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Microsoft and rights management. right...

What M$ has in store for you.

http://www.gripe2ed.com/scoop/story/2003/9/25/101437/094

-- 
Regards,
JP
"The measure of a man is what he will do while expecting that he will get nothing in return!"

Macintosh for productivity. Linux for servers. Palm/Visor for mobility. Windows to feed the Black Hole in your IT budget
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jpolaski2 (4002)
10/1/2003 10:03:14 PM
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In article <jpolaski-457F9F.17031301102003@netnews.attbi.com>, Jim Polaski wrote:
> What M$ has in store for you.
> 
> http://www.gripe2ed.com/scoop/story/2003/9/25/101437/094

Gosh...Microsoft providing what the customers want.  How evil of them.

-- 
Evidence Eliminator is worthless.  See evidence-eliminator-sucks.com
--Tim Smith
0
reply_in_group (13194)
10/5/2003 8:26:01 PM
In article <t7%fb.2706$Qy2.138@newsread4.news.pas.earthlink.net>, Tim
Smith <reply_in_group@mouse-potato.com> wrote:

> In article <jpolaski-457F9F.17031301102003@netnews.attbi.com>, Jim Polaski
> wrote:
> > What M$ has in store for you.
> > 
> > http://www.gripe2ed.com/scoop/story/2003/9/25/101437/094
> 
> Gosh...Microsoft providing what the customers want.  How evil of them.

I hope you had your tongue firmly in cheek when you typed that! <G>

I saw this the other day and figure out I'll handle it just like I
handle unwanted callers on my phone and spam in my email, only a bit
more forcefully.

Should I receive one of these idiot secure documents or email, just
bounce them right back!  

But a question arises, if it is 'secure' but only can be read or
whatever with MS permission policy use, how is anyone outside of a MS
house gonna use it?  Something tells me that outside the corporate
firewall, this shit will be a dud.

Lloyd
0
10/5/2003 8:50:17 PM
In article <051020031550163041%lloydparsons@nospammac.com>, Lloyd Parsons
wrote:
>> Gosh...Microsoft providing what the customers want.  How evil of them.
> 
> I hope you had your tongue firmly in cheek when you typed that! <G>

No, customers are asking them for this kind of thing.  Corporate users want
to be able to pass around mail, spreadsheets, and stuff like that, both
within a given office, and to other branch offices, subcontractors, etc.,
with some protection against accidents or out-of-date messages.

....
> But a question arises, if it is 'secure' but only can be read or whatever
> with MS permission policy use, how is anyone outside of a MS house gonna
> use it?  Something tells me that outside the corporate firewall, this shit
> will be a dud.

So?  Inside the corporations is where the money is.

Apple should probably do something in this area, such as taking one of the
free projects that does this kind of thing (yes, I've seen such projects),
adopting it for OS X, and publish full specs, with a completely free (in all
senses) license to allow others to implement it--maybe even do a good free
Windows implementation themselves.

The idea here is to try to make sure that corporations standardize on a free
version of this kind of rights management, rather than an MS-only version,
so that people won't be forced to go to MS to interoperate.

-- 
Evidence Eliminator is worthless.  See evidence-eliminator-sucks.com
--Tim Smith
0
reply_in_group (13194)
10/6/2003 12:23:37 AM
In article <dC2gb.3592$Qy2.2756@newsread4.news.pas.earthlink.net>, Tim
Smith <reply_in_group@mouse-potato.com> wrote:

> In article <051020031550163041%lloydparsons@nospammac.com>, Lloyd Parsons
> wrote:
> >> Gosh...Microsoft providing what the customers want.  How evil of them.
> > 
> > I hope you had your tongue firmly in cheek when you typed that! <G>
> 
> No, customers are asking them for this kind of thing.  Corporate users want
> to be able to pass around mail, spreadsheets, and stuff like that, both
> within a given office, and to other branch offices, subcontractors, etc.,
> with some protection against accidents or out-of-date messages.
> 
Where have you found that customers are asking for it?  I know MS has
used that line since forever, but even after over 20 years in this
business, I've yet to come across anyone that was ever asked.

But something is niggling at the back of my head.  Didn't Word and
Excel have something like this in earlier versions?  I'm almost certain
that they did.

> ...
> > But a question arises, if it is 'secure' but only can be read or whatever
> > with MS permission policy use, how is anyone outside of a MS house gonna
> > use it?  Something tells me that outside the corporate firewall, this shit
> > will be a dud.
> 
> So?  Inside the corporations is where the money is.
>
Yep, lots of money, but the growth and profit is in small business.

> Apple should probably do something in this area, such as taking one of the
> free projects that does this kind of thing (yes, I've seen such projects),
> adopting it for OS X, and publish full specs, with a completely free (in all
> senses) license to allow others to implement it--maybe even do a good free
> Windows implementation themselves.
> 
> The idea here is to try to make sure that corporations standardize on a free
> version of this kind of rights management, rather than an MS-only version,
> so that people won't be forced to go to MS to interoperate.

Anything that would keep MS from setting the standard would be good. 
But I'm not sure DRM by any other name is such a hot idea.

Lloyd
0
10/6/2003 12:38:31 AM
In article <dC2gb.3592$Qy2.2756@newsread4.news.pas.earthlink.net>,
 Tim Smith <reply_in_group@mouse-potato.com> wrote:

> In article <051020031550163041%lloydparsons@nospammac.com>, Lloyd Parsons
> wrote:
> >> Gosh...Microsoft providing what the customers want.  How evil of them.
> > 
> > I hope you had your tongue firmly in cheek when you typed that! <G>
> 
> No, customers are asking them for this kind of thing.  Corporate users want
> to be able to pass around mail, spreadsheets, and stuff like that, both
> within a given office, and to other branch offices, subcontractors, etc.,
> with some protection against accidents or out-of-date messages.

Got any evidence of this?

> 
> ...
> > But a question arises, if it is 'secure' but only can be read or whatever
> > with MS permission policy use, how is anyone outside of a MS house gonna
> > use it?  Something tells me that outside the corporate firewall, this shit
> > will be a dud.
> 
> So?  Inside the corporations is where the money is.
> 
> Apple should probably do something in this area, such as taking one of the
> free projects that does this kind of thing (yes, I've seen such projects),
> adopting it for OS X, and publish full specs, with a completely free (in all
> senses) license to allow others to implement it--maybe even do a good free
> Windows implementation themselves.
> 
> The idea here is to try to make sure that corporations standardize on a free
> version of this kind of rights management, rather than an MS-only version,
> so that people won't be forced to go to MS to interoperate.

-- 
Alan Baker
Vancouver, British Columbia
"If you raise the ceiling 4 feet, move the fireplace from that wall
to that wall, you'll still only get the full stereophonic effect
if you sit in the bottom of that cupboard."
0
alangbaker (17682)
10/6/2003 8:07:26 AM
Reply: