8.2774@newsfe3-win.ntli.net...
>
> "zakezuke" <zakezuke_us@yahoo.com> wrote in message 
> news:1162451022.244803.63770@i42g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
>>
>> george wrote:
>>> On Wed, 01 Nov 2006 19:30:48 GMT, "Colin Reddish"
>>> <pqr68_2@hotmail.com> wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>> >I would still appreciate answers on the question of storing partly used
>>> >carts and the using up ink already in the print head. This will be 
>>> >useful
>>> >whilst I do some experimenting. Having the second printer as you 
>>> >suggest
>>> >will be a fallback if I wreck one of them.
>>>
>>> To store partly used cartridges put the orange breakaway tab back on
>>> the cartridge and hold in place with a rubber band.
>>
>> Or, I use blue masking tape my self... but that's only because I don't
>> stock rubberbands.
>
> Thanks for the replies. I'll do that. Is it best to store them in their 
> operational position i.e. with the outlet at the bottom? I have seen 
> comments about using blotting paper to catch drips when removing temporary 
> seals. This would be prevented if they were stored inverted. Maybe this 
> would cause the sponge near the outlet to dry out?
> -- 
> Colin Reddish
>
>

I think that right-side up would be best as the cart, when installed again, 
has to have a wet exit port filter.  About the masking tape - Zakezuke is an 
excellent source of information, but I've had problems with the regular 
masking tape getting soggy after a while.  I was storing them in a sealed 
refrigerator carton after rubber banding the outlet port cover back on as a 
seal at the bottom and using masking tape over the air vent.  I switched to 
a good quality black plastic electricians tape and like it better to seal 
the air vent. 


0
Burt
11/2/2006 11:24:50 PM
Colin Reddish wrote:
> "zakezuke" <zakezuke_us@yahoo.com> wrote in message
> >> To store partly used cartridges put the orange breakaway tab back on
> >> the cartridge and hold in place with a rubber band.
> >
> > Or, I use blue masking tape my self... but that's only because I don't
> > stock rubberbands.
>
> Thanks for the replies. I'll do that. Is it best to store them in their
> operational position i.e. with the outlet at the bottom? I have seen
> comments about using blotting paper to catch drips when removing temporary
> seals. This would be prevented if they were stored inverted. Maybe this
> would cause the sponge near the outlet to dry out?

Upside down would not be wise.  I lack the experence base of others but
proper operation would seem to depend on having the foam not quite 100%
saturated.  I've noticed if the cotton wod gets 100% full it restricts
the flow of ink out the outlet.  Upside down would cause the ink to
flow to the top of the cotton wod.  Not to speak of the fact there is a
hole there under the label.

Storing upright is from my limited experence base, the way to go.  The
same would go with OEM.

0
zakezuke
11/3/2006 12:43:49 PM
"zakezuke" <zakezuke_us@yahoo.com> wrote in message 
news:1162557829.150859.226450@e3g2000cwe.googlegroups.com...

> Storing upright is from my limited experence base, the way to go.  The
> same would go with OEM.

Thanks for the replies.
-- 
Colin Reddish


0
Colin
11/3/2006 1:50:34 PM
Colin Reddish wrote:
> "Tony" <TonytheTigurrrrr@aim.com> wrote in message 
> news:part1of1.1.IPQPbO321NRhIw@ue.ph...
> 
>> Colin
>> Yes compatible cartridges have been available for some time but so far as 
>> I
>> know there are no compatible chips yet. That means you have to transfer 
>> the
>> chips from the old cartridges to the new and you will have an empty 
>> cartridge
>> report which you can ignore and then you will lose monitoring of the ink
>> levels. The same will apply to empty (pre-used) OEM cartridges.
> 
> Thanks Tony, I'm aware of those restrictions and am prepared to accept them. 
> What surprises me is that there is so little detail of actual user 
> experiences reported in the forums or on web sites.

Bit late in the day but just to note... I think one of the reasons 
you've not seen too much on this is that most people with a clue have 
eskewed the newer canons because of the chips. Those who have gone that 
route have often had the experience to know that refilling is cheapest 
of all and just refilled the original carts.

The compatibles are there but I doubt many people have touched them and 
from what I've seen on the rare forum posts that do mention them, they 
are a little prone to failure and chips being unrecognised.

My advice if you actually opt for that route is to go for refilling and 
use nifty-stuff forum as a good base for learning the ropes.

Hope that helps.

Martin
0
Martin
11/7/2006 12:00:30 PM
"Martin" <ng@websnail.net> wrote in message 
news:ac6dnSbrgqcN6M3YRVnytw@pipex.net...
> Colin Reddish wrote:
>> "Tony" <TonytheTigurrrrr@aim.com> wrote in message 
>> news:part1of1.1.IPQPbO321NRhIw@ue.ph...
>>
>>> Colin
>>> Yes compatible cartridges have been available for some time but so far 
>>> as I
>>> know there are no compatible chips yet. That means you have to transfer 
>>> the
>>> chips from the old cartridges to the new and you will have an empty 
>>> cartridge
>>> report which you can ignore and then you will lose monitoring of the ink
>>> levels. The same will apply to empty (pre-used) OEM cartridges.
>>
>> Thanks Tony, I'm aware of those restrictions and am prepared to accept 
>> them. What surprises me is that there is so little detail of actual user 
>> experiences reported in the forums or on web sites.
>
> Bit late in the day but just to note... I think one of the reasons you've 
> not seen too much on this is that most people with a clue have eskewed the 
> newer canons because of the chips. Those who have gone that route have 
> often had the experience to know that refilling is cheapest of all and 
> just refilled the original carts.
>
> The compatibles are there but I doubt many people have touched them and 
> from what I've seen on the rare forum posts that do mention them, they are 
> a little prone to failure and chips being unrecognised.
>
> My advice if you actually opt for that route is to go for refilling and 
> use nifty-stuff forum as a good base for learning the ropes.
>
> Hope that helps.
>
> Martin

To reinforce Martin's advice, there are several people posting to the 
nifty-stuff forum about their experience with the newest Canon printers.
http://www.nifty-stuff.com/forum/


0
Burt
11/7/2006 5:57:12 PM
"Burt" <sfbjgNOSPAM@pacbell.net> wrote in message 
news:YN34h.23596$TV3.10515@newssvr21.news.prodigy.com...
> "Martin" <ng@websnail.net> wrote in message

>> Bit late in the day but just to note... I think one of the reasons you've 
>> not seen too much on this is that most people with a clue have eskewed 
>> the newer canons because of the chips. Those who have gone that route 
>> have often had the experience to know that refilling is cheapest of all 
>> and just refilled the original carts.
>>
>> The compatibles are there but I doubt many people have touched them and 
>> from what I've seen on the rare forum posts that do mention them, they 
>> are a little prone to failure and chips being unrecognised.
>>
>> My advice if you actually opt for that route is to go for refilling and 
>> use nifty-stuff forum as a good base for learning the ropes.
>>
>> Hope that helps.
>>
>> Martin
>
> To reinforce Martin's advice, there are several people posting to the 
> nifty-stuff forum about their experience with the newest Canon printers.
> http://www.nifty-stuff.com/forum/

Thanks Burt and Martin. I've noted your advice and am currently following 
relevant threads in the nifty-stuff forum. Like on here there is little 
experience of compatibles for the chipped Canon printers. In recent weeks 
several of the more reputable UK suppliers have introduced compatible carts 
for the 4200/5200 printers so they probably believe there is a market for 
them. So maybe more users will be trying them and reporting results. I have 
purchased a set on eBay but not installed them yet. The OEM carts supplied 
with the printer which I purchased a couple of weeks ago are still almost 
full so I will take my time getting to know the printer using them and being 
convinced the printer does not have any faults before I sacrifice the 
warranty by using the compatibles. I have also bought some empty OEM carts 
from which I will use the chips. I have also been reading about re-filling 
as an alternative approach but at the present time I'd rather stick with 
compatibles if they work out OK. There are also a significant number of 
IP4200's being sold on eBay and they are fetching reasonable prices 
(�30-�50) although much less than the IP4000's which tend to be twice that. 
I suspect many of the buyers of the 4200 are un-aware of the significance of 
the chipped cartridges.
-- 
Colin Reddish


0
Colin
11/12/2006 1:14:21 PM
Colin Reddish wrote:
> The OEM carts supplied
> with the printer which I purchased a couple of weeks ago are still almost
> full so I will take my time getting to know the printer using them and being
> convinced the printer does not have any faults before I sacrifice the
> warranty by using the compatibles.

While use of compatibles in it self does not void the warranty, your
logic is sound.  See how it works out of the box before you make a
change to your operating procedure.  Use the OEM ink as a point of
reference, then judge all others based on that.  I do the exact same
thing... though others would be tempted to sell off the OEM ink and
save $40 to $50 on that printer purchace.. or 30 to 35quid.

Either way it's your printer, your choice.

0
zakezuke
11/12/2006 6:48:45 PM
"Colin Reddish" <pqr68_2@hotmail.com> wrote in message 
news:N6F5h.11577$Xh3.2273@newsfe6-win.ntli.net...
>
> "Burt" <sfbjgNOSPAM@pacbell.net> wrote in message 
> news:YN34h.23596$TV3.10515@newssvr21.news.prodigy.com...
>> "Martin" <ng@websnail.net> wrote in message
>
>>> Bit late in the day but just to note... I think one of the reasons 
>>> you've not seen too much on this is that most people with a clue have 
>>> eskewed the newer canons because of the chips. Those who have gone that 
>>> route have often had the experience to know that refilling is cheapest 
>>> of all and just refilled the original carts.
>>>
>>> The compatibles are there but I doubt many people have touched them and 
>>> from what I've seen on the rare forum posts that do mention them, they 
>>> are a little prone to failure and chips being unrecognised.
>>>
>>> My advice if you actually opt for that route is to go for refilling and 
>>> use nifty-stuff forum as a good base for learning the ropes.
>>>
>>> Hope that helps.
>>>
>>> Martin
>>
>> To reinforce Martin's advice, there are several people posting to the 
>> nifty-stuff forum about their experience with the newest Canon printers.
>> http://www.nifty-stuff.com/forum/
>
> Thanks Burt and Martin. I've noted your advice and am currently following 
> relevant threads in the nifty-stuff forum. Like on here there is little 
> experience of compatibles for the chipped Canon printers. In recent weeks 
> several of the more reputable UK suppliers have introduced compatible 
> carts for the 4200/5200 printers so they probably believe there is a 
> market for them. So maybe more users will be trying them and reporting 
> results. I have purchased a set on eBay but not installed them yet. The 
> OEM carts supplied with the printer which I purchased a couple of weeks 
> ago are still almost full so I will take my time getting to know the 
> printer using them and being convinced the printer does not have any 
> faults before I sacrifice the warranty by using the compatibles. I have 
> also bought some empty OEM carts from which I will use the chips. I have 
> also been reading about re-filling as an alternative approach but at the 
> present time I'd rather stick with compatibles if they work out OK. There 
> are also a significant number of IP4200's being sold on eBay and they are 
> fetching reasonable prices (�30-�50) although much less than the IP4000's 
> which tend to be twice that. I suspect many of the buyers of the 4200 are 
> un-aware of the significance of the chipped cartridges.
> -- 
> Colin Reddish
>
>
Colin - the Canon OEM carts in the ip4200 are easily adapted for refilling. 
After several refills they don't feed the ink as well, and they can then be 
flushed out with a simple device made from a few hardware store items and 
restored to like-new function.  All this information is on the nifty-stuff 
forum.  Refilling gives you the opportunity to buy inks that are more 
predictable than with prefilled compatable carts.  There are just a few that 
you will see noted on this and the nifty forum that anyone recommends.  Once 
you learn the refilling routine it is really simple to do. 


0
Burt
11/12/2006 7:55:38 PM
Colin Reddish wrote:

> The OEM carts supplied 
> with the printer which I purchased a couple of weeks ago are still almost 
> full so I will take my time getting to know the printer using them and being 
> convinced the printer does not have any faults before I sacrifice the 
> warranty by using the compatibles.

I still have the full original OEM carts for my iP5000 bought in
December 2004. They're about two years old now so I guess I should use
them out before they lose their flavor. :-) I never bothered registering
the printer and went straight to using a mixture of compatibles and home
refill for the BCI-3e black. Then some months later I went to full
refill, and I'm still at it. Printer works flawlessly with various
aftermarket inks. And why not? No surprise there. My biggest worry was
mechanical breakdown and NOT anything related to the inks. So far so
good with the mechanics and the limited life span printheads they give 
us for a laugh and then charge more than 1/2 the price of a new printer
to replace when burnt out!

-Taliesyn
0
Taliesyn
11/13/2006 2:38:13 AM
On Sun, 12 Nov 2006 21:38:13 -0500, Taliesyn <taliesyn4@netscape.net>
wrote:

>Colin Reddish wrote:
>
>> The OEM carts supplied 
>> with the printer which I purchased a couple of weeks ago are still almost 
>> full so I will take my time getting to know the printer using them and being 
>> convinced the printer does not have any faults before I sacrifice the 
>> warranty by using the compatibles.
>
>I still have the full original OEM carts for my iP5000 bought in
>December 2004. They're about two years old now so I guess I should use
>them out before they lose their flavor. :-) I never bothered registering
>the printer and went straight to using a mixture of compatibles and home
>refill for the BCI-3e black. Then some months later I went to full
>refill, and I'm still at it. Printer works flawlessly with various
>aftermarket inks. And why not? No surprise there. My biggest worry was
>mechanical breakdown and NOT anything related to the inks. So far so
>good with the mechanics and the limited life span printheads they give 
>us for a laugh and then charge more than 1/2 the price of a new printer
>to replace when burnt out!
>
>-Taliesyn


Just a personal observation, to partially support the comments above.
My Canon i950 is considerably older than the one discussed here, and I
refilled the original cartridges many, many times before the print
head finally failed.  My best estimate is between 2000 and 3000 full
color 8X10 photographs before this failure occurred.  And I bought a
brand new, sealed print head off eBay for about $80 US, and with it
and a new set of OEM cartridges, I'm back running fine again.  Also,
refilling as often as needed, no problems there either.  My original
cost of that printer was about $250 as I recall, so my new printhead
cost only about 1/3 original printer.  Furthermore, I don't have to
put up with the current "monopolistic" chipping behavior of those
money grubbing jerks!

Olin
0
omcdaniel
11/13/2006 4:46:19 PM
Taliesyn wrote:
> Colin Reddish wrote:
> 
>> The OEM carts supplied with the printer which I purchased a couple of 
>> weeks ago are still almost full so I will take my time getting to know 
>> the printer using them and being convinced the printer does not have 
>> any faults before I sacrifice the warranty by using the compatibles.
> 
> I still have the full original OEM carts for my iP5000 bought in
> December 2004. They're about two years old now so I guess I should use
> them out before they lose their flavor. :-) I never bothered registering
> the printer and went straight to using a mixture of compatibles and home
> refill for the BCI-3e black. Then some months later I went to full
> refill, and I'm still at it. Printer works flawlessly with various
> aftermarket inks. And why not? No surprise there. My biggest worry was
> mechanical breakdown and NOT anything related to the inks. So far so
> good with the mechanics and the limited life span printheads they give 
> us for a laugh and then charge more than 1/2 the price of a new printer
> to replace when burnt out!

Hey, Canon has to make their money someplace if we're not buying OEM 
ink. ;)  The cost of a print head for the iP4000/MP780 is still less 
than the cost of a set of OEM cartridges.  I'll be using our non-chipped 
Canon printers until their wheels fall off.  Even then, I have a big 
roll of duct tape and bailing wire sitting on the shelf to patch them up 
again.
0
Michael
11/13/2006 5:02:44 PM
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Colin Reddish wrote:
<blockquote cite="midN6F5h.11577$Xh3.2273@newsfe6-win.ntli.net"
 type="cite">
  <pre wrap="">"Burt" <a class="moz-txt-link-rfc2396E" href="mailto:sfbjgNOSPAM@pacbell.net">&lt;sfbjgNOSPAM@pacbell.net&gt;</a> wrote in message 
<a class="moz-txt-link-freetext" href="news:YN34h.23596$TV3.10515@newssvr21.news.prodigy.com">news:YN34h.23596$TV3.10515@newssvr21.news.prodigy.com</a>...
  </pre>
  <blockquote type="cite">
    <pre wrap="">"Martin" <a class="moz-txt-link-rfc2396E" href="mailto:ng@websnail.net">&lt;ng@websnail.net&gt;</a> wrote in message
    </pre>
  </blockquote>
  <pre wrap=""><!---->
  </pre>
  <blockquote type="cite">
    <blockquote type="cite">
      <pre wrap="">Bit late in the day but just to note... I think one of the reasons you've 
not seen too much on this is that most people with a clue have eskewed 
the newer canons because of the chips. Those who have gone that route 
have often had the experience to know that refilling is cheapest of all 
and just refilled the original carts.

The compatibles are there but I doubt many people have touched them and 
from what I've seen on the rare forum posts that do mention them, they 
are a little prone to failure and chips being unrecognised.

My advice if you actually opt for that route is to go for refilling and 
use nifty-stuff forum as a good base for learning the ropes.

Hope that helps.

Martin
      </pre>
    </blockquote>
    <pre wrap="">To reinforce Martin's advice, there are several people posting to the 
nifty-stuff forum about their experience with the newest Canon printers.
<a class="moz-txt-link-freetext" href="http://www.nifty-stuff.com/forum/">http://www.nifty-stuff.com/forum/</a>
    </pre>
  </blockquote>
</blockquote>
<br>
This is a predudicial forum of hackers and hobbyists who (many) have
some type of affiliation with the relabelers in the generic ink
industy.&nbsp; If you want the truth by independent professionals like
Wilhelm Labs, PC World and PC Magazine as well as Popular Photography I
would google then and read professional reviews.<br>
<blockquote cite="midN6F5h.11577$Xh3.2273@newsfe6-win.ntli.net"
 type="cite">
  <pre wrap=""><!---->
Thanks Burt and Martin. I've noted your advice and am currently following 
relevant threads in the nifty-stuff forum. Like on here there is little 
experience of compatibles for the chipped Canon printers. In recent weeks 
several of the more reputable UK suppliers have introduced compatible carts 
for the 4200/5200 printers so they probably believe there is a market for 
them. So maybe more users will be trying them and reporting results. I have 
purchased a set on eBay but not installed them yet. The OEM carts supplied 
with the printer which I purchased a couple of weeks ago are still almost 
full so I will take my time getting to know the printer using them and being 
convinced the printer does not have any faults before I sacrifice the 
warranty by using the compatibles. I have also bought some empty OEM carts 
from which I will use the chips. I have also been reading about re-filling 
as an alternative approach but at the present time I'd rather stick with 
compatibles if they work out OK. There are also a significant number of 
IP4200's being sold on eBay and they are fetching reasonable prices 
(&pound;30-&pound;50) although much less than the IP4000's which tend to be twice that. 
I suspect many of the buyers of the 4200 are un-aware of the significance of 
the chipped cartridges.
  </pre>
</blockquote>
</body>
</html>
0
measekite
11/16/2006 2:31:26 AM

Taliesyn wrote:
> Colin Reddish wrote:
>
>> The OEM carts supplied with the printer which I purchased a couple of 
>> weeks ago are still almost full so I will take my time getting to 
>> know the printer using them and being convinced the printer does not 
>> have any faults before I sacrifice the warranty by using the 
>> compatibles.
>
> I still have the full original OEM carts for my iP5000 bought in
> December 2004. They're about two years old now so I guess I should use
> them out before they lose their flavor. :-) I never bothered registering
> the printer and went straight to using a mixture of compatibles and home
> refill for the BCI-3e black. Then some months later I went to full
> refill, and I'm still at it. Printer works flawlessly with various
> aftermarket inks. And why not? No surprise there. My biggest worry was
> mechanical breakdown and NOT anything related to the inks. So far so
> good with the mechanics and the limited life span printheads they give 
> us for a laugh and then charge more than 1/2 the price of a new printer
> to replace when burnt out!
>
> -Taliesyn

I find that this boy's information is not reliable and I just do not 
believe his claims.  All of his claims conflict with adult professionals 
who I favor to believe due to their professional credibility.  One is 
Wilhem who makes hundreds of thousands of dollars.  This person has to 
save lunch money to buy generic ink.
0
measekite
11/16/2006 2:39:15 AM

Michael Johnson, PE wrote:
> Taliesyn wrote:
>> Colin Reddish wrote:
>>
>>> The OEM carts supplied with the printer which I purchased a couple 
>>> of weeks ago are still almost full so I will take my time getting to 
>>> know the printer using them and being convinced the printer does not 
>>> have any faults before I sacrifice the warranty by using the 
>>> compatibles.
>>
>> I still have the full original OEM carts for my iP5000 bought in
>> December 2004. They're about two years old now so I guess I should use
>> them out before they lose their flavor. :-) I never bothered registering
>> the printer and went straight to using a mixture of compatibles and home
>> refill for the BCI-3e black. Then some months later I went to full
>> refill, and I'm still at it. Printer works flawlessly with various
>> aftermarket inks. And why not? No surprise there. My biggest worry was
>> mechanical breakdown and NOT anything related to the inks. So far so
>> good with the mechanics and the limited life span printheads they 
>> give us for a laugh and then charge more than 1/2 the price of a new 
>> printer
>> to replace when burnt out!
>
> Hey, Canon has to make their money someplace if we're not buying OEM 
> ink. ;)  The cost of a print head for the iP4000/MP780 is still less 
> than the cost of a set of OEM cartridges.  I'll be using our 
> non-chipped Canon printers until their wheels fall off.  Even then, I 
> have a big roll of duct tape and bailing wire sitting on the shelf to 
> patch them up again.

What a joke and a very bad deal ($80.00) for a printhead.  I can get a 
brand new printer, an IP4300 that uses the latest Canon ink technology 
that also includes a full set of OEM inks that a more fade resistant 
than the previous set.  I still am not sure if the quality is any better.
0
measekite
11/16/2006 2:44:51 AM
measekite <inkystinky@oem.com> wrote in news:nbQ6h.6639$Sw1.5500
@newssvr13.news.prodigy.com:

> 
> 
> Taliesyn wrote:
>> Colin Reddish wrote:
>>
>>> The OEM carts supplied with the printer which I purchased a couple of 
>>> weeks ago are still almost full so I will take my time getting to 
>>> know the printer using them and being convinced the printer does not 
>>> have any faults before I sacrifice the warranty by using the 
>>> compatibles.
>>
>> I still have the full original OEM carts for my iP5000 bought in
>> December 2004. They're about two years old now so I guess I should use
>> them out before they lose their flavor. :-) I never bothered 
registering
>> the printer and went straight to using a mixture of compatibles and 
home
>> refill for the BCI-3e black. Then some months later I went to full
>> refill, and I'm still at it. Printer works flawlessly with various
>> aftermarket inks. And why not? No surprise there. My biggest worry was
>> mechanical breakdown and NOT anything related to the inks. So far so
>> good with the mechanics and the limited life span printheads they give 
>> us for a laugh and then charge more than 1/2 the price of a new 
printer
>> to replace when burnt out!
>>
>> -Taliesyn
> 
> I find that this boy's information is not reliable and I just do not 
> believe his claims.  All of his claims conflict with adult 
> professionals who I favor to believe due to their professional
> credibility.  One is Wilhem who makes hundreds of thousands of dollars.

Money from who, Canon, HP and Epson, Tartaglia?  What else would you 
expect for tests paying "hundreds of thousands of dollars".

-- 
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com

0
Who
11/16/2006 3:07:07 PM
Who Cares wrote:

> measekite <inkystinky@oem.com> wrote in news:nbQ6h.6639$Sw1.5500
> @newssvr13.news.prodigy.com:

>>
>>I find that this boy's information is not reliable and I just do not 
>>believe his claims.  All of his claims conflict with adult 
>>professionals who I favor to believe due to their professional
>>credibility.  One is Wilhem who makes hundreds of thousands of dollars.
> 
> 
> Money from who, Canon, HP and Epson, Tartaglia?  What else would you 
> expect for tests paying "hundreds of thousands of dollars".
> 

Observe the insane bullshit of meashershithead. He refers to the op as 
"boy" and his references as "adult professionals". When in reality he 
himself is a "fool". Observe this "professional" tester wilhem. He makes 
  "hundreds of thousands of dollars" so we have to believe his results 
right?
Bullshit! He is paid by the majors to test their ink against selected 
inferior inks so that the majors can use the "test results" in their 
advertising claims.
Kill file this moron.
Frank
0
Frank
11/16/2006 5:12:49 PM
measekite wrote:

> I find that this boy's information is not reliable and I just do not
> believe his claims.  All of his claims conflict with adult professionals
> who I favor to believe due to their professional credibility.  One is
> Wilhem who makes hundreds of thousands of dollars.  This person has to
> save lunch money to buy generic ink.

The savings of bulk ink, as measekite pointed out in the past, equal
one pizza a week and sending your kid to prom, in a limo, with a tux
rental.  The savings for moderate users can make the difference between
buying a Kia or a Toyota, a Toyota or a Suburu.

0
zakezuke
11/16/2006 7:13:50 PM
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN">
<html>
<head>
  <meta content="text/html;charset=ISO-8859-1" http-equiv="Content-Type">
  <title></title>
</head>
<body bgcolor="#ffffff" text="#000000">
<br>
<br>
zakezuke wrote:
<blockquote
 cite="mid1163704430.549808.163060@b28g2000cwb.googlegroups.com"
 type="cite">
  <pre wrap="">measekite wrote:

  </pre>
  <blockquote type="cite">
    <pre wrap="">I find that this boy's information is not reliable and I just do not
believe his claims.  All of his claims conflict with adult professionals
who I favor to believe due to their professional credibility.  One is
Wilhem who makes hundreds of thousands of dollars.  This person has to
save lunch money to buy generic ink.
    </pre>
  </blockquote>
  <pre wrap=""><!---->
The savings of bulk ink, as measekite pointed out in the past, equal
one pizza a week and sending your kid to prom, in a limo, with a tux
rental.  The savings for moderate users can make the difference between
buying a Kia or a Toyota, a Toyota or a Suburu.
  </pre>
</blockquote>
<br>
Those who would favor (not favour) generic ink would also favor a Yugo.<br>
</body>
</html>
0
measekite
11/16/2006 7:29:46 PM
zakezuke wrote:
> measekite wrote:
> 
> 
>>I find that this boy's information is not reliable and I just do not
>>believe his claims.  All of his claims conflict with adult professionals
>>who I favor to believe due to their professional credibility.  One is
>>Wilhem who makes hundreds of thousands of dollars.  This person has to
>>save lunch money to buy generic ink.
> 
> 
> The savings of bulk ink, as measekite pointed out in the past, equal
> one pizza a week and sending your kid to prom, in a limo, with a tux
> rental.  The savings for moderate users can make the difference between
> buying a Kia or a Toyota, a Toyota or a Suburu.
> 

For anyone who prints a lot, several thousand can be saved by using
aftermarke/refill inks. In 10 years that could mean the difference
between someone ending up with a Yugo (like Measekite is forced to drive 
because ink costs so much :-)) or me, getting the Camry simply from the
money I saved with aftermarket ink. Obviously, this is only realized if 
one prints an awful lot. For someone who prints only a couple of sets of 
cartridges a year, well, keep driving that bike you got from the money 
you saved not buying OEMs and dream of printing more . . .

-Taliesyn
0
Taliesyn
11/16/2006 7:54:20 PM
measekite wrote:

> The savings of bulk ink, as measekite pointed out in the past, equal
> one pizza a week and sending your kid to prom, in a limo, with a tux
> rental.  The savings for moderate users can make the difference between
> buying a Kia or a Toyota, a Toyota or a Suburu.
>
>
>  Those who would favor (not favour) generic ink would also favor a Yugo.

Not really.  The people who I know personaly who use nissans drive
Nissans, Toyotas, Hondas, Suburus, and SUV hybrids.

I only know of one Yugo driver, and I don't know him personaly.

0
zakezuke
11/16/2006 10:34:43 PM
zakezuke wrote:

> measekite wrote:
> 
> 
>>The savings of bulk ink, as measekite pointed out in the past, equal
>>one pizza a week and sending your kid to prom, in a limo, with a tux
>>rental.  The savings for moderate users can make the difference between
>>buying a Kia or a Toyota, a Toyota or a Suburu.
>>
>>
>> Those who would favor (not favour) generic ink would also favor a Yugo.
> 
> 
> Not really.  The people who I know personaly who use nissans drive
> Nissans, Toyotas, Hondas, Suburus, and SUV hybrids.
> 
> I only know of one Yugo driver, and I don't know him personaly.
> 
I see that jackass meashershithead is at it again. Yugo's died out 
decades ago while the after market ink sector is growing by leaps and 
bounds. It's highly unlikely that, much to the dismay of oem's (and our 
resident troll), that they will disappear like the Yugo did.
Frank
0
Frank
11/16/2006 11:21:52 PM

Taliesyn wrote:
> zakezuke wrote:
>> measekite wrote:
>>
>>
>>> I find that this boy's information is not reliable and I just do not
>>> believe his claims.  All of his claims conflict with adult 
>>> professionals
>>> who I favor to believe due to their professional credibility.  One is
>>> Wilhem who makes hundreds of thousands of dollars.  This person has to
>>> save lunch money to buy generic ink.
>>
>>
>> The savings of bulk ink, as measekite pointed out in the past, equal
>> one pizza a week and sending your kid to prom, in a limo, with a tux
>> rental.  The savings for moderate users can make the difference between
>> buying a Kia or a Toyota, a Toyota or a Suburu.
>>
>
> For anyone who prints a lot, several thousand can be saved by using
> aftermarke/refill inks. In 10 years that could mean the difference
> between someone ending up with a Yugo (like Measekite is forced to 
> drive because ink costs so much :-))

You are not even old enough to drive.  Also you cannot even get into a 
bar (legally).  I do not beleive you even spend that much,  You have no 
job and I am sure your allowance is not that bit.

Of course the money you get from mowing grass and shoveling (?snow) has 
to go far.
> or me, getting the Camry simply from the
> money I saved with aftermarket ink. 

I doubt you could afford to spend $30,000 on a Camry.  A real joke.
> Obviously, this is only realized if one prints an awful lot. For 
> someone who prints only a couple of sets of cartridges a year, well, 
> keep driving that bike you got from the money you saved not buying 
> OEMs and dream of printing more . . .
>

The intelligence here is to buy an inket printer and use it a lot using 
generic ink and some cheap paper and walla now you can afford a car. :-[ 
:-D :-D
> -Taliesyn
0
measekite
11/17/2006 5:38:31 PM
measekite wrote:

> Of course the money you get from mowing grass and shoveling (?snow) has
> to go far.
> > or me, getting the Camry simply from the
> > money I saved with aftermarket ink.
>
> I doubt you could afford to spend $30,000 on a Camry.  A real joke.

I've believe $30,000 canadian for a camry for the XLE.

MSRP US is about $20,000 for a base model.  XLE with a v6 $26,000 or
so, but more like $22,000 retail.


I'm not sure of the retail price of the Camry up north, but we're
talking $25,000 canadian for the LE, about $33,000 for the XLE with the
v6.

Assuming $15,000 and 1.8apr that's about $260/month for 60 months
Assuming $20,000 and 1.8APR that's about $350/month for 60 months.
Assuming $25,000 and 1.8apr that's about  $435/month for 60 months.
Assuming $30,000 and 1.8apr that's about  $525//month for 60 months

The difference between $5000 is about $90/month.  Given that ink is
costing there and abouts of $70 a set, and assuming someone is burning
a set of cartridges/month, and bulk ink costs there and abouts of 90%
less, you can easily see how that extra cash could easily jump you to
the next class of car, or at least the same car but nicely loaded.  We
are talking over $3500.00 in savings in 60 months.

0
zakezuke
11/18/2006 9:27:14 PM
zakezuke wrote:
> measekite wrote:
> 
> 
>>Of course the money you get from mowing grass and shoveling (?snow) has
>>to go far.
>>
>>>or me, getting the Camry simply from the
>>>money I saved with aftermarket ink.
>>
>>I doubt you could afford to spend $30,000 on a Camry.  A real joke.
> 
> 
> I've believe $30,000 canadian for a camry for the XLE.
> 
> MSRP US is about $20,000 for a base model.  XLE with a v6 $26,000 or
> so, but more like $22,000 retail.
> 
> 
> I'm not sure of the retail price of the Camry up north, but we're
> talking $25,000 canadian for the LE, about $33,000 for the XLE with the
> v6.
> 
> Assuming $15,000 and 1.8apr that's about $260/month for 60 months
> Assuming $20,000 and 1.8APR that's about $350/month for 60 months.
> Assuming $25,000 and 1.8apr that's about  $435/month for 60 months.
> Assuming $30,000 and 1.8apr that's about  $525//month for 60 months
> 
> The difference between $5000 is about $90/month.  Given that ink is
> costing there and abouts of $70 a set, and assuming someone is burning
> a set of cartridges/month, and bulk ink costs there and abouts of 90%
> less, you can easily see how that extra cash could easily jump you to
> the next class of car, or at least the same car but nicely loaded.  We
> are talking over $3500.00 in savings in 60 months.
> 

Nicely presented Z, although I seriously doubt meashershithead will 
understand the math.
THX
Frank
0
Frank
11/18/2006 9:56:16 PM
zakezuke wrote:

> measekite wrote:
> 
> 
>>Of course the money you get from mowing grass and shoveling (?snow) has
>>to go far.
>>
>>>or me, getting the Camry simply from the
>>>money I saved with aftermarket ink.
>>
>>I doubt you could afford to spend $30,000 on a Camry.  A real joke.
> 
> 
> I've believe $30,000 canadian for a camry for the XLE.
> 
> MSRP US is about $20,000 for a base model.  XLE with a v6 $26,000 or
> so, but more like $22,000 retail.
> 
> 
> I'm not sure of the retail price of the Camry up north, but we're
> talking $25,000 canadian for the LE, about $33,000 for the XLE with the
> v6.
> 
> Assuming $15,000 and 1.8apr that's about $260/month for 60 months
> Assuming $20,000 and 1.8APR that's about $350/month for 60 months.
> Assuming $25,000 and 1.8apr that's about  $435/month for 60 months.
> Assuming $30,000 and 1.8apr that's about  $525//month for 60 months
> 
> The difference between $5000 is about $90/month.  Given that ink is
> costing there and abouts of $70 a set, and assuming someone is burning
> a set of cartridges/month, and bulk ink costs there and abouts of 90%
> less, you can easily see how that extra cash could easily jump you to
> the next class of car, or at least the same car but nicely loaded.  We
> are talking over $3500.00 in savings in 60 months.
> 

I calculate I'll get that Camry by 2027 . . . .  ;-) (if not new, used!)

-Taliesyn
0
Taliesyn
11/19/2006 12:30:33 AM
Reply: