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Re: Using the fonts available in the Format>Font menu as part of Style[]?

I don't know which fonts are chess fonts but have you tried just using them? 

The following works for me

Style["This is a test of various fonts 0123456789",
    FontFamily -> #, 18] & /@
  {"American Typewriter", "Arial",
   "Papyrus", "Playbill", "Webdings",
   "Zapf Dingbats"} // Column


Bob Hanlon

---- Jason Ebaugh <ebaughjason@gmail.com> wrote: 

=============
Hello -> All,

Is there any way to use the fonts available in the Format>Font menu as part
of Style[]?

I am writing a chess program that could really make use of the Chess fonts.
However, it seems that these fonts can only be added on somewhat
superficially, by changing the font of already generated output. I don't see
a way for a function to display them directly, without a human being going
into the Font menu.


Thanks a10^6,
Jason


Jason Ebaugh, PhD.

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Bob
11/2/2010 10:00:23 AM
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In response to a query about Fonts and Formats, Bob Hanlon 
<hanlonr@cox.net>  suggests the example:

> Style["This is a test of various fonts 0123456789",
>     FontFamily -> #, 18] & /@
>   {"American Typewriter", "Arial",
>    "Papyrus", "Playbill", "Webdings",
>    "Zapf Dingbats"} // Column

I was intrigued by the "// Column" suffix -- a usage I had not 
previously encountered.

And, it took my mind back to a couple of recent threads where posters 
enthused over 'examples' as a desirable form of documentation, and as a 
good way of learning the intricacies of Mathematica.  

My (unposted) reaction at that time had been that examples can give you 
good bits of code, which you can copy and use immediately; but they can 
also be a *bad* (or at best misleading) way of learning Mathematica, 
because of the human tendency to think that if some particular coding 
gimmick works in one example, it's likely to work in other apparently 
similar or parallel situations -- in other words, the natural human 
tendency to generalize.

The above example provides a beautiful example of this.  Try copying it 
and executing it six consecutive times, replacing the word 'Column" 
successively by

   Row, RowForm, Column, ColumnForm, Table, TableForm

[and, as always, make your own prediction *in advance* as to what's 
going to happen in each case.]

0
AES
11/3/2010 7:59:19 AM
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