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Laptop power on Delta Flight - IBM Laptop

Hi, i will be travelling internationally and just wanted to find out
which adapter would be compatible with the airline power system. I will
be taking a Delta flight Boeing 777-200. As per seatguru.com all seats
do have inseat power but can't seem to find out for certain which
adapter would be compatible. Delta uses the Empower system. I am
looking at a couple of targus adapters however am not sure if I should
get the 75W or the 90W. Is there a difference on the plane? Would the
90W adapter work if the Delta power system is only 75W? thx

0
netkid12 (3)
11/6/2006 10:24:56 PM
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<netkid12@gmail.com> wrote in message 
news:1162851896.492010.281670@k70g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
> Hi, i will be travelling internationally and just wanted to find out
> which adapter would be compatible with the airline power system. I will
> be taking a Delta flight Boeing 777-200. As per seatguru.com all seats
> do have inseat power but can't seem to find out for certain which
> adapter would be compatible. Delta uses the Empower system. I am
> looking at a couple of targus adapters however am not sure if I should
> get the 75W or the 90W. Is there a difference on the plane? Would the
> 90W adapter work if the Delta power system is only 75W? thx

If the adapter fits then it wouldn't matter.  Watts is the result of the 
voltage available and the current that your laptop draws. 


0
11/6/2006 11:00:48 PM
The power rating is a max, not necessarily what it will draw.  You will 
only draw the power that you need.  So get the 90w adapter unless there 
is a huge price difference.  [to use less power, don't actually use the 
laptop and charge the battery at the same time].  The worst case 
scenario is that you blow a fuse in the seat power socket.


netkid12@gmail.com wrote:
> Hi, i will be travelling internationally and just wanted to find out
> which adapter would be compatible with the airline power system. I will
> be taking a Delta flight Boeing 777-200. As per seatguru.com all seats
> do have inseat power but can't seem to find out for certain which
> adapter would be compatible. Delta uses the Empower system. I am
> looking at a couple of targus adapters however am not sure if I should
> get the 75W or the 90W. Is there a difference on the plane? Would the
> 90W adapter work if the Delta power system is only 75W? thx
> 
0
WatzmanNOSPAM (5711)
11/6/2006 11:33:00 PM
Barry Watzman wrote:
> 
> The power rating is a max, not necessarily what it will draw.  You will
> only draw the power that you need.  So get the 90w adapter unless there
> is a huge price difference.  [to use less power, don't actually use the
> laptop and charge the battery at the same time].  The worst case
> scenario is that you blow a fuse in the seat power socket.
>
> <snip>

Where is the fuse/breaker located?

The cockpit? The cabin?

Just curious!

Notan
0
notan1 (354)
11/6/2006 11:57:17 PM
"Notan" <notan@ddress.thatcanbespammed> wrote in message 
news:454FCBDD.E34D7DFC@ddress.thatcanbespammed...
> Barry Watzman wrote:
>>
>> The power rating is a max, not necessarily what it will draw.  You will
>> only draw the power that you need.  So get the 90w adapter unless there
>> is a huge price difference.  [to use less power, don't actually use the
>> laptop and charge the battery at the same time].  The worst case
>> scenario is that you blow a fuse in the seat power socket.
>>
>> <snip>
>
> Where is the fuse/breaker located?
>
> The cockpit? The cabin?
>
> Just curious!
>
> Notan

If you smell something bad under you seat it means you're drawing too much power.

Adam 


0
11/7/2006 2:25:45 AM
Don't know; probably there is one in each seat itself.  It might be a 
self-resetting circuit breaker.

Notan wrote:
> Barry Watzman wrote:
>> The power rating is a max, not necessarily what it will draw.  You will
>> only draw the power that you need.  So get the 90w adapter unless there
>> is a huge price difference.  [to use less power, don't actually use the
>> laptop and charge the battery at the same time].  The worst case
>> scenario is that you blow a fuse in the seat power socket.
>>
>> <snip>
> 
> Where is the fuse/breaker located?
> 
> The cockpit? The cabin?
> 
> Just curious!
> 
> Notan
0
WatzmanNOSPAM (5711)
11/7/2006 3:51:24 AM
Adam Helberg wrote:
> 
> "Notan" <notan@ddress.thatcanbespammed> wrote in message
> news:454FCBDD.E34D7DFC@ddress.thatcanbespammed...
> > Barry Watzman wrote:
> >>
> >> The power rating is a max, not necessarily what it will draw.  You will
> >> only draw the power that you need.  So get the 90w adapter unless there
> >> is a huge price difference.  [to use less power, don't actually use the
> >> laptop and charge the battery at the same time].  The worst case
> >> scenario is that you blow a fuse in the seat power socket.
> >>
> >> <snip>
> >
> > Where is the fuse/breaker located?
> >
> > The cockpit? The cabin?
> >
> > Just curious!
> >
> > Notan
> 
> If you smell something bad under you seat it means you're drawing too much power.

I always wrote that off to bad burritos, just before the flight! <g>

Notan
0
notan1 (354)
11/7/2006 3:06:16 PM
Notan wrote:
> Adam Helberg wrote:
>> "Notan" <notan@ddress.thatcanbespammed> wrote in message
>> news:454FCBDD.E34D7DFC@ddress.thatcanbespammed...
>>> Barry Watzman wrote:
>>>> The power rating is a max, not necessarily what it will draw.  You will
>>>> only draw the power that you need.  So get the 90w adapter unless there
>>>> is a huge price difference.  [to use less power, don't actually use the
>>>> laptop and charge the battery at the same time].  The worst case
>>>> scenario is that you blow a fuse in the seat power socket.
>>>>
>>>> <snip>
>>> Where is the fuse/breaker located?
>>>
>>> The cockpit? The cabin?
>>>
>>> Just curious!
>>>
>>> Notan
>> If you smell something bad under you seat it means you're drawing too much power.
> 
> I always wrote that off to bad burritos, just before the flight! <g>
> 
> Notan
Either you are very optimistic, or you are travelling First/Business. 
The problem is not, assuming it is here, the inseat power, but the angle 
the fellow seating in front of you can recline. As for the smell that 
could come from under your seat, burritos might be a cause, but not 
limited to ... :)

-- 
John Doue
0
notwobe (930)
11/7/2006 3:57:50 PM
Barry Watzman wrote:

> is a huge price difference.  [to use less power, don't actually use the
> laptop and charge the battery at the same time].  The worst case

It is forbidden to charge the battery on an aircraft. Airline adapters
are supposed to be sensed by the computer.

An example (from an iBook technical ref manual): "The iBook can operate
from a 15-volt power outlet on an airliner, however for safety reasons
the computer will not allowbattery charging. In order for the computer
to detect the connection to airline power, the airline power cable
(available separately) should have a sense resistor of 24.3K ohms
connected between the power plug's shell and ground."

0
zwsdotcom (2776)
11/7/2006 4:15:21 PM
zwsdotcom@gmail.com wrote:
> In order for the computer
> to detect the connection to airline power, the airline power cable
> (available separately) should have a sense resistor of 24.3K ohms
> connected between the power plug's shell and ground."
> 

Thats a pretty long ground wire <g>

Ian Singer

-- 


=========================================================================
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0
iansinger (136)
11/7/2006 4:59:04 PM
<zwsdotcom@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:1162916121.212773.323860@i42g2000cwa.googlegroups.com
> Barry Watzman wrote:
>
>> is a huge price difference.  [to use less power, don't actually use
>> the laptop and charge the battery at the same time].  The worst case
>
> It is forbidden to charge the battery on an aircraft. Airline adapters
> are supposed to be sensed by the computer.
>
> An example (from an iBook technical ref manual): "The iBook can
> operate from a 15-volt power outlet on an airliner, however for
> safety reasons the computer will not allowbattery charging. In order
> for the computer to detect the connection to airline power, the
> airline power cable (available separately) should have a sense
> resistor of 24.3K ohms connected between the power plug's shell and
> ground."

Wow I didn't know this! I googled this and found this among others:

http://www.seatguru.com/articles/in-seat_laptop_power.php

-- 
Bill 

0
BillW50 (3525)
11/7/2006 5:43:58 PM
That ("It is forbidden to charge the battery on an aircraft") is just 
bullshit.  At least in the US.  Many power adapters are generic, the 
computer doesn't know what it's being powered from, and there are no 
regulations against charging batteries.


zwsdotcom@gmail.com wrote:
> Barry Watzman wrote:
> 
>> is a huge price difference.  [to use less power, don't actually use the
>> laptop and charge the battery at the same time].  The worst case
> 
> It is forbidden to charge the battery on an aircraft. Airline adapters
> are supposed to be sensed by the computer.
> 
> An example (from an iBook technical ref manual): "The iBook can operate
> from a 15-volt power outlet on an airliner, however for safety reasons
> the computer will not allowbattery charging. In order for the computer
> to detect the connection to airline power, the airline power cable
> (available separately) should have a sense resistor of 24.3K ohms
> connected between the power plug's shell and ground."
> 
0
WatzmanNOSPAM (5711)
11/7/2006 9:14:44 PM
Apple may implement that on their own products (perhaps for fear of 
liability), but it is absolutely not true that it is forbidden to charge 
a battery, nor, in general, is there any way for most laptops .... that 
have only a 2-wire interface to the power adapter .... to even know that 
they are running on an aircraft.  And since Fellowes, Targus and others 
make "generic" Auto/Air adapters that also don't know what computer they 
are being used with, it's just not a widely implemented practice.

An argument can be made that perhaps it should be, but on the other 
hand, keep in mind that the Sony batteries that were going incindary and 
were the cause of all of the recalls were doing so even when not being 
charged, even when removed from the laptop and just sitting passively 
without even being installed.


BillW50 wrote:
> <zwsdotcom@gmail.com> wrote in message
> news:1162916121.212773.323860@i42g2000cwa.googlegroups.com
>> Barry Watzman wrote:
>>
>>> is a huge price difference.  [to use less power, don't actually use
>>> the laptop and charge the battery at the same time].  The worst case
>>
>> It is forbidden to charge the battery on an aircraft. Airline adapters
>> are supposed to be sensed by the computer.
>>
>> An example (from an iBook technical ref manual): "The iBook can
>> operate from a 15-volt power outlet on an airliner, however for
>> safety reasons the computer will not allowbattery charging. In order
>> for the computer to detect the connection to airline power, the
>> airline power cable (available separately) should have a sense
>> resistor of 24.3K ohms connected between the power plug's shell and
>> ground."
> 
> Wow I didn't know this! I googled this and found this among others:
> 
> http://www.seatguru.com/articles/in-seat_laptop_power.php
> 
0
WatzmanNOSPAM (5711)
11/7/2006 9:19:26 PM
"Barry Watzman" <WatzmanNOSPAM@neo.rr.com> wrote in message
news:4550F744.30509@neo.rr.com
> That ("It is forbidden to charge the battery on an aircraft") is just
> bullshit.  At least in the US.  Many power adapters are generic, the
> computer doesn't know what it's being powered from, and there are no
> regulations against charging batteries.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Q: Will my battery charge while I'm plugged in?

A: Don't count on it. Again, because of the limited amount of power draw 
per seat, it is possible that your laptop won't get enough power to both 
operate and charge. Some airlines, like *Continental Airlines, 
specifically state that battery charging is not allowed and ask you to 
remove your rechargeable battery from your device*.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

http://www.seatguru.com/articles/in-seat_laptop_power.php

-- 
Bill

0
BillW50 (3525)
11/7/2006 9:32:30 PM
From what I have read, airlines generally only give you 75 watts maximum 
and some laptops are smart enough to figure out that they can't charge 
and run the laptop at the same time. Thus they won't charge. I don't 
know, are there laptops like this?

Also I have read in the quoted link below, that some airlines tell you 
that you can't charge batteries on the plane. And ask you to remove the 
battery. I also hear tell that the 15VDC power goes out without warning 
during takeoffs and landings. Nice while you don't have a battery 
installed, eh? Thank goodness for my PDA that runs 2 weeks on a charge. 
;)

Bill

"Barry Watzman" <WatzmanNOSPAM@neo.rr.com> wrote in message
news:4550F85E.9010702@neo.rr.com
> Apple may implement that on their own products (perhaps for fear of
> liability), but it is absolutely not true that it is forbidden to
> charge a battery, nor, in general, is there any way for most laptops
> .... that have only a 2-wire interface to the power adapter .... to
> even know that they are running on an aircraft.  And since Fellowes,
> Targus and others make "generic" Auto/Air adapters that also don't
> know what computer they are being used with, it's just not a widely
> implemented practice.
> An argument can be made that perhaps it should be, but on the other
> hand, keep in mind that the Sony batteries that were going incindary
> and were the cause of all of the recalls were doing so even when not
> being charged, even when removed from the laptop and just sitting
> passively without even being installed.
>
>
> BillW50 wrote:
>> <zwsdotcom@gmail.com> wrote in message
>> news:1162916121.212773.323860@i42g2000cwa.googlegroups.com
>>> Barry Watzman wrote:
>>>
>>>> is a huge price difference.  [to use less power, don't actually use
>>>> the laptop and charge the battery at the same time].  The worst
>>>> case
>>>
>>> It is forbidden to charge the battery on an aircraft. Airline
>>> adapters are supposed to be sensed by the computer.
>>>
>>> An example (from an iBook technical ref manual): "The iBook can
>>> operate from a 15-volt power outlet on an airliner, however for
>>> safety reasons the computer will not allowbattery charging. In order
>>> for the computer to detect the connection to airline power, the
>>> airline power cable (available separately) should have a sense
>>> resistor of 24.3K ohms connected between the power plug's shell and
>>> ground."
>>
>> Wow I didn't know this! I googled this and found this among others:
>>
>> http://www.seatguru.com/articles/in-seat_laptop_power.php

0
BillW50 (3525)
11/7/2006 9:42:37 PM
netkid12@gmail.com wrote:
> ...travelling internationally...[w/ IBM Laptop]...

the IBM ac/dc power brick 22p9003 puts out 72.8 watts
dc input is a male cigarette lighter plug

0
tpl1 (3)
11/7/2006 11:45:54 PM
zwsdotcom@gmail.com wrote:
> Barry Watzman wrote:
> 
>> is a huge price difference.  [to use less power, don't actually use the
>> laptop and charge the battery at the same time].  The worst case
> 
> It is forbidden to charge the battery on an aircraft. Airline adapters
> are supposed to be sensed by the computer.

Huh? I've used EmPower and cigarette lighter outlets on planes many 
times, and the DC to DC adapter always charges the battery. It's cool 
that Apple can use the emPower power directly, without an intervening DC 
to DC converter, but on American they don't use emPower.
0
11/8/2006 1:21:18 AM
Keep in mind the following:

1.  The rated output is the MAXIMUM output that the power supply is 
rated for.  It probably won't be putting out that much in a typical 
situation ... that's "worst case".

2.  If the power supply puts out 72.8 watts, it's input is higher than 
that.  For example, if the supply is 75% efficient, and it's putting out 
72.8 watts, it's input requirement will be 97 watts.


Tom Lightbody wrote:
> netkid12@gmail.com wrote:
>> ...travelling internationally...[w/ IBM Laptop]...
> 
> the IBM ac/dc power brick 22p9003 puts out 72.8 watts
> dc input is a male cigarette lighter plug
> 
0
WatzmanNOSPAM (5711)
11/8/2006 1:30:22 AM
For all commenting about this issue, how many of you have actually done
it? I recently flew home from the UK on American Airlines (coach
class), and I charged my Dell 710m using the original charger and a
DC-to-AC converter plugged into my seat DC source. No problem at all.
No heat or smell. I edited my digital photos I took earlier and watched
DVDs with no issues.  Note that my Dell uses a smart charger which uses
a serial data coding to inform the laptop that it is a "genuine" brick,
hence a general purpose brick from Targus will not charge the battery,
regardless of power source.

Barry Watzman wrote:
> Keep in mind the following:
>
> 1.  The rated output is the MAXIMUM output that the power supply is
> rated for.  It probably won't be putting out that much in a typical
> situation ... that's "worst case".
>
> 2.  If the power supply puts out 72.8 watts, it's input is higher than
> that.  For example, if the supply is 75% efficient, and it's putting out
> 72.8 watts, it's input requirement will be 97 watts.
>
>
> Tom Lightbody wrote:
> > netkid12@gmail.com wrote:
> >> ...travelling internationally...[w/ IBM Laptop]...
> >
> > the IBM ac/dc power brick 22p9003 puts out 72.8 watts
> > dc input is a male cigarette lighter plug
> >

0
cmdrdata (43)
11/8/2006 12:56:13 PM
Reply: