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Symmetricom/Datum NTP-Servers

Hello all,

This is an extension to my previous post regarding running NTP on a
Win 3.1.1 machine.

I am planning on getting the SyncServer S100 from Symmetricom as my
NTP server. My network does not have internet connections, so i plan
to use a GPS receiver which will be able to get the time from the GPS
satellite and hook it to the NTP server.

Then the NTP server is connected to the Local Area Network where I
have several Windows 3.1.1 workstations which are my NTP clients.

I visited the "http://www.boulder.nist.gov/timefreq/service/its.htm"
web site and it is mentioned that the NIST Internet Time Service
software allows users to synchronize computer clocks via the Internet.

The problem is that our we are not allowed to have internet
connections in our network so we won't be able to get the time from
the NTP servers in the United States unless we dial-in to the servers
which would be very costly to us.

Hence would this setup up work especially with the Win 3.1.1 machines?
If not, could you please propose another solution.

Sorry if i have posted this question this forum.

Thanks!
0
dinduman14
7/1/2003 7:19:22 AM
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dinduman14@hotmail.com (Dinesh) wrote in message news:<a2d71ba.0306302319.208c6f40@posting.google.com>...
> Hello all,
> 
> I visited the "http://www.boulder.nist.gov/timefreq/service/its.htm"
> web site and it is mentioned that the NIST Internet Time Service
> software allows users to synchronize computer clocks via the Internet.

Hi Dinesh,

If you look closely at the documentation, you should notice that this
software doesn't support the NTP Protocol.  It does use the Daytime
Protocol (RFC-867) or the Time Protocol (RFC-868).  Both of those
protocols can be provided by the Symmetricom Syncserver S100, but they
don't provide the precision of NTP.  This combination of timeserver
and software should keep those Windows 3.1 system synchronized to
within a second or two.  For better accuracy, you will need an SNTP
client.

Enjoy,


roy

-- 
The suespammers.org mail server is located in California.  Please do
not send unsolicited bulk e-mail or unsolicited commercial e-mail to
my suespammers.org address or any of my other addresses.  These are my
opinions, not necessarily my employer's.
0
roy
7/4/2003 1:29:39 AM
"Roy" <roy@suespammers.org> wrote in message
news:33fd22f7.0307031729.18be26e3@posting.google.com...
> dinduman14@hotmail.com (Dinesh) wrote in message
news:<a2d71ba.0306302319.208c6f40@posting.google.com>...
> > Hello all,
> >
> > I visited the "http://www.boulder.nist.gov/timefreq/service/its.htm"
> > web site and it is mentioned that the NIST Internet Time Service
> > software allows users to synchronize computer clocks via the Internet.
>
> Hi Dinesh,
>
> If you look closely at the documentation, you should notice that this
> software doesn't support the NTP Protocol.  It does use the Daytime
> Protocol (RFC-867) or the Time Protocol (RFC-868).  Both of those
> protocols can be provided by the Symmetricom Syncserver S100, but they
> don't provide the precision of NTP.  This combination of timeserver
> and software should keep those Windows 3.1 system synchronized to
> within a second or two.  For better accuracy, you will need an SNTP
> client.
>
> Enjoy,
>

Actually the latest 32-bit version of NIST's ITS package does support NTP.
From the Help file under "Message Formats":

`The program can communicate with a time server using either of two formats:
the "daytime" protocol, which uses tcp/ip port 13, and the Network Time
Protocol (NTP), which uses udp/ip port 123.  NIST servers will respond to
requests in either format.`

The real problem IMO with the NIST software is that it only allows you to
select from among a half-dozen or so Stratum 1 servers.  SNTP clients such
as Dimension 4 allow you to choose any server you like (ideally your ISP's).


Brian




0
Brian
7/4/2003 7:59:34 PM
"Brian Garrett" wrote...
> > > Hello all,
> > >
> > > I visited the "http://www.boulder.nist.gov/timefreq/service/its.htm"
> > > web site and it is mentioned that the NIST Internet Time Service
> > > software allows users to synchronize computer clocks via the Internet.
> >
> > Hi Dinesh,
> >
> > If you look closely at the documentation, you should notice that this
> > software doesn't support the NTP Protocol.  It does use the Daytime
> > Protocol (RFC-867) or the Time Protocol (RFC-868).  Both of those
> > protocols can be provided by the Symmetricom Syncserver S100, but they
> > don't provide the precision of NTP.  This combination of timeserver
> > and software should keep those Windows 3.1 system synchronized to
> > within a second or two.  For better accuracy, you will need an SNTP
> > client.
> >
> > Enjoy,
> >
> 
> Actually the latest 32-bit version of NIST's ITS package does support NTP.
> From the Help file under "Message Formats":
> 
> `The program can communicate with a time server using either of two formats:
> the "daytime" protocol, which uses tcp/ip port 13, and the Network Time
> Protocol (NTP), which uses udp/ip port 123.  NIST servers will respond to
> requests in either format.`
> 
> The real problem IMO with the NIST software is that it only allows you to
> select from among a half-dozen or so Stratum 1 servers.  SNTP clients such
> as Dimension 4 allow you to choose any server you like (ideally your ISP's).
> 
> 
> Brian

Brian,

In my reply I deleted the part of Dinesh's original post that
specified the software must run on Windows 3.1.  Both of the programs
you mention require a 32-bit version of Windows.

Sorry for the confusion.


roy

-- 
The suespammers.org mail server is located in California.  Please do
not send unsolicited bulk e-mail or unsolicited commercial e-mail to
my suespammers.org address or any of my other addresses.  These are my
opinions, not necessarily my employer's.
0
roy
7/6/2003 5:26:48 AM
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